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Pulling ABS pump


Bob_Minor

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Just wondering from those that have done this...

 

Is it necessary to totally drain the brake fluid as described in the BMW repair manual? I'm at that step and wondering if it's totally necessary.

 

If it is necessary then is there a substitute for the "brake bleeding device" as described in the manual? I'll buy a vacuum bleeder if necessary, just wondering if it's really needed. On hold until I hear.

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I don't think it is necessary for a brake fluid change.

You can just do a standard bleeding from the top down and from the rear brake fluid reservoir.

But if you are doing a install of a new or rebuilt unit, you may need to use a vacuum bleeder. Even if you use a vacuum bleeder, you will still have to do several manual pump and bleed cycles, to make sure there is no air in the system.

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If you can insert some plastic plugs, to prevent the fluid from leaking out during transport, you won't have to drain it.

My replacement pump (from BMW) came with plugs and partly full of fluid.

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Yes it will, but you can catch it with some rags or plastic bags.

It will be a slow drain, as the rest of the system is closed and that creates a vacuum, preventing a rapid draining.

 

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Evening Bob

 

You really don't have to drain any part of the brake system as it will pretty well self drain when you disconnect the lines (even if you quickly plug the lines it will drip some brake fluid)

 

I will say that it is in YOUR & YOUR BIKE's best interest to drain the system before removing the controller as brake fluid is fantastic paint remover & plastic dash destroyer.

 

Any fluid that drips down can ruin any paint it contacts (like engine silver & trans black.

 

You are going to have to re-bleed the entire system anyhow once the replacement controller is installed as there will be air in the system.

 

 

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Hey DR, I was hoping you'd chime in. So should I follow the BMW procedure exactly; i.e., retract the pistons and vacuum bleed the system? Or are there any shortcuts to this that can adequately drain most of it?

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Evening Bob

 

I usually just attach a small hose to the wheel bleed nipples (to keep fluid off the wheels) then open the wheel bleeders & drain the fluid into a bottle.

 

Not all will come out of the ABS controller so still plug off the fittings after removing the brake lines.

 

The piston retraction is not needed to drain but does help to set proper reservoir fluid height after controller replacement & bleeding.

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Thanks DR. I think I saw a post where you said you can get plugs at an auto parts store. These are for the controller (pump) side?

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Don_Eilenberger
Thanks DR. I think I saw a post where you said you can get plugs at an auto parts store. These are for the controller (pump) side?
I'm not DR - but plastic golf tees work just fine for the lines. Dunno - new hydraulics always come with plugs installed - if you're friendly with a service department you could ask if they have some kicking around. IIRC - there are 4 lines you have to disconnect.
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  • 2 weeks later...

If you put a block of wood between the grip and the brake lever and use a wire tie to pull the lever back to the block it will close the port off in the master cylinder and not allow the fluid to run out. It will also hold the fluid in the lines from the mc to the hcu. You can also make something to apply the rear brake to hold that fluid as well. I have been a car mechanic for 30 years and use this trick to keep brake fluid from draining from the mc when opening the system to replace a part.

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Don_Eilenberger

One more small comment - there is a function on the GS-911 to activate the ABS pump to help bleed it on reinstallation. If you have a GS-911 - that's worth doing (or can find someone who would loan one that wouldn't mind you using up one of the 10 VIN# slots allowed on the enthusiast model.)

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One more small comment - there is a function on the GS-911 to activate the ABS pump to help bleed it on reinstallation. If you have a GS-911 - that's worth doing (or can find someone who would loan one that wouldn't mind you using up one of the 10 VIN# slots allowed on the enthusiast model.)

 

 

Evening Don/ Bob

 

You don't really need a GS-911-- just bleed the front as usual, then bleed the rear from the rear brake pedal as usual-- THEN, turn the key on & spin the rear wheel with your foot (or have someone else do it)-- then a quick bleed of the rear using the front brake lever & rear wheel spinning. (Using the front lever with rear wheel spinning runs the ABS pump)

 

Then another quick re-bleed of the rear from the rear pedal & you're done.

 

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Don_Eilenberger
One more small comment - there is a function on the GS-911 to activate the ABS pump to help bleed it on reinstallation. If you have a GS-911 - that's worth doing (or can find someone who would loan one that wouldn't mind you using up one of the 10 VIN# slots allowed on the enthusiast model.)

 

 

Evening Don/ Bob

 

You don't really need a GS-911-- just bleed the front as usual, then bleed the rear from the rear brake pedal as usual-- THEN, turn the key on & spin the rear wheel with your foot (or have someone else do it)-- then a quick bleed of the rear using the front brake lever & rear wheel spinning. (Using the front lever with rear wheel spinning runs the ABS pump)

 

Then another quick re-bleed of the rear from the rear pedal & you're done.

 

Funny - I think I came up with that quite a few years ago - pretty much by accident. I think I posted it to the R1200R forum, and perhaps the MOA hex/cam forum. True - it sounds just like what the GS-911 does, but it does require 3-4 hands to do it whilst bleeding the brakes (unless you have speed-bleeders installed.)

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True - it sounds just like what the GS-911 does, but it does require 3-4 hands to do it whilst bleeding the brakes (unless you have speed-bleeders installed.)

 

Morning Don

 

 

No extra hands or speed bleeders required. Just use a tight fitting hose on the rear bleeder nipple, then place the open end of that hose in a small bottle or jar & have it go all the way to the bottom of the container.

 

Then put enough brake fluid in the container to keep the bottom of hose covered (or bleed the fronts into the container first to put some fluid in it).

 

Then place the container just above rear bleed nipple level (ie keep the fluid level in the container slightly above the rear bleed nipple height)

 

Then open the rear bleeder, turn the key on, then operate the front brake lever & spin the rear wheel with your foot. (when done just close the bleeder).

 

The fluid in the bottle with the hose in the fluid acts just like a check valve & the container height above the rear bleed nipple height keeps the open bleed nipple/hose length from sucking in those small air bubbles at the bleed nipple threads.

 

Try it-- works great!

 

 

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I put barbacks on my 2013 BMW R1200R and I needed to replace the upper brake line. I put the new line on and used the bottom banjo fitting like a bleeder tightening and loosening it while I pumped brake fluid thru the line. After that I tightened the banjo fitting and then bleed the front and read brakes. I used the tip from Dirtrider to turn the back wheel to get the ABS pump to run and it did. I did this about 5 times. The brakes feel solid. How do I know that all of the air is out of the ABS unit?

 

Thanks

Roger L

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I put barbacks on my 2013 BMW R1200R and I needed to replace the upper brake line. I put the new line on and used the bottom banjo fitting like a bleeder tightening and loosening it while I pumped brake fluid thru the line. After that I tightened the banjo fitting and then bleed the front and read brakes. I used the tip from Dirtrider to turn the back wheel to get the ABS pump to run and it did. I did this about 5 times. The brakes feel solid. How do I know that all of the air is out of the ABS unit?

 

Morning Roger L

 

That is difficult to tell UNLESS can remember exactly how far the front brake lever moved at what hand squeeze pressure before.

 

The good news is: eventually any air in the upper part of the front system will work it's way back up into the master cylinder. The rear should be OK as the rear system is separate from the front as the linking is both electrical & isolator valve, not direct hydraulic. (ie air in the front can't get into the rear)

 

What I usually do is bleed them like you did--then ride the bike for a while to move any trapped upper air up. Then find a gravel or dirt & do a few front lever ABS stops to dislodge any trapped air in the accumulator system. Then do a quick re-bleed looking for signs of air in the bled fluid.

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