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Cut Tire


mistral

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OK you are out in the middle of nowhere and you suffer a cut tire. No phone reception no way to plug the tire. What would you do in that situation? I doubt a heavy patch would work. I wonder if you could patch the tire and get a tube in it. It could really be a bad situation to be in.

 

Any experiences or thoughts?

 

Thanks.

 

Ron

 

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szurszewski

Are we on a paved road that someone will be along after a time? Or are we out in the middle of the dirt - or somehow on a paved road that no one ever travels?

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Joe Frickin' Friday
OK you are out in the middle of nowhere and you suffer a cut tire. No phone reception no way to plug the tire. What would you do in that situation? I doubt a heavy patch would work. I wonder if you could patch the tire and get a tube in it. It could really be a bad situation to be in.

 

If I'm equipped for plugging a tire, then I'm probably not bothering to carry tools to remove/install the tire, and I'm probably not carrying a tube either. So I'm either walking, or I'm hitching a ride with the first ax murderer who drives by. If I get a ride, I suppose I might remove the wheel and bring it to town with me so I can get a new tire installed.

 

If I am equipped to remove/install the tire, AND I've got a tube or a tire patch kit, AND I'm out somewhere where nobody will be passing by anytime soon, I think numerous wraps of duct tape around the tire and the rim might help hold the tire together when you inflate it. I'd inflate to low pressure (20 psi?) and then ride SLOWLY to town (or at least to somewhere with cell reception).

 

Note that "a really bad situation to be in" may arise not just from tire damage, but from any number of things that could go wrong with the bike to render it inoperable; you're focusing on field solutions for one single failure mode, but there are many others that just don't have field solutions.

 

Worst case, you're gonna be doing some walking, at least to a main road with traffic.

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OK you are out in the middle of nowhere and you suffer a cut tire. No phone reception no way to plug the tire. What would you do in that situation? I doubt a heavy patch would work. I wonder if you could patch the tire and get a tube in it. It could really be a bad situation to be in.

 

Any experiences or thoughts?

 

Thanks.

 

Ron

 

No problem. Turn on my DeLorme InReach satellite messenger, send a text to people I know, gives a map with my exact location and they can email me back letting me know how they can help.

 

Easy Peasy :grin:

 

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I'd get out my walking shoes and get to somewhere that there's cell coverage and make the call find a tire and make the decision on whether to tow or get a tire and and wrestle it on. It's prolly your rear tire, so that's easy enough to remove at the appropriate time. If you have TPS then forget about the tube. Or carry a sat phone

 

You know I wouldn't break down on the side of the road. Tongue firmly in cheek!

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In addition to typical tire plug kit (plus CyclePump compressor), I pack several strings from the Safety Seal kit kept in my Jeep TJ Wrangler. With that, I'd install however many needed to plug the tear, air it up, then ride slowly until reaching a shop for tire replacement.

 

Although the linked kit is intended for offroad 4x4 trail carnage, those string plugs work wonders. Not long ago on one of my local jeep club's weekly trail runs, a member slashed a sidewall on a rock. It took several strings stuffed partly in to stop the leak before that gooey stuff "became one", but he was able to finish the trail and drive home on pavement until he got that tire replaced. Its good stuff...

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So the safety seal kit is basically the gooey string stuff that comes in most plug kits, or is it really much better stuff? I carry a healthy supply of the heavy string plugs.

 

Ron

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OK you are out in the middle of nowhere and you suffer a cut tire. No phone reception no way to plug the tire. What would you do in that situation? I doubt a heavy patch would work. I wonder if you could patch the tire and get a tube in it. It could really be a bad situation to be in.

 

If I'm equipped for plugging a tire, then I'm probably not bothering to carry tools to remove/install the tire, and I'm probably not carrying a tube either. So I'm either walking, or I'm hitching a ride with the first ax murderer who drives by. If I get a ride, I suppose I might remove the wheel and bring it to town with me so I can get a new tire installed.

 

If I am equipped to remove/install the tire, AND I've got a tube or a tire patch kit, AND I'm out somewhere where nobody will be passing by anytime soon, I think numerous wraps of duct tape around the tire and the rim might help hold the tire together when you inflate it. I'd inflate to low pressure (20 psi?) and then ride SLOWLY to town (or at least to somewhere with cell reception).

 

Note that "a really bad situation to be in" may arise not just from tire damage, but from any number of things that could go wrong with the bike to render it inoperable; you're focusing on field solutions for one single failure mode, but there are many others that just don't have field solutions.

 

Worst case, you're gonna be doing some walking, at least to a main road with traffic.

 

Mitch, I just tried to keep the scenario short. I know there are a lot of other things that can go wrong. I try to not think about too many of them. :grin:

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I'd get out my walking shoes and get to somewhere that there's cell coverage and make the call find a tire and make the decision on whether to tow or get a tire and and wrestle it on. It's prolly your rear tire, so that's easy enough to remove at the appropriate time. If you have TPS then forget about the tube. Or carry a sat phone

 

You know I wouldn't break down on the side of the road. Tongue firmly in cheek!

 

You break down, not going to happen. :wave:

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^^^

Hey, I don't own stock in the company... ;)

 

I will say that their product is #1 choice among serious offroaders and rockcrawlers. If you haven't already, watch

and hang in there long enough to get past initial sales spiel until the guy shows differences in those gooey strings compared to competitor stuff. My kit is prox 10 yrs old, yet the strings were still gooey and viable. Even so, I'm gonna order a 2nd kit with enough extra strings to replenish jeep and moto supply.

 

Edit: just now bought a box of 60 strings for $19 shipped since they can be used with other plug tools...

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I'll offer you a different point of view. It works in a pinch, but have to be careful. When we do bush flying, we don't carry spares and there is virtually no way to patch the tire if cut. So the trick I learned is to fill the tire with as much grass as I can poke in it. I thought it an old tale until it happened to me. I was able to spoon one side open, jam it full of hay (got lucky on finding hay), fired up and made it back.

 

I wouldn't want to ride a motorcycle at freeway speed, but I would rather ride it at 10mph than hoof it home and leave the bike behind.

 

 

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^^^

Hey, I don't own stock in the company... ;)

 

I will say that their product is #1 choice among serious offroaders and rockcrawlers. If you haven't already, watch

and hang in there long enough to get past initial sales spiel until the guy shows differences in those gooey strings compared to competitor stuff. My kit is prox 10 yrs old, yet the strings were still gooey and viable. Even so, I'm gonna order a 2nd kit with enough extra strings to replenish jeep and moto supply.

 

Edit: just now bought a box of 60 strings for $19 shipped since they can be used with other plug tools...

 

I think you got stock! Pretty good testament 10 years old. I think I will get some. Thanks for the info.

 

Ron

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I'll offer you a different point of view. It works in a pinch, but have to be careful. When we do bush flying, we don't carry spares and there is virtually no way to patch the tire if cut. So the trick I learned is to fill the tire with as much grass as I can poke in it. I thought it an old tale until it happened to me. I was able to spoon one side open, jam it full of hay (got lucky on finding hay), fired up and made it back.

 

I wouldn't want to ride a motorcycle at freeway speed, but I would rather ride it at 10mph than hoof it home and leave the bike behind.

 

 

I could only be so lucky as to have a bail of hay or any hay at my disposal! If it works it works. There was an article in a magazine where a lady filled her tire with her clothes. It was on an old Harley way back in time, but it worked. I guess in a pinch I can strip down naked and fill my tires. :dopeslap:

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The Rocketman

These suggestions work real well if your bike has a center stand. If you own 2 R1200C's like I do, and only have a side stand, you're basically SOL with a non-pluggable flat. Unless you want to prop the bike's $2600 muffler up on a cinder block, assuming you can find one. You can then mount your new tire, but your shiny, chrome muffler is toast.

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I'll offer you a different point of view. It works in a pinch, but have to be careful. When we do bush flying, we don't carry spares and there is virtually no way to patch the tire if cut. So the trick I learned is to fill the tire with as much grass as I can poke in it. I thought it an old tale until it happened to me.

 

That's all well and good until the DEA catches up with you.

 

;)

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^^^

What I was thinking too... :grin:

 

I'll stick with my "poke" using string plugs

while he has a "toke" from those "stuffings"

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szurszewski
I'll offer you a different point of view. It works in a pinch, but have to be careful. When we do bush flying, we don't carry spares and there is virtually no way to patch the tire if cut. So the trick I learned is to fill the tire with as much grass as I can poke in it. I thought it an old tale until it happened to me. I was able to spoon one side open, jam it full of hay (got lucky on finding hay), fired up and made it back.

 

I wouldn't want to ride a motorcycle at freeway speed, but I would rather ride it at 10mph than hoof it home and leave the bike behind.

 

 

Awesome. This was going to be my suggestion as well if we were out in the middle of nothingness (on a road, I'd just pull the wheel and get a ride into town...unless I got really bored waiting). I have never tried it on a bike tire, but I learned it during the five years we spend on the arctic tundra - main application being four wheeler tires, but I did know some bush pilots who said the same. For the four wheelers, it was used more often when a tire spun loose of the bead and you didn't have a compresor with you - not a whole lot of things on the tundra that will puncture a tire...

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szurszewski
These suggestions work real well if your bike has a center stand. If you own 2 R1200C's like I do, and only have a side stand, you're basically SOL with a non-pluggable flat. Unless you want to prop the bike's $2600 muffler up on a cinder block, assuming you can find one. You can then mount your new tire, but your shiny, chrome muffler is toast.

 

Well, if you don't have a cinder block, or you do have one but you don't think you can balance the bike on it well enough, you could always put it down for a nap. Did that once - or maybe twice - with my airhead when I didn't have anything to put under the center stand (which was required to get the back tire out without removing the fender or other parts).

 

Is that going to cost you less chrome than the muffler? I don't know - but it's certainly another option.

 

 

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I think Mitch's points very relevant, unless you are the type to carry a lot of extra tools and equipment there's no practical way to cover for all of the countless possible but unlikely eventualities. Plus in my experience a patch/repair on a cut tire won't get you much further anyway. If there's no cell coverage then it's time to pull out the SPOT.

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^^^

What I was thinking too... :grin:

 

I'll stick with my "poke" using string plugs

while he has a "toke" from those "stuffings"

 

But he will only be "one toke over the line:. :grin:

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the weeds (not weed) in the tire trick is fairly well known among bicyclists as well. Needed it once, but that was before I'd learned about it.

 

the "weed" in the tire trick is a new one to me. But it has some possibilities. For instance, if you had some weed in your tire, you prolly wouldn't care too much about whether you were gonna be able to fix the thing in the first place. And having it fixed is pointless, if you don't give a damn about whether it's fixed. Certainly the weed "repair kit" is much smaller and lightweight than a tire repair kit.

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cris nitro
These suggestions work real well if your bike has a center stand. If you own 2 R1200C's like I do, and only have a side stand, you're basically SOL with a non-pluggable flat. Unless you want to prop the bike's $2600 muffler up on a cinder block, assuming you can find one. You can then mount your new tire, but your shiny, chrome muffler is toast.

 

On a dirt bike this is easy, you can use the side stand as a prop and put a stick, rock whatever under your right side of the swing arm to hold the wheel off the ground. That's for the rear wheel and I don't think I would be propping up a BMW that way, but sometimes you got do what you got do. Front wheel, that's harder.

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