Jump to content

Replacement tire after only 550 Miles


crashtap

Recommended Posts

dopeslap.giffrown.gif

I have been thrilled with my R12RT, new this spring. But . . . after 550 miles I pick up a small nail in my rear Bridgestone. Take it to my trusty dealer, and he gave me my wake up call for this week: "You don't repair even a small hole on your tire buddy, you only got two to work with as it is." I've been lucky enough all these years to not have to replace a punctured tire, at least since the days we ran with tubes. Anyway, I can't believe how I didn't know this! I assumed you put a good rope patch right in that hole and get back on the road. Shoot. Anyone have a different opinion? (by the way, these Bridgestones seem to be perfectly suited to the R1200RT, in my opinion.)

Link to comment
russell_bynum

Bah. I've ridden thousands of miles at speed on plugged tires.

 

Your dealer's lawyers/insurance company makes him say that stuff.

 

Use a Stop-n-go or similar plug to get you back on the road. Then, remove the tire and patch it from the inside.

Link to comment
Bah. I've ridden thousands of miles at speed on plugged tires.
+1

 

Small nail hole in the center of the tread? Repair it correctly, no worries.

Link to comment

He's listening to his liability lawyers. Do a proper job of plugging it.

 

If you are not comfortable with that, then remove the tire, rough up the area inside around the hole and grind down any internal ridges (use a dremel with a grindstone), and apply a standard automotive self vulcanizing patch intended tor "radial tire" use, then hammer the patch into intimate contact with the inside of the tire.

 

I have done this with previous tires on my bike, and after many thousands of km, the patch was on there like the day I applied it. You couldn't tear it off.

 

Throwing out a perfectly good tire at 500 miles, just because of a nail, is absurd!

 

Bob.

Link to comment
Lone_RT_rider
Bah. I've ridden thousands of miles at speed on plugged tires.
+1

 

Small nail hole in the center of the tread? Repair it correctly, no worries.

 

I have to chime in and agree on this one. I have ridden thousands of miles on plugs, to include my SS1000 for my Iron Butt Certification. thumbsup.giftongue.gif

 

Shawn

Link to comment

I have also plugged without problems. Just keep an eye on the pressure daily. I've heard that sometimes the steel belts in the tire cut the plug and cause a slight leak.

Link to comment

That's the same thing I was told when I got a flat on the rear tire of my Ulysses, with just over 500 miles on it. Seems like such a waste to trash a tire with such little on it, but beats taking chances.

Link to comment
russell_bynum
I have also plugged without problems. Just keep an eye on the pressure daily. I've heard that sometimes the steel belts in the tire cut the plug and cause a slight leak.

 

That could be an issue with the temporary plugs you install on the side of the road. But if you take the tire off and patch it from the inside, that's not a problem.

 

Personally...I've never bothered to do that...I just use the Stop-n-go plug and forget about it. But if you're worried about it, the internal patch is probably the smart way to go.

Link to comment

Well Mr Murphy has a way of changing all of our best made plans. So for my 2 cents worth I'd plug it along side of the road till you could find the correct size and then replace it. Sure it will PROBABLY last but whats your peace of mind worth let alone your safety? I don't enjoy riding the bike briskly wondering if all will stay together when I should be concentrating on the business at hand. Guess I wouldn't let the 500 mile wear cloud my judgement, I've seen many riders want to get that last 500 or 1K out of a tire rather than just getting a new one, let's face it at some point you will be getting a new tire so why not now before bad goes to worse. Just my personal viewpoint, as I don't buy the cheapest helmet either. Cheers, Ralph

Link to comment
but whats your peace of mind worth
I guess around $200. smirk.gif

 

I really don't understand why people fret about this so. I have seen countless accounts of a properly repaired tire running to the end of its service life with no problems but have yet to see even one first-hand account of same causing an accident. Lots of riders repair their tires... where is the carnage?

Link to comment

Just yesterday I got a puncture on my 8 month old Z6 with 60% left on it. Second flat in 9 months. Had to use the plug tool with the 10 year old "special glue" from BMW. The goop had solidified into a stretch rubber band by now....not good. The plug held, but I had the tire replaced with a new one. I can take a chance when it's just me, but now my GF wants to 2up and I'm not willing to take a chance with a plugged tire with her on the back. crazy.gif

Link to comment

I have to say I beat you on the milage thing. I had thirty four miles on my 03 1150rt when I picked up a nail on the way home from buying the bike. I had it plugged at a local gas station, went back to the dealer & had it replaced. Now after saying that, I plugged a friends tire in northern CA using the bmw plug kit. He rode three thousand miles home, & he still has the tire on the bike . That was three years ago. So I guess the real question is, is he a frend or was I taken by the dealer? smile.gif

Link to comment

I've run a couple of near new rear tires past 10,000 miles after repairing punctures. I had both repaired from the inside with a plug/patch. Never a problem with either tire.

Link to comment

diferent spin, I run Avons, which has a road hazard policy. After 1653 miles, picked up a screw. Replaced for FREE.

Does Birdgestone have that policy??

Link to comment

Naw, no hazard replacement policy from Bridgstone. First question I asked my dealer. That being said, I know now that I should have taken that old tire home, and fixed it for a spare. After reading everything here, I would feel comfortable doing a repair myself. Problem was, these new tires and wheels are not good for a DIY demounting and mounting, gotta have the right equipment. A new item for my wish list.

Link to comment
I have to say I beat you on the milage thing. I had thirty four miles on my 03 1150rt when I picked up a nail on the way home from buying the bike. I had it plugged at a local gas station, went back to the dealer & had it replaced. Now after saying that, I plugged a friends tire in northern CA using the bmw plug kit. He rode three thousand miles home, & he still has the tire on the bike . That was three years ago. So I guess the real question is, is he a frend or was I taken by the dealer? smile.gif

You were "taken" by the dealer's fear of lawsuits. Next time, err on the side of common sense. If patched (or plugged) PROPERLY, the tire is perfectly safe. Personally, I prefer the peace of mind that results from spending an hour or two to patch it properly from the inside.

 

Bob.

Link to comment

I agree with the Plug & Patch thing and have seen some guys with several plugs at one time. I tend to feel that if you have more than one plug in close proximity to another then there may be integrity issues to deal with. Weird but so true that almost all flats are rear, Why? Would everyone feel the same repairing front vs. rear? Probably very little diffrence but personally I would feel to uneasy about it to ride like I would w/out the front plugged / patched!

Link to comment

Weird but so true that almost all flats are rear, Why?

 

The front tire kicks the debris up, setting it up to puncture the rear. That's what I've always been told, anyway.

 

Chris

Link to comment

I have a friend who is a mechanic at the local Japanese m/c dealer. He told me he has NEVER purchased a tire, as he just takes the ones off customer's bikes after they are told they MUST replace the tire due to a puncture.

Link to comment

Do most of you guys use a flat patch on the inside of the rear tire, or do you use that combination patch that is round and has a protruding male part that fits down into the puncture hole itself?

Link to comment

Don't fret over the wisdom of plugging your tire; fret over whether you have the right type of oil in your bike grin.gif.

 

Kidding aside, I wouldn't worry about plugging my tire unless there was a big hole or ragged gash in it. If I could get a good seal with the plug and cement, then I won't worry about it.

Link to comment
...apply a standard automotive self vulcanizing patch intended tor "radial tire" use ...

 

Spot on; inside patch. I would not feel comfortable on a plug-patched tire for anything other than emergency use, although I've been told by tire guys that those patches seal up as solid as the original tire itself.

 

I haven't heard anyone mention two things: Where the hole is, and the general condition of the tire means something in the decision. I'd replace a tire that's 2/3's worn and patch the almost-new 500 mile tire. I believe that ANY tire with damage that breaches the side walls must be replaced.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...