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What are they thinking?


Sonor

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All too often we see someone that just doesn't understand you can not just purchase a bike and ride it as if you know what you are doing. Case in point: Today while on my way to work I came upon a four way stop with lights. I sat at my red light looking across at a guy on a bike wearing a T-shirt, sneakers, and jeans. Being an ATGATT I was going through the usual stuff in my mind of what would happen if he had an accident which thankfully he did not. But then he got his green to cross in front of me and go to my right. As he went through the corner he was taking it very wide and sitting like he was in a lazy boy recliner. My hope is that I do not read about him in the papers later this summer.

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I'll never forget a guy who was in my Illinois MSF class. He had bought a brand new BMW and was waiting to ride it as soon as this weekend class resulted in his newly minted M class license designation. We all tooled around the course on the bikes provided, little 250cc that felt like a Goldwing to most of us. We took our written test on the last day.

 

He failed, as did 1/2 of the class. Some peeps find out they don't have whatever logic and knowledge they need even as a beginner to get started. Other's never progress very far. I know I would say I wasn't proficient until I was a year into my 3rd bike, the RT. It was mostly due to the riders I met who rode BMWs. Not only did they tend to know their stuff, but they worked at it with track days, etc. Getting that RT was the best move I ever made, other than the one where I decided it was time to get off the back of someone else's bike.

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szurszewski

My wife took her MSF class in Anchorage late one May. One of the other students, who came in with zero experience but also with a bike already purchased, was planning to ride up to Fairbanks, alone, the day after the class. It's not a super long trip, three or four hundred miles, but not the best road, pretty lonely for most of it with lots of places to run off into the brush, and pretty unpredictable weather that time of year. My wife says all the instructors, as subtly/off to the side as possible, tried to discourage this as a first ride...but the student was committed. My wife says they didn't do great in the class, and were the only one to drop their bike on the range. I always wonder if they went through with the trip and how it turned out. I suppose it was probably fine. Hopefully.

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Guest Kakugo

If you come around here now, you'll see 90% of the riders dressed like they are going to the beach and wearing cheap open face helmets. The usual exception are sportsbike riders who are always in full racing attire.

 

Considering now there are all sorts of Summer clothing and well ventilated full face helmets available, it's just a matter of mentality. As an acquaintance of mine said "People have no problem spending 15-20 grands on a bike but balk at the idea of spending more than 100€ on their riding gear"... possibly because you can fully finance a bike but riding gear has to be paid in cash! :grin:

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The usual exception are sportsbike riders who are always in full racing attire.

 

:rofl:

 

That would be the exception here! The guys who buy sportbikes around here think a full face helmet is ATGATT. Just saw one this morning on our beltway (ring road in Euro speak?). FF Helmet, shorts, T-shirt and Nike's. All he needed to have with him fit into the drawstring backpack on his back. Silently wished him luck as he passed me in my old pickup.

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I'll never forget a guy who was in my Illinois MSF class. He had bought a brand new BMW and was waiting to ride it as soon as this weekend class resulted in his newly minted M class license designation. We all tooled around the course on the bikes provided, little 250cc that felt like a Goldwing to most of us. We took our written test on the last day.

 

He failed, as did 1/2 of the class. Some peeps find out they don't have whatever logic and knowledge they need even as a beginner to get started. Other's never progress very far. I know I would say I wasn't proficient until I was a year into my 3rd bike, the RT. It was mostly due to the riders I met who rode BMWs. Not only did they tend to know their stuff, but they worked at it with track days, etc. Getting that RT was the best move I ever made, other than the one where I decided it was time to get off the back of someone else's bike.

 

What is scary is that one does get their M endorsement but really know very, very little about riding. I didn't. Rode in my early 20's, kids and work prevented further riding. Got older, promised wife and kids I would 1. Take the class. 2. ATGATT and 3. Wouldn't drink and ride.

 

6 months later, on a oil and chip road in S. IL., locked up rear brake and high sided exactly where I was looking. Rookie mistake.

 

I still don't consider myself proficient by any means.

 

But I'm learning my limitations. As a "Flatlander" my lean sensor doesn't allow the same amount of lean as folks who ride in the curves all the time (you too hoons I had lunch with a few days ago, I'm talking about you! :grin:)

 

If we ride in the hills, we slow up proficient riders who just want to get past and get on with their fun.

 

I did get to within 1/2" of the edge of the tread on the Wee while at the UN, which was really something for me.

 

I also rode the 250's in class. They were so much fun after not ridding for a few decades.

 

But we were all beginners sometime and we managed to get better over time.

 

Sold the Wee yesterday to a guy from LA (Lower Alabama) had a Honda Shadow 1100. Said his son convinced him to gear up as he current rides with an open face helmet and no other gear.

 

 

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Guest Kakugo
The usual exception are sportsbike riders who are always in full racing attire.

 

:rofl:

 

That would be the exception here! The guys who buy sportbikes around here think a full face helmet is ATGATT. Just saw one this morning on our beltway (ring road in Euro speak?). FF Helmet, shorts, T-shirt and Nike's. All he needed to have with him fit into the drawstring backpack on his back. Silently wished him luck as he passed me in my old pickup.

 

I've lived for a while in San Diego years ago and I recall sportsbikes seemed to attract, how can I put this, a peculiar crowd. :grin:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Yesterday in rush hour traffic on my way home I saw a guy on an old Nighthawk, probably a 750 but couldn't be sure. He was wearing flip flops, shorts, a T-shirt, and a full face helmet with the shield up. All I could think as I went by him was, "what is he thinking?"

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I believe in SOTGSOTT, some of the gear some of the time (helmet always). We all take our chances and gauge our safety according to our abilities and experience. Most days, jacket, gloves and helmet. Some days, I'll throw on pants and boots. Depends on how I'm feeling and the roads I'm riding. And I've even ride, by gosh, in shorts, oh my!!

 

Also, this ATGATT stuff, how many wear a Leatt on the streets?, spine protector(not just jacket pads)?, full motoGP protective gear? If not, than ya really aren't ATGATT are ya? You're just sortaGATT or the "accepted" ATGATT ;)

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  • 3 weeks later...
aggieengineer

Exactly. For some folks, sneakers and t-shirts may be all the gear they have. Personally, I take little interest in what other riders wear. I'm busy enough watching out for myself. I do perk up when I see another BMW however.

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