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In preparation for Torrey


bmwdude

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What should I bring?

 

This will be my first multi-day trek on a motorcycle. The obvious things are:

 

helmet, bike, me, clothes (including boots), money and things like that but I was wondering about coldish-weather items and especially emergency items like flat tire harware even though I am so not handy that I wouldn't know what to do anyway with a flat other than call AAA.

 

...Just trying to plan ahead in case I need to order something that is going to take a while to get to me.

 

Thanks!!

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Hi,

 

Torrey and surrounding regions weather can change rapidly.

It can be real cool there,especially in the AM,can have afternoon thunderstorms that may include hail.

Yes,bring your heated gear and rain gear.But also be prepared for HOT.

 

Be prepared with a flat kit,some areas don't have any cell coverage.

 

Get gas when you can,there are a few long stretches that smaller tank bikes can't complete.RT's and GS's are usually good to go,due to the tank size.

Read the route descriptions on the main Torrey site,that will tell you about fuel stops on the main ride routes.

 

 

JR356

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I'm trying to figure out what the heck is Torrey. I went to BMWMOA, no Torrey in the events. I found Torrey on the map in Utah. So, I went to the Beehive Beemers web site and looked at upcomming events. No Torrey.

I R confused. What and where is this Torrey event?

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What and where is this Torrey event?
It's a BMWST (this place) related twice a year non rally, the next one will be #14. As the name suggests it's held in Torrey, dates and lodging info can be found here. More info will appear as the time gets closer
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I'm not sure I dare attend such a non-event. I mean, I have all these pre-conceived ideas about you all. What if I'm wrong? confused.gif Or perhaps worse, what if I'm right? eek.gif

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I'm not sure I dare attend such a non-event. I mean, I have all these pre-conceived ideas about you all. What if I'm wrong? confused.gif Or perhaps worse, what if I'm right? eek.gif
lmao.gif
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I'm not sure I dare attend such a non-event. I mean, I have all these pre-conceived ideas about you all. What if I'm wrong? confused.gif Or perhaps worse, what if I'm right? eek.gif

 

 

 

Yes. yes... thats funny wave.gif

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I'm not sure I dare attend such a non-event. I mean, I have all these pre-conceived ideas about you all. What if I'm wrong? confused.gif Or perhaps worse, what if I'm right? eek.gif

Both of your thoughts are accurate. Especially Wurty, he's a sick, twisted man lmao.giflmao.gif hence the KY jelly and credit card. eek.gif

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I'm trying to figure out what the heck is Torrey. I went to BMWMOA, no Torrey in the events.
I'm not sure I dare attend such a non-event. I mean, I have all these pre-conceived ideas about you all. What if I'm wrong? confused.gif Or perhaps worse, what if I'm right? eek.gif
Surely you jest??!! 234 posts, just shy of seven years on this forum, and you haven't figured out what this group is about or what Torrey is about. What have you been reading and posting to? There is life after tire pressure and oil threads. And BTW, what the F*%! does BMWMOA have to do with this forum and it's gatherings? Sheeeeesh! Sorry folks, my patience quotient is running a bit low today.

 

Some single malt anyone? See y'all in Torreeeeey. thumbsup.gif

 

Oh yeah, regarding preparation for Torrey, took care of that before I left the CW by confirming my reservation for this time. thumbsup.gif

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Also pack the Torrey HQ number 800-863-3288. If you can get to a phone (as JR has said, cell signal is usually non-existent), help can be summoned. I know it works! thumbsup.gif

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What should I bring?

 

helmet, bike, me, clothes (including boots), money and things like that but I was wondering about coldish-weather items and especially emergency items like flat tire harware even though I am so not handy that I wouldn't know what to do anyway with a flat other than call AAA.

Well since most of the others have been SO helpful . . . . smirk.gif

 

A trip from CA to Torrey can go through a very long thermometer (one fall from SoCal we went from 34*F to 106*F within two days). Layering is the key to comfort. When it's cold layer up, when it's really cold if you don't have electrics try putting your rain gear on even though it's not raining to help cut the wind. Get rain gloves, too for your hands (like the three-fingered ones from Aerostitch that will slip on over your regular ones). Start with thin, yet full length layers like poly-propylene or even better--silk next to your skin. This wicking layer will help keep you warmer in winter (by trapping an insulating layer of air next to your skin) and cooler in summer (by aiding evaporative cooling). For cold, add one or more layers of (polar)fleece over your wicking layer. It doesn't have to be thick enough to be bulky and uncomfortable, but don't forget any parts of your body.

 

You want thin polypro sock liners (again silk is preferred here) under some sort of wool sock is best (hopefully you'll have room in your normal riding boots to acommodate this). You can get fairly form-fitting yet stretchy leggings (like the tights the football players wear) as well as top (turtle neck is best) and a fleece layer over both top and bottom. Look for something not too bulky--it's not supposed to look stylish, just not bulk up in your joints when you're bent-over on the bike for hours on end. You can get silk glove liners as well to get another 10-15*F comfort range out of your gloves, but if you have heated grips half-insulated gloves are best so that the wind doesn't take the heat away from your hands as fast yet you still get the heat from the grips and don't lose too much "feel". Don't forget your neck and your head--these lose heat very fast and are easily forgotten about. My bottom layer is thin with a turtle neck and my fleece layer is also thin with a zip-up turtle neck, but the two layers together keep my neck warm without being so bulky that I can't turn my head. I also have a knit "dickie" (just the turtle-neck/polo part of the top of a shirt) that I can wear over the top of both if it's really cold. A silk balaclava over your head before you don your helmet will likely be thin enough to not change the fit of your helmet too much and make a big difference. Also, if your helmet comes with an optional skirting/wind block around the bottom and you left it in the box or can order another, it will also help.

 

Staying hydrated in the winter will keep you warmer as well, but it's ESPECIALLY important in the heat. Keep your nutrition/blood sugar up in the winter to allow your body to generate heat efficiently and be sure to replace the electrolytes you're losing to sweating in the summer. Torrey (and most of Utah/Nevada/Arizona) is incredibly dry and you can lose so much water and salts (sodium and potassium especially) through evaporative cooling you don't even realize it until you're already depleted.

 

As far as tire issues, take your seat off and pull out the BMW patch kit--get familiar with it's contents and read the directions. If you can get a hold of a scrap tire and practice at least the plugging part. I also carry a small air compressor from Cycle Gadgets and a bottle of "Slime". This will get me to civilization and avoid having to sit on the side of the road in 100+*F heat waiting 4-6 hours for a tow. tongue.gif

 

If there's a Tech Daze offered within a day's ride of your house--get your butt over there! You can learn a LOT about working on your bike and increase your confidence to be able to handle things that you might not think were within your reach previously. Frequently, there will be tire changing or at least an old tire lying around to practice the plugging part on!

 

If you have an old analog cell phone, charge it up and take it along with a 12VDC charger. Even if you no longer pay for service on it, if you can hit any cell tower with it you can still call 911 if it gets really bad! thumbsup.gif

 

Remember, you're going to be crossing a lot of EMPTY space, so if you can find someone with a similar schedule and riding style it's always more fun (and a bit safer) to find a buddy or three to ride out with. There are a lot of folks on this board who would be happy to take a newbie under their wing and "share the love". We all were new at this at one time. Be sure to get and leave phone numbers with folks at home and on the road. If you can't post here en route, it's also a good idea to have someone at home who can post-up here if you get into trouble. This DB's history is full of folks banding together to help out a rider in trouble on the road. If you can get word out here it's not uncommon for one of us to beat a tow truck to you, and if we can fix your problem we might be able to get you underway in time to not even miss dinner! cool.gif

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What should I bring?

 

helmet, bike, me, clothes (including boots), money and things like that but I was wondering about coldish-weather items and especially emergency items like flat tire harware even though I am so not handy that I wouldn't know what to do anyway with a flat other than call AAA.

Well since most of the others have been SO helpful . . . . smirk.gif

 

A trip from CA to Torrey can go through a very long thermometer (one fall from SoCal we went from 34*F to 106*F within two days). Layering is the key to comfort. When it's cold layer up, when it's really cold if you don't have electrics try putting your rain gear on even though it's not raining to help cut the wind. Get rain gloves, too for your hands (like the three-fingered ones from Aerostitch that will slip on over your regular ones). Start with thin, yet full length layers like poly-propylene or even better--silk next to your skin. This wicking layer will help keep you warmer in winter (by trapping an insulating layer of air next to your skin) and cooler in summer (by aiding evaporative cooling). For cold, add one or more layers of (polar)fleece over your wicking layer. It doesn't have to be thick enough to be bulky and uncomfortable, but don't forget any parts of your body.

 

You want thin polypro sock liners (again silk is preferred here) under some sort of wool sock is best (hopefully you'll have room in your normal riding boots to acommodate this). You can get fairly form-fitting yet stretchy leggings (like the tights the football players wear) as well as top (turtle neck is best) and a fleece layer over both top and bottom. Look for something not too bulky--it's not supposed to look stylish, just not bulk up in your joints when you're bent-over on the bike for hours on end. You can get silk glove liners as well to get another 10-15*F comfort range out of your gloves, but if you have heated grips half-insulated gloves are best so that the wind doesn't take the heat away from your hands as fast yet you still get the heat from the grips and don't lose too much "feel". Don't forget your neck and your head--these lose heat very fast and are easily forgotten about. My bottom layer is thin with a turtle neck and my fleece layer is also thin with a zip-up turtle neck, but the two layers together keep my neck warm without being so bulky that I can't turn my head. I also have a knit "dickie" (just the turtle-neck/polo part of the top of a shirt) that I can wear over the top of both if it's really cold. A silk balaclava over your head before you don your helmet will likely be thin enough to not change the fit of your helmet too much and make a big difference. Also, if your helmet comes with an optional skirting/wind block around the bottom and you left it in the box or can order another, it will also help.

 

Staying hydrated in the winter will keep you warmer as well, but it's ESPECIALLY important in the heat. Keep your nutrition/blood sugar up in the winter to allow your body to generate heat efficiently and be sure to replace the electrolytes you're losing to sweating in the summer. Torrey (and most of Utah/Nevada/Arizona) is incredibly dry and you can lose so much water and salts (sodium and potassium especially) through evaporative cooling you don't even realize it until you're already depleted.

 

As far as tire issues, take your seat off and pull out the BMW patch kit--get familiar with it's contents and read the directions. If you can get a hold of a scrap tire and practice at least the plugging part. I also carry a small air compressor from Cycle Gadgets and a bottle of "Slime". This will get me to civilization and avoid having to sit on the side of the road in 100+*F heat waiting 4-6 hours for a tow. tongue.gif

 

If there's a Tech Daze offered within a day's ride of your house--get your butt over there! You can learn a LOT about working on your bike and increase your confidence to be able to handle things that you might not think were within your reach previously. Frequently, there will be tire changing or at least an old tire lying around to practice the plugging part on!

 

If you have an old analog cell phone, charge it up and take it along with a 12VDC charger. Even if you no longer pay for service on it, if you can hit any cell tower with it you can still call 911 if it gets really bad! thumbsup.gif

 

Remember, you're going to be crossing a lot of EMPTY space, so if you can find someone with a similar schedule and riding style it's always more fun (and a bit safer) to find a buddy or three to ride out with. There are a lot of folks on this board who would be happy to take a newbie under their wing and "share the love". We all were new at this at one time. Be sure to get and leave phone numbers with folks at home and on the road. If you can't post here en route, it's also a good idea to have someone at home who can post-up here if you get into trouble. This DB's history is full of folks banding together to help out a rider in trouble on the road. If you can get word out here it's not uncommon for one of us to beat a tow truck to you, and if we can fix your problem we might be able to get you underway in time to not even miss dinner! cool.gif

 

And you wonder why I used to call him "Nerdy Jamie"?

 

Good post amigo.

 

Kaisr thumbsup.gif

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Well since most of the others have been SO helpful . . . . smirk.gif

A trip from CA to Torrey can go through a very long thermometer...and if we can fix your problem we might be able to get you underway in time to not even miss dinner! cool.gif

 

Well, that is quite helpful and thorough. I will be making a list and checking it twice. I guess that I will put out a call closer to departure and see if I can ride with anyone or two or three.

 

Thanks.

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To flying Greg.

 

Get a life and get your head out from between the grip of your anal sphincter.

I do not jest. I seek information from reasonable and personable folk on this forum.

You sir, are not one of them. dopeslap.gif

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To flying Greg.

 

Get a life and get your head out from between the grip of your anal sphincter.

I do not jest. I seek information from reasonable and personable folk on this forum.

You sir, are not one of them. dopeslap.gif

 

I agree with you that Greg was out of line. Perhaps he was having a bad day. And based on the personal comments in your response, I rather take it that today wasn't your birthday, either. So let's cut the criticism, gentlemen. If we can't play nice today, then wait until tomorrow. You're both capable of better.

 

As for Torrey, we gather there to meet those with whom we've corresponded facelessly on this board over the year(s). We gather to ride, to eat, to laugh, and to share a sip of something a tick stronger than Ginger Ale. It is also said that we go there to share and grow the brotherhood that bonds us together. And that's as good an assessment of why Torrey exists and why it is so popular with the people on this board.

 

Come join us. It's very loosely organized and you can ride where you want with whomever you want. I promise you that you'll go home with at least 20 new friends, 50 new names, and an appreciation for why BMWST.com feels like home to so many of us.

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To flying Greg.

 

Get a life and get your head out from between the grip of your anal sphincter.

I do not jest. I seek information from reasonable and personable folk on this forum.

You sir, are not one of them. dopeslap.gif

 

Mr. Red,

 

Someone suggested to me that maybe I was a bit too harsh with you and that I needed to apologize. Fernando was correct in that maybe I was having a bad day, and maybe that was the case. I realize that this is suppose to be the kinder, gentler place for riders to gather, and I guess it is. There are days when maybe I shouldn't be posting because I'm not quite feeling like Mr. Rogers at the time. My post to you was one of those days.

 

That said, and not wishing to be harsh once again, it would help immensely if folks (not just you, red) would learn to do some research on their own before asking a question that has been previously asked and answered in tremendous detail many times over. A simple search of the word "Torrey" will produce a wealth of reading enjoyment. Of course, if one asks they will get an answer to their question. But, wouldn't it be nice if folks took some initiative and put forth some effort to find out the answer to a question that probably has been asked umpteen times already.

 

My apologies to Mr. Red and to anyone else I may have offended, who felt I was out of line in my original post. And thank you for allowing me to set things straight.

 

Now, back to your regular reading pleasure.

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it would help immensely if folks (not just you, red) would learn to do some research on their own before asking a question that has been previously asked and answered in tremendous detail many times over. A simple search of the word "Torrey" will produce a wealth of reading enjoyment.
Torrey - it's the new Oil and Tyres grin.gif

 

It's hopeless Greg, people are never going to search, especially while the search facility is so poor.

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JerryMather
It's hopeless Greg, people are never going to search, especially while the search facility is so poor.

 

+1, It's the worst one that I've ever used, IMO but maybe it's just me. dopeslap.gif

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...people are never going to search, especially while the search facility is so poor.
Labeling it as 'poor' is a compliment. It's got the worst search engine of all the sites I've visited. It takes me three attempts just to get the proper syntax in place and then I get kicked off for to many searches in some specified time frame. It's no wonder people get frustrated and repeatedly ask about 'oil' or ''tyres' (er...tires). Search for 'Torrey'. Holy crap, there's probably 10,000+ posts.

 

How many times has someone read "I tried searching for <fill-in-the-blank> but couldn't find it so I'll ask..."

 

As for Torrey, just show up. Everything you could need is within reach.

 

Mike O

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it would help immensely if folks (not just you, red) would learn to do some research on their own before asking a question that has been previously asked and answered in tremendous detail many times over. A simple search of the word "Torrey" will produce a wealth of reading enjoyment.
Torrey - it's the new Oil and Tyres grin.gif

 

It's hopeless Greg, people are never going to search, especially while the search facility is so poor.

The very reason I included the operative words of initiative and put forth some effort. dopeslap.gif

 

So, our search engine only runs on olive oil, but it's all we got. crazy.gif

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Les is more

Just replying--not necessarily to you, Greg.

 

If you do a search on +search +engine you'll find that the topic has been discussed ad nauseum in Discussion Board Support. grin.gif The search function is part of the software and is unlikely to change anytime soon. The best we have to offer is this tutorial in the Discussion Board Support Forum.

 

 

And now, please, back to our regularly scheduled TORREY programming. wave.gif

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As a Torrey novice, you will, of course, need to go through the various initiation ceremonies. Not to worry, it's only marginally more intense than a college or biker hazing. You will want to bring a few things:

 

6 yards of 3 inch bandage.

 

2 each 10 X 10 inch bandages.

 

1 quart of Betadine.

 

1 pint Oil of Clove.

 

1 pint ipecac.

 

1 pint calamine.

 

1 portable eye wash station/w industrial strength eye wash.

 

1 portable defibrillator. (a small one will do fine)

 

 

The whole thing will be over before you know it, and you'll be one of the gang!

 

 

Oh, don't worry about bringing fire extinguishers for the "flaming newbie ride," Bob/Killer has them at his place.

 

 

cool.gif

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Les is more

Wait...what was it Killer said about the extinguishers? Nevermind. It probably wasn't important.

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And as evidence of how badly the search facility sucks, yours was the only post it found in the last three years referencing ipecac, Ron. What's a n00b to do?

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Four responsive (helpful) posts out of a total of thirty posts isn't what I was expecting but it is diagnostic of the cast of characters. 4/30 is about failing if we were being graded. I see that you all (well, most of you on a bad day) have a sense of humor about things. Unfortunately, I had my sense of humor radiated and excised and have not found a transplant, as of yet.

Maybe the few helpful responses were just so thorough that no one else could add to the list of things to bring.

Thanks! wink.gif

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JerryMather
What should I bring?

 

This will be my first multi-day trek on a motorcycle. The obvious things are:

 

helmet, bike, me, clothes (including boots), money and things like that but I was wondering about coldish-weather items and especially emergency items like flat tire harware even though I am so not handy that I wouldn't know what to do anyway with a flat other than call AAA.

 

...Just trying to plan ahead in case I need to order something that is going to take a while to get to me.

 

Thanks!!

First off..............Bring a good sense of humor with you.

 

Buy a plug & go tire kit and a small 12v air compressor if you think it'll make you happier.

Pack the least amount of clothes possible to conserve space in your bags. A Gerbings electric jacket is always a good thing to have in the fall, just don't count on it working perfectly, bring a lite warm vest in case it doesn't.

 

I usually take the following:

Gerbings jacket

Vest

Flip Flops

Three changes of underwear

Pair of Jeans

Air Compressor w/ Tire Kit

ipod

Cigars

Toothbrush

,,,,,plus what I'm wearing while riding, leather pants, boots, touring jacket, gloves & a helmet.

 

Anything else is optional, but a map usually is a good thing if you've never been there before.

 

PS: If your a clothes whore and just can't get out of the house without your best Amari stuff, you can always UPS it up to your hotel and parade around the CW on Sat night with it on. thumbsup.gif

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The obvious things are:

Libations, cigars, gerbings, a couple changes of clothes, KOA roadside assistance card,

Duct tape, you have to bring your own to your hazing,

 

Money to help support the locals for putting up with us, digital camera, New tires on the bike before you leave.

And most important a Sense of Humor smirk.gif

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Joe Frickin' Friday
As for Torrey, we gather there to meet those with whom we've corresponded facelessly on this board over the year(s). We gather to ride, to eat, to laugh, and to share a sip of something a tick stronger than Ginger Ale. It is also said that we go there to share and grow the brotherhood that bonds us together. And that's as good an assessment of why Torrey exists and why it is so popular with the people on this board.

 

Well, that's the short answer. I prefer the long, beautifully eloquent answer you gave four months ago.

thumbsup.gif

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Joe Frickin' Friday
What should I bring?

 

This will be my first multi-day trek on a motorcycle. The obvious things are:

 

helmet, bike, me, clothes (including boots), money and things like that but I was wondering about coldish-weather items and especially emergency items like flat tire harware even though I am so not handy that I wouldn't know what to do anyway with a flat other than call AAA.

 

...Just trying to plan ahead in case I need to order something that is going to take a while to get to me.

 

Thanks!!

 

You may not be entirely handy with tools, but bring a full complement of tools and spares (clutch/throttle cables, alt belt, tire repair, etc.) of them anyway; if you're riding in a group, or a good mechanic happens to offer assistance wherever you're stranded, they may be able to put your tools to use for you.

 

On my trip to Torrey this spring, apart from the usual changes of clothes, my full-time riding gear consisted of boots, armored draggin jeans, T-shirt, and a full-face helmet. Depending on the weather, the remainder of my gear varied continuously from:

 

-Phoenix mesh jacket, warm-weather armored leather gloves

 

to

 

-Gericke all-weather jachet, sweatshirt, long-sleeve T-shirt, electric vest, all-weather gloves, rain overpants

 

On most days, I changed repeatedly between various combinations of the above items as dictated by conditions.

 

If you're tough, you might skip the Phoenix; that'll save a lot of luggage space. You can always unzip whatever other jacket you're wearing, or soak with water if necessary. Whatever you decide, do not head into/through the mountains without being ready to ride in a 35-degree hailstorm!

 

BMWMOA Anonymous handbook is occasionally handy. Just as handy is the phone # for the Chuckwagon in Torrey, who will be able to communicate with other BMWST folks who may be able to ride/drive out and assist you wherever you are.

 

Keep a spare credit card and cash (~$100) stashed somewhere on the bike, just in case your wallet goes AWOL. Consider keeping a list of phone #'s on the bike too, in case your cell phone goes Tango Uniform.

 

I recommend a spare key kept under the sole liner in one of your boots. Don't leave home with just one key!

 

Will post more stuff later if I think of anything new.

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Whatever you decide, do not head into/through the mountains without being ready to ride in a 35-degree hailstorm!
Absolutely. Hopefully you will be spared but you must be prepared for cold and wet weather or you risk a very unpleasant experience.
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Quote:

Whatever you decide, do not head into/through the mountains without being ready to ride in a 35-degree hailstorm!

 

Absolutely. Hopefully you will be spared but you must be prepared for cold and wet weather or you risk a very unpleasant experience.

 

Allow me to add my concurrence, be ready for cold too (you'll probably find mostly heat).

 

However, I think at this time it behooves us to state, explicitly, the obvious corollary to this rule: Do not under any circumstances fail to go through the mountains!

 

Not sure where in CA Corona del Mar is, but it has that So. Cal. sound to it. You can make Torrey from So. Cal. without any mountains, but I think you'll at least hit over 8000' feet coming up past Bryce (you will of course plan some stop time for Zion and for Bryce). You can run up into Cedar Breaks or Brian Head, not the best mountains, but acceptable. Perhaps one of the So. Cal. people can help you find some more along your route.

 

But, if it were me, and I didn't get out this way much, I would strongly consider one of the following two options if you can add a couple of days or a week:

 

1. Shoot over to Mesa Verde, Durango, Silverton, Ouray and back down through Grand Junction or through the very remote Uranium country. Add two to four days.

 

2. Shoot up along the Green River through Duschene, Vernal, Ft. Bridger, Pinedale to Jackson and Yellowstone. Add a week.

 

Just my thoughts for someone planning to ride the inter-mountain west for the first time. It's really the only time of year that both mountains and desert are both fine at the same time, though Up by Jackson/Yellowstone it may be starting to get chilly. I'd do the Colorado loop for early fall.

 

Anyway have a great ride. Hope to meet you there, we'll be newbies to "Torrey" to, although we've been to Torrey the town/area plenty.

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Okay, my list is getting longer...very good. Packing will be a nice challenge. At least the temperature variations won't be what I just experienced over the past few days...from 111 degrees around Hoover Dam to upper lower 80s Sedona/Phoenix and points cooler west.

 

btw, Corona del Mar (CdM) is part of Newport Beach which is between Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach just west of Irvine. Not much in the way of close, good rides but plenty in neighboring counties.

 

Thanks to all for the suggestions. Please keep them coming as I bet that this could be helpful for other in the future....that is, if they do a search beforehand. clap.gif

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Hey, I just moved from "Newer Member" to "Member" and I barely even felt the difference. All my previous posts changed, also. Interesting!

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Four responsive (helpful) posts out of a total of thirty posts isn't what I was expecting but it is diagnostic of the cast of characters. 4/30 is about failing if we were being graded. I see that you all (well, most of you on a bad day) have a sense of humor about things. Unfortunately, I had my sense of humor radiated and excised and have not found a transplant, as of yet.

Maybe the few helpful responses were just so thorough that no one else could add to the list of things to bring.

Thanks! wink.gif

 

I'll be leaving Brown Motor Works in Pomona at 2PM on Wednesday prior to Torrey, overnighting in Mesquite, NV and arriving in Torrey around 2PM on Thursday. Show up and ride with me/us. Apart from your riding gear, bring your casual clothes and something warm in case a chill sets in. Inexpensive rainwear is always good, too. If you have spare spark plugs, an alternator belt and a used (but still good) throttle cable you'll be set. I and the rest of those leaving at that time will have just about everything else.

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Yo Nando.

 

Now explain what a joy it is to change that throttle cable in a parking lot in the dark while drunk people mill around you offering helpfull hints tongue.gif

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Yo Nando.

 

Now explain what a joy it is to change that throttle cable in a parking lot in the dark while drunk people mill around you offering helpfull hints tongue.gif

 

Was that you looking over my shoulder and doing all that yakking? grin.gif

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I'll be leaving Brown Motor Works in Pomona at 2PM on Wednesday prior to Torrey, overnighting in Mesquite, NV and arriving in Torrey around 2PM on Thursday. Show up and ride with me/us. Apart from your riding gear, bring your casual clothes and something warm in case a chill sets in. Inexpensive rainwear is always good, too. If you have spare spark plugs, an alternator belt and a used (but still good) throttle cable you'll be set. I and the rest of those leaving at that time will have just about everything else.

 

That sounds like an offer that I cannot refuse. I am just wondering why I would need a throttle cable, etc... for a 07 RT with a few thousand miles on it.....but I will trust the recommendation.

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PhillyFlash
I am just wondering why I would need a throttle cable, etc... for a 07 RT with a few thousand miles on it.....but I will trust the recommendation.

 

It's the first rule of BMW:

Rule #1 - If you don't bring it, you'll need it. (DAMHIK)

 

Clutch cables, throttle cables, and the elusive poly-V belt (aka alternator belt) don't fail frequently, but when they do, it's often at a very inopportune moment. Or, one of your buddies who you're riding with won't have one and his will fail. Of course, you could always rely on the kindness of strangers, but you've already assessed the group mentality around here.

 

 

Additional things to bring to Torrey:

Your inner child. A weekend at Torrey is like a trip to the circus, an amusement park, or a carnival. The roads we ride are thrill rides for bikers (especially if you like to ride at a spirited pace), and the scene at the Chuckwagon or at Killer's Fun House are almost like sideshow attractions (see Wurty, the Sheep-Boy). I have a sense of wonderment each time I go, and there are still times when my eyes almost pop out from the beautiful scenery that abounds the area. We're really all just a bunch of kids seeing old friends and meeting new ones, and if you come with that kind of attitude it will be hard not to have fun. It's even better than band camp. As a matter of fact, this one time, at Torrey.....

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ericfoerster

As a matter of fact, this one time, at Torrey.....

 

 

Good man Howard, another cigar for you. thumbsup.gif

 

What happens in Torrey stays in Torrey.

 

Wurty stories are an exception to the Torrey rule

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As a matter of fact, this one time, at Torrey.....

 

 

Good man Howard, another cigar for you. thumbsup.gif

 

What happens in Torrey stays in Torrey.

 

Wurty stories are an exception to the Torrey rule

Makes me think of the movie Fight Club. "The first rule of Torrey. There is no Torrey."

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PhillyFlash
Otherwise: canteen, knife and flint will suffice.

 

Ah, another Man Vs. Wild fan. We haven't had to drink our pee at Torrey......yet. But ya never know what may happen if Killer takes you on a back road ride. Ain't that right, Whip? grin.gif

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