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They are out to get ya from all directions!


dirtrider

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I would bet since it is a student driver, the company that supplies the teacher (if it is not a parent) is also liable in this case.

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Dennis Andress
I would bet since it is a student driver, the company that supplies the teacher (if it is not a parent) is also liable in this case.

 

Like, why didn't the instructor put on the brakes!!

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Mrs. Caddis
Like, why didn't the instructor put on the brakes!!

 

The driver ED cars our sons used did not have instructor brakes like when I took driver ED. Most likely this car did not either.

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The student driver probably panicked after getting hung out in the intersection, and threw it in reverse. Interesting, as it looks like he/she had to give it a little extra gas to actually get over the top of the motorcycle. :S

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Bill_Walker

From what the guy said on Reddit, I believe the driver was driving under a learner's permit, but was not taking a paid lesson at the time. At least here in California, a person with a permit is allowed to drive a vehicle when accompanied by a licensed driver over age 18 (IIRC). I would assume the law is similar in other states.

 

Not only did the driver not look behind the car, he/she even failed to back up in his/her original lane!

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Not only did the driver not look behind the car, he/she even failed to back up in his/her original lane!

 

Funny, I noticed that!

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szurszewski
From what the guy said on Reddit, I believe the driver was driving under a learner's permit, but was not taking a paid lesson at the time. At least here in California, a person with a permit is allowed to drive a vehicle when accompanied by a licensed driver over age 18 (IIRC). I would assume the law is similar in other states.

 

Not only did the driver not look behind the car, he/she even failed to back up in his/her original lane!

 

 

Part 1: My take from reading this was the same as yours - they had (what in Oregon would be called) an instructional permit, but were not a "professional" driving lesson. (If they were, and it were one of my instructors, they would be absolutely fired - there was plenty of time to stop that car by various means - even a parent should have been able to get the "kid" to stop with or without an instructor brake).

 

Part 2: I'm not surprised they didn't look back - I'm pretty sure they had no intention of going back - certainly not like that. (Well, that, and having watched MANY drivers back up - experience and novice - it's pretty UNcommon for people to look back before they start moving back.)

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Part 2: I'm not surprised they didn't look back - I'm pretty sure they had no intention of going back - certainly not like that. (Well, that, and having watched MANY drivers back up - experience and novice - it's pretty UNcommon for people to look back before they start moving back.)

 

And that situation will only get worse when back-up cameras become mandatory (2016 I believe). People will be heads-down looking at the camera picture instead of turning around and getting the big picture.

 

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szurszewski

 

Part 2: I'm not surprised they didn't look back - I'm pretty sure they had no intention of going back - certainly not like that. (Well, that, and having watched MANY drivers back up - experience and novice - it's pretty UNcommon for people to look back before they start moving back.)

 

And that situation will only get worse when back-up cameras become mandatory (2016 I believe). People will be heads-down looking at the camera picture instead of turning around and getting the big picture.

 

While I 100% agree that you get a better field of view (big picture) by turning around, I'd be happy if folks with the back-up cameras would at least look at the dang screen - most folks I get to observe don't really look at that either - at least not until after they are already in motion.

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I hit both at times in FORD trucks when coming to a stop. It is my contention that the peddles are a bit closer together than the GM products that I normally drive. It does give a bit of pucker power when the engine revs while coming to a stop.

 

I can only imagine how this would feel to a newbie.

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I hit both at times in FORD trucks when coming to a stop. It is my contention that the peddles are a bit closer together than the GM products that I normally drive. It does give a bit of pucker power when the engine revs while coming to a stop.

 

I can only imagine how this would feel to a newbie.

 

Don't drive a newer Passat. My wife got a 2013 and when I drive it I have to be careful hitting the gas as sometimes I catch the brake pedal. It wasn't made with size 14 shoes in mind. Never had a problem like that before.

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foundationapps

On reactions / training. I propose that driver trainer in most countries lacks training on higher stress and emergency procedures.

 

A panic reaction (like hitting the wrong peddles) occurs solely as a result of no exposure to a particular situation. We all know that you will NOT do the right procedure at the most needed time, you will panic.

 

Hand / eye coordination fails, fine motor skills fail, major muscle groups do not react with accuracy and speed. Vision is affected, all that stuff. Went to HALO school in 1985. High Altitude / Low Open (skydiving with a lot of crap on in all weather conditions). You practiced emergency procedures over and over and over, several times a day. On jump day or before and between multiple jumps, you practice and rehearsed the old "shake once, shake twice, look grab, look grab, pull, pull" procedure over and over. From low altitude opening of 2000' or lower, you close with the earth at 120 mph. Fatal impact will occur if you don't do that procedure right the first time. At high pull altitudes you obviously have more time to make decisions. Had a fatal parachute malfunction at 18,000' once but had about 4000' feet to try and make it work before going to the reserve and make it to the drop zone because of the 60 mph pusher winds at altitude.

 

Sorry, my mind wanders to the good old days.

 

That video to me looked like an unplanned BAD reaction accelerated to panic, which terminated in the vehicle drifting to the wrong lane, impact with the bike was probably inevitable given her situation and previous exposure at the time.

 

Hence: Driver training in the US sucks. Virtually no one would pass the Japanese riding exam in the first time, many on the second go around. Add to that smartphone terminal human guidance systems parked on the steering wheel of 50% or more of the population, ADDED to unskilled drivers, ADDED to systems designed to prevent crashes, but aren't doing much to help the problem, to a public that is for the most part playing life's "The Walking Dead" with vital signs mode.

 

Sorry for being wordy.

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