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rglassma

Question For Dirt Rider - Oil - '07 K1200r

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rglassma

Hello All,

 

I have a '07 K1200R Sport with just over 40K miles on it.  It will be time for an oil change in about 2K and with all the talk about BMW changing their recommendation on oil to 5w40, I am a bit confused (plus I would rather not spend 18.00 on a quart of oil if at all possible.).  The owners manual basically calls for mineral oil.  As you are aware, there are many different types and weights of motorcycle oil available for our bikes.  I have 5 quarts of Amsoil 20w50 oil sitting on the shelf lonely and waiting to be used.   I have the following questions:

 

1) What would be the potential down side of using this  for spring / summer riding in the K1200 engine/tranny

2) What about going back to conventional oil like valvoline or castrol.  That stuff can be had now for less than 5.00 per quart.

3) What would be the harm in changing to a 10w40 oil like quicksilver of other major brands of synthetic in this case?

 

The bike had a major service before I bought it at just over 36K and 5w40 was used.  I do not usually ride my bike hard.  I live at high altitude (above 5K feet), usually stay below 5K RPMs, This is meant to be a summer fun bike more than anything else.

 

Your thoughts would be apreciated.

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dirtrider
16 minutes ago, rglassma said:

Hello All,

 

I have a '07 K1200R Sport with just over 40K miles on it.  It will be time for an oil change in about 2K and with all the talk about BMW changing their recommendation on oil to 5w40, I am a bit confused (plus I would rather not spend 18.00 on a quart of oil if at all possible.).  The owners manual basically calls for mineral oil.  As you are aware, there are many different types and weights of motorcycle oil available for our bikes.  I have 5 quarts of Amsoil 20w50 oil sitting on the shelf lonely and waiting to be used.   I have the following questions:

 

1) What would be the potential down side of using this  for spring / summer riding in the K1200 engine/tranny

2) What about going back to conventional oil like valvoline or castrol.  That stuff can be had now for less than 5.00 per quart.

3) What would be the harm in changing to a 10w40 oil like quicksilver of other major brands of synthetic in this case?

 

The bike had a major service before I bought it at just over 36K and 5w40 was used.  I do not usually ride my bike hard.  I live at high altitude (above 5K feet), usually stay below 5K RPMs, This is meant to be a summer fun bike more than anything else.

 

Your thoughts would be apreciated.

 

Afternoon rglassma

 

The biggest oil (qualification) on your K bike is the wet clutch.

 

I don't have a K1200R  riders manual handy here but you need to (should anyhow) use a motor oil that won't harm your wet clutch. So using regular synthetic or even regular automotive  type oil's can have additives in them that are not good for the wet clutch. 

 

Some regular motor oil's are OK & some are not so you either should stick with BMW's recommendation or do a lot of research on the additive package that is in the oil.

 

That Amsoil 20w50 (if motorcycle oil) is probably OK with your wet clutch but is on the thick side to allow proper clutch release when cold. 

 

You don't need to use the BMW oil but really should find an oil that meets all the BMW viscosity, additives, & wet clutch protection  requirements.

 

 

 

 

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rglassma

This is all motorcycle oil that I am referring to.

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dirtrider
53 minutes ago, rglassma said:

This is all motorcycle oil that I am referring to.

 

I just looked up your 07 K 1200 bike & it states—

 

Lubricant = Castrol GPS10W-40 (SAE 10W40 ;API SG; JASO MA)

 

 Oil grades= Mineral engine oils API classifications SF to SH.

 

Permissible viscosity classes SAE10W-40≥-4°F(≥-20°C), Operation at low temperatures SAE15W-40≥14°F(≥-10°C)

 

So you need a mineral based oil that carries a MA (wet clutch) classification in either 10w40 or 15w40 that meets an SF, SG, or SH API rating .

 

You could probably live with a semi-synthetic oil that meets the  SF, SG, SH API rating as long as it also carries the MA wet clutch rating.

 

For the most part automotive engine oil's are backwards compatible but that isn't always true in the motorcycle world so a more recent rated SN or SM oil might not contain the correct additive package to also meet the older SF, SG, or SH higher (anti-wear-additive) ZDDP requirements.

 

The important requirements are (an MA) wet clutch rating, should meet the API SH, SG, or SH basic rating (if anything above the SH rating then you REALLY need to do some research to be sure that it also qualifies as a SF, SG, or SH rated motor oil.

 

I haven't looked in a while but Castrol used to offer a 4-T, 10w40 API (SG) rated (MA) motorcycle oil at a very reasonable price. (looks to be  (MA-2)  rated now).

 

4T_Motorcycle_1L_10W40.jpg

 

 

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rglassma

That or valvoline is what I use in my RT.  I know that the prevous owner of this bike was sold on using the synthetic 5w40 at bmw. Do you see an issue at reverting back to dino oil in this case?

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dirtrider
25 minutes ago, rglassma said:

That or valvoline is what I use in my RT.  I know that the prevous owner of this bike was sold on using the synthetic 5w40 at bmw. Do you see an issue at reverting back to dino oil in this case?

 

Afternoon rglassma

 

Shouldn't be a problem changing back to conventional oil.  A GOOD up-level synthetic probably has a slight edge over conventional oil in a bike that uses the same oil in the engine/transmission due to (GOOD) synthetic oil having a better shear resistance when run through the transmission gears but otherwise no big deal.

 

In most cases about all you give up is slightly less viscosity range (you probably wouldn't want (or couldn't even find)  a 5w40 conventional oil due to the added  polymers needed to get that wider viscosity range. (more polymers =  more shear prone).

 

What a good up-level synthetic usually offers is a longer mileage between changes but few riders are brave enough to take advantage of that trait. Synthetic also handles higher operating temperatures better but on a water cooled engine that usually isn't an issue either.

 

Unless comparing to a very specific  (high ZDDP containing  synthetic) then the older formula conventional SG oils (like the Castrol 4-T) probably offer more actual engine (metal to metal)  protection  than most newer SL, SN, SM synthetics. Most synthetics gain it back in  longer change intervals, slightly higher heat handling , & less shearing.    

 

In modern motorcycle engine oils it is more about the wet cutch protection & the  additive package than about conventional or synthetic naming.

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rglassma

Thank you very much for the info.  Great information.

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rglassma

I am giving the Quicksliver synthetic (Mercury Marine) 10w40 motorcycle oil a try. It is a couple bucks more per quart then the 4T or valvoline, but it should give me less wear and a longer change interval.  We shall see.  Any experience with it?

 

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Skywagon

rglassma….I'm curious why you would choose Quicksilver over Castrol?  Just curious....Availability or a thought that it would be better in some way.

 

Thanks...

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dirtrider
14 hours ago, rglassma said:

I am giving the Quicksliver synthetic (Mercury Marine) 10w40 motorcycle oil a try. It is a couple bucks more per quart then the 4T or valvoline, but it should give me less wear and a longer change interval.  We shall see.  Any experience with it?

 

 

 

Morning  rglassma

 

I can't find much in the way of useful specifications on that  Quicksliver synthetic, it might be OK or might just be using the Mercury Marine Quicksilver age-old name to appeal to some market segments (old marketing trick).

 

I don't know anybody that uses it,  without more data available & some unbiased testing I sure wouldn't use it myself.

 

What are you basing your statement of-- "should give me less wear and a longer change interval" on?  

 

Common sense tells me-- that,  (if) it was an above average motorcycle oil with stellar test data, &  above average ZDDP content then we would see (& read about) a LOT of motorcyclists using and/or recommending  it. 

 

 

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rglassma

https://www.quicksilver-products.com/powersports/motorcycle/engine-oils/

 

https://www.cycleworld.com/2015/03/11/land-speed-quiksilver-lubricants-to-support-queen-of-speed/

 

http://goqcrew.com/quicksilver-powersports-lubricants-and-latus-motors-racing-extend-partnership-in-2017/

 

ABOUT QUICKSILVER POWERSPORTS LUBRICANTS:

While the Quicksilver name may not be instantly recognizable in the motorcycle world, the brand has been the world leader in delivering uncompromising parts, accessories, and engine oils to the recreational marine industry for nearly 70 years.  In fact, the world’s largest engine manufacturer in the marine market only trusts Quicksilver.  Quicksilver uses this trusted expertise in formulating oils for some of the harshest engine operating environments and diverse engine types (from 2HP outboards to over 1,700HP race engines) to now support motorcycle, ATV/UTV, PWC, and certain specialty niche racing engines.  Quicksilver is a proven and winning choice to deliver no nonsense and hype-free performance, protection, and peace of mind.  Learn more at www.quicksilver-products.com or www.goQcrew.com

 

 

https://www.snowest.com/2012/09/mercury-quicksilver-unveils-line-of

 

 

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dirtrider
25 minutes ago, rglassma said:

 

Morning  rglassma

 

I already looked at that info but not a much USEFUL info there. Seems like a lot of marketing hype with few actual  facts or specs to back up the marketing hype.

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rglassma

Seems reasonable to me.  I can always return it.

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rglassma

Here is the label. 

20190703_074738.jpg

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rglassma

The specs seem what they should be.  What do you think?  I have read comments on other forums including bobtheoilguy from folks that like it.  I haven't seen any UOAs yet though.  The only UOAs I have found were using the Boat products.  They were more than acceptable.  I am not going to race this bike and the high rpm usage is minimal.  So I am confident that it will be ok.

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