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Grrrrr......... Someone stole our credit card number, again!


Bud

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What a PIA. We just got new ones less than two weeks ago. :dopeslap:

 

How else do you expect me to pay for new tires for my track bike. :lurk:

 

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What a PIA. We just got new ones less than two weeks ago. :dopeslap:

 

How else do you expect me to pay for new tires for my track bike. :lurk:

 

Well, if I had known it was you I would have approved the charge. :whistle:

Edited by Bud
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Missouri Bob

Have you given the card to someone where it was out of your sight, as at a restaurant? In two weeks, I would think that there would be a very small number of suspects.

 

Bob

 

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Dave McReynolds

I suppose there is a bright side to all this. At least those companies with which you had automatic renewals won't be able to automatically renew unless you provide them with your new cc #. After all these years, it still galls me that I can't just notify my cc company that I want to cancel an automatic renewal. I have to either get the renewal company to cancel it, change the number on the card, or cancel the card.

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Lately, I've been using my MasterCard more often, which is provided through Citi. For online and phone transactions, they offer "virtual" card numbers which are great for controlling automatic renewals and one time purchases on websites. You can limit the amount that can be charged against the number as well as the expiration date. The actual charge appears on your regular bill, and the virtual number is useless if it is misappropriated.

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Can you trace your purchases back since your new card arrived? Did you use an unsecured web site? A public wifi? I've got to wonder how to protect from having the same thing happen.

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Richard,

 

As far as I know, we have not. I do not use it except on our secured computers or at a store. Since we got the new cards, we haven't used them anywhere that would require them to be out of our hands.

 

BTW when we traveled Canada last spring, the restaurants brought a remote card reader to the table, you put in the tip amount and it printed the receipt right there. Pretty neat stuff.

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Dave McReynolds
Richard,

BTW when we traveled Canada last spring, the restaurants brought a remote card reader to the table, you put in the tip amount and it printed the receipt right there. Pretty neat stuff.

 

They have that in CA now too. You just push the 10-15-20% button and it will calc the tip automatically. Except....one place we went to had already added in a service charge to the bill! Not sure why I went over the detailed items on the bill the next day; I guess it just didn't seem right to me for some reason. It wasn't completely easy to do, because the items were abbreviated, but finally we came down to one item neither of us could remember ordering with an abbreviation that wasn't obvious to us, which turned out to be the service charge. The tip we added on was clearly at the end as "tip." It made my wife so mad she went back to the restaurant and demanded a refund of our tip, even though with gas and time wasted, it probably wasn't worth it. The guy at the front desk tried to talk her into getting a credit toward future meals instead, but given our feelings about the matter, we probably won't go back. Which is a shame, because other than being cheated, the food and service were great.

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Your card does not have to leave your sight, or even your hand. Card reader hardware at gas pumps, checkout lanes, etc are everywhere and very hard to tell that they are in place. Keeping your cards in a metallic cover or one that is rated to keep readers from accessing it are a good idea, and while you will never know if they worked your problems with fraud will go down.

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...BTW when we traveled Canada last spring, the restaurants brought a remote card reader to the table, you put in the tip amount and it printed the receipt right there. Pretty neat stuff.

 

They've had that in Canada for quite a while now. Also, all cards are chip-enabled, but unlike their recent introduction here in the U.S., they don't make you sign, just enetr your PIN on a keypad.

Edited by marcopolo
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Joe Frickin' Friday
Keeping your cards in a metallic cover or one that is rated to keep readers from accessing it are a good idea, and while you will never know if they worked your problems with fraud will go down.

 

You have to get pretty close for an NFC reader to capture your credit card info; you'd probably know it if someone was swiping a scanner over your butt-cheek or your purse.

 

Although credit card fraud can be a little inconvenient if you're left cardless until a new one arrives, you aren't typically responsible for the damage, so there's not a lot of motive for you, the account holder, to go to extremes to protect against fraud.

 

As you've noted, the card doesn't have to leave your sight. Skimmers can capture it with ease (they can even be installed right at a well-monitored checkout). This is strong incentive to avoid using your DEBIT card anywhere but your own bank (as I do), where cameras are closely monitoring the ATM. If there's fraud against your debit card, it's your money that's tied up until things get sorted out; if there's fraud against your credit card, it's their money that's tied up.

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That right there is why I don't debit.

We've had issues w/the CC, but fraud protections have worked.

Good luck, Bud.

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I just read that some restaurants in CA will now be charging a wage surcharge in addition to your meal cost in those cities which have adopted a $15 minimum wage.

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Along similar lines, our 18 y.o. daughter is in Ireland this week with two of her friends for spring break. Her phone was stolen last night. They tracked it to a house and knocked on the door (that was probably not smart). The owners said they didn't have it. Go figure. Shortly there after, the phone was turned off. Police report filed and Verizon contacted. I'm still waiting on more details. But, what are the odds she gets that phone back? :mad:

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szurszewski

Too bad about the phone!

 

My wife left her shiny new iPhone on a shelf in the grocery store in Jackson, TN yesterday about six pm. Didn't notice until after the place was closed. I was on my way to retrieved it this am when I got a call from her phone. It had just been found on the shelf in the store. Very lucky for her.

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Dave McReynolds
Certainly a political statement by the restaurant.

 

Not sure how well it will go over.

 

Not well at all if it's some tiny footnote on the menu or some dimly lit sign behind the cashier that people would tend to overlook unless they scrutinize their bill carefully. If it is publicized enough that people notice it before they pay their bill, I would imagine many people will take it out of their tip, reasoning that since waiters are now getting a living wage, they don't need as much tip. For many years, restaurants were allowed to pay less than minimum wage and tips were a essential part of waiters' compensation.

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Too bad about the phone!

 

My wife left her shiny new iPhone on a shelf in the grocery store in Jackson, TN yesterday about six pm. Didn't notice until after the place was closed. I was on my way to retrieved it this am when I got a call from her phone. It had just been found on the shelf in the store. Very lucky for her.

 

Along those same lines. Nancy got into a red VW Routan at a local store. When her key wouldn't work, she realized it wasn't ours. Got out, came home. I get a call on my cell from her phone. The van owner recognized the names in Nancy's contact list. I got home and said "Nancy, where is your phone? Dunno". I said "I know and you have to go pick it up!"

 

Small town story.

Edited by Bud
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Along similar lines, our 18 y.o. daughter is in Ireland this week with two of her friends for spring break. Her phone was stolen last night. They tracked it to a house and knocked on the door (that was probably not smart). The owners said they didn't have it. Go figure. Shortly there after, the phone was turned off. Police report filed and Verizon contacted. I'm still waiting on more details. But, what are the odds she gets that phone back? :mad:

 

Surly you're not implying anything dishonest is happening at the address? Agree - zero. They know the phones been tracked, no doubt it's no longer at that house.

 

Agree with Bud - Zero chance. Hope it turns out otherwise.

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Along similar lines, our 18 y.o. daughter is in Ireland this week with two of her friends for spring break. Her phone was stolen last night. They tracked it to a house and knocked on the door (that was probably not smart). The owners said they didn't have it. Go figure. Shortly there after, the phone was turned off. Police report filed and Verizon contacted. I'm still waiting on more details. But, what are the odds she gets that phone back? :mad:

 

Hope you got good news on the phone. While in Ireland, perhaps a first hand intensive study comparing and contrasting the festive differences in the celebration of St Pat's Day would help to ease the loss of the phone. In order for such a study to be recognized, it goes without saying that local adult beverages would need to be sampled in ample portions. . . strictly for posterity reasons of course.

 

EDIT: Hope she doesn't miss her flight!

Edited by workin' them angels
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Well, there is good news :clap: and I guess she beat the odds. The phone disappeared while they were at a pub near campus in Limerick. She says she thinks it fell out of the case, but not really sure when. mmmm :S

 

After tracking it to a house and filing the police report (who wouldn't do anything because the phone was subsequently turned off), one of their friends who is attending the school posted it on one of the school's social media sites. They got a hit a couple hours later from a girl who said she had it. She had no idea how it got there, but she found it in her backpack. :dontknow: She couldn't contact anyone, because she couldn't get passed the pin.

 

I'm guessing Kelsey probably carelessly left it somewhere in the pub and a kid snatched it up. Then wondered later what they were going to do with it. I don't know?

 

Anyway, they made it Dublin yesterday and started their St. Patty's day early. They went to visit Guinness and Jameson yesterday. (that's my girl, I taught her something :grin:). Here's a couple pics from the recently reacquired phone....

iuF5bwqJYu5bBQMCq5ghoskhCcki47u5NPBEPxUepWiY-donTLWb99DVwmAYwyMnvblEK-Pp3MHRxA=w360?=.jpgpR_MrP3JAnMOghcFRpFUfns1nCd4Jvc5GfbD28ehbbmCU-nM1nt5jrk1g7_OEvP7vmqV7fEELubsfQ=w800?=.jpg

 

 

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Well, there is good news :clap:

 

 

Maith thú. That's just good parenting right there. 18 year old + Guinness = good outcome on this fine day.

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Interesting timing, as I got a replacement Amazon/Chase card about 2 weeks ago, and a week later got a warning e-mail from Chase that it had been used twice at gas stations in California. They immediately canceled the card, and I had a replacement with a different number 2 days later.

 

One reason I switched to Chase a few years ago is that their security is so good. In 2013 I tried to purchase ~$15 worth of things at a CVS in a dicey neighborhood of Oakland, CA, and the purchase was declined. I received both a phone call and an e-mail about a questionable charge. When I called, they put me through a 5-minute security audit, apologizing all the way for the inconvenience. I told them I thought it was wonderful, not an inconvenience at all.

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