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Dry Clutch .... what is there that need to get used to?


Redman

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Have seen/heard discussion about needing to get used to the dry clutch, or need to do this or that different than a wet clutch.

What?

 

I have had the typicall UJM wet clutch (multi plate, in engine oil) since 1979, and now the 02 RT (single plate, dry).

 

I haven't noticed much different, well, not that I can attribute to being dry clutch rather than wet clutch. Other than it doesn't drag when oil is cold like the a wet clutch will (if quite cold, with a wet multiplate clutch, will have to have brake on when first put in gear).

 

I gather that maybe do not want to "slip" it as much as a wet clutch when getting underway.

Oh, other thing I noticed, is typical UJM clutch plates I can change myself in about aqan hour or so. I know that is different than RT clutch, where anything involved with the clutch is 10hours shop labor, justs to get at it and put back.

 

SO... what is it that someone like me, with UJM experience, needs to know about operating the dry clutch....?

 

 

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SO... what is it that someone like me, with UJM experience, needs to know about operating the dry clutch....?

 

 

Afternoon Redman

 

Basically the big difference is in how the dry clutch sheds heat from slipping (they don't do that very well). Just limit your clutch slipping at high RPM's high torque & all will be good with your dry clutch.

 

With a good old wet clutch you can hold the RPM's elevated & use the gray slippage zone of your wet clutch to control bike movement & control at full lock. (don't do that with a dry clutch)

 

You can still slip your dry clutch but do it sparingly & only at low engine RPM's & low power.

 

Just remember when it comes to a dry clutch -- slippage = heat & heat can kill a dry clutch.

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The only difference for me is that replacing a wet clutch on a UJM takes a few hours (depending on number of tea breaks ;) ) while replacing a dry clutch on a boxer is a multiple days job and I still have nightmares aligning two halves of a GS without workshop crane. :rofl:

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Don't abuse (hard drag race starts for example) a dry clutch as others have alluded the repair is a pain. For this inconvenience you get to run proper hypoid gear lube in your transmission instead of engine oil! Also you engine oil isn't heated, contaminated or broke down by shearing loads of the gears or the clutch it really wasn't designed for. :grin:

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Thanks All.

 

So main difference is that it cant disapate aas much heat, so don't slip it as much, especially not at higher rpms.

 

I always, even with wet multiplate clutch, have avoided the newbie habit of raising the rpm then starting to let out clutch.

WHat I have tried to do is let out clutch to the start of the friction zone and give some throttle at same time, but not so much throttle as to raise the rpm too much, then balance giving throttle and clutch, so don't raise rpms much above idle, and get underway, in about 1 1/2 or 2 seconds to have clutch fully engaged and then continue giving more throttle.

 

So that seems consistent with what you guys are saying.

Eh?

 

.

 

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I'm pretty sure you've driven a manual transmission car or truck. Those vehicles have a dry clutch. Treat your BMW bike's clutch like you would the one on a car or truck and your good to go.

 

 

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The shift should be faster than the time you might spend thinking about the shift.

Not trying to sound weird but the bike will pull from low rpm's at start and run much more than most think it will in 1st or 2nd at very low rpm's.

Ever see a police rodeo?

Now they do wear the clutch out sometimes, but when they figure it out you see themdoing incredible things.

At higher rpm's it is just as quick as you can do it, IMO.

Probably not explaining it well, but just do it as the commercial said.

Your question was a very common one from new beemer riders and most found that if they just worked on fast and smooth the issue went away very quickly.

Low speed just takes trust and throttle input.

Best wishes.

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....also, make sure your clutch is properly adjusted. They tend to wear much faster when left unadjusted. I suppose that's another difference between wet and dry.

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....also, make sure your clutch is properly adjusted. They tend to wear much faster when left unadjusted. I suppose that's another difference between wet and dry.

 

Afternoon kalali

 

The OP has a 2002 1150RT so that bike has hydraulic clutch activation & those continually self adjust (no mechanical adjustment available)

 

There is a hand lever position adjustment but that has no effect on actual clutch adjustment.

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....also, make sure your clutch is properly adjusted. They tend to wear much faster when left unadjusted. I suppose that's another difference between wet and dry.

 

kalali,

 

Thank you for your useful suggestion. While Redman, the original poster, has an R1150RT others reading this thread have other models which could require adjusting the clutch.

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