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Can Someone Much Smarter Than Me . . . (breaking in a new engine)


Dave Stephens

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realshelby

Well, he may do just fine with this procedure. His statement:

 

"I wrote "Break-In Secrets" after successfully applying this method

to approximately 300 new engines, all without any problems whatsoever."

 

Could also be applied to the millions of owners that followed manufacturers break in guidelines spelled out in the owners manual.

 

I'll leave it at that.....

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Dave Stephens
Well, he may do just fine with this procedure. His statement:

 

"I wrote "Break-In Secrets" after successfully applying this method

to approximately 300 new engines, all without any problems whatsoever."

 

Could also be applied to the millions of owners that followed manufacturers break in guidelines spelled out in the owners manual.

 

I'll leave it at that.....

 

Good point indeed!

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David:

 

I've heard that argument before, years ago. My bike was delivered to me with 11 miles on the odometer, probably the person who set it up had some fun with it. Don't know if redlining is the way to go, but running it normally and varying the speed via shifting is probably important. I broke in my bike riding around the Kettle Moraine forest here in SE Wisconsin.

 

The dealer did the oil change at 600 miles, and I just recently did the oil change at 6200 miles. The oil was remarkably clean, and oil usage was less than 1/3 quart, maybe much than that since I didn't see where the oil level was after the dealer changed it at 600 miles. Don't baby it, but don't torch it either would be my recommendation, warm it up and vary the rpms.

 

Jeff

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Dave Stephens
David:

 

I've heard that argument before, years ago. My bike was delivered to me with 11 miles on the odometer, probably the person who set it up had some fun with it. Don't know if redlining is the way to go, but running it normally and varying the speed via shifting is probably important. I broke in my bike riding around the Kettle Moraine forest here in SE Wisconsin.

 

The dealer did the oil change at 600 miles, and I just recently did the oil change at 6200 miles. The oil was remarkably clean, and oil usage was less than 1/3 quart, maybe much than that since I didn't see where the oil level was after the dealer changed it at 600 miles. Don't baby it, but don't torch it either would be my recommendation, warm it up and vary the rpms.

 

Jeff

 

I think that's the way I'll go Jeff. Thanks for your input.

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David:

 

Good luck, you will love the bike, and you'll have a lot of fun on those twisty Tennessee roads. Also, see the discussion we got going on oil. I asked myself, why should I pay $117 for the dealer to change the oil when this bike's oil change is about as simple as it gets.

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Afternoon davidtn

 

I'm not sure about us being any smarter than you. You have the good sense to come a BMW specific web site asking for advise (that seems pretty smart to me)

 

OK, now on your break-in question-- notice I didn't say ENGINE break-in. There is WAY more to a new vehicle break-in than just the engine. What's good for the engine isn't always the best for the transmission or final drive break in.

 

Using the break-in procedure you referred to probably won't hurt a new (properly assembled) boxer motorcycle engine. In fact some of what that link says makes sense. (but only for the engine)

 

You have to keep mind that if you start with extreme accelerations too early in the break-in cycle you chance ending up with a some noisy transmission gear ranges or a final drive that whines at certain speeds. Remember you are also breaking in the final drive hypoid gear set & transmission gears.

 

So my (personal) recommendation (based on owing a number of new BMW boxer motorcycles, with NOT A ONE, being an oil burner, even in the early miles) is to follow the BMW riders manual on new vehicle break-in. (but see below)

 

Follow BMW break-in procedure but keep this in mind while doing so.

 

While keeping within the BMW recommended procedure, never ride at the same engine RPM, or vehicle speed, for very long (ie keep changing the vehicle speed & engine RPM's).

Don't abuse it, just keep the throttle moving & keep shifting up & down a reasonable amount. If you want to flat out kill a proper boxer break-in then just hit the freeway & set the cruise control & cruise along at 60 mph in high gear on level ground for a couple of hours straight.

 

The best info I can give you is find the hilliest back road you can find to break the bike in on. You want modest uphills & l-o-n-g downhills if possible. Climb the hills with power but keep within the BMW recommendations, shift up & down a lot (just one gear up or down works good). DON'T EVER LUG A NEW ENGINE with less than a few hundreds miles on it.

 

Now the important info-- once you get to the top of the hill do a lot downhill throttle roll-offs (little acceleration then short coasting). On the downhill accelerate slightly but then completely close the throttle & coast a bit then back on the throttle (the idea here is to increase engine vacuum with the costing to help the rings seat. Change gears often & vary the engine RPM's.

 

For break in, a few heating & cooling cycles is far better than riding it 300 miles at one time. But once started make sure it goes far enough to get it fully heated (includes final drive & transmission gear oil). (no 3 minute engine runs)

 

If you want to buy a boxer that burns oil until 25,000 miles then just find a dealer that starts your new bike every morning & rides it 100 feet out front of the dealer then does the same putting back at night (don't do that on a new bike, EVER).

 

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cris nitro

DR's point about deceleration is important and this helps seat the rings properly and give you good compression.

 

":Now the important info-- once you get to the top of the hill do a lot downhill throttle roll-offs (little acceleration then short coasting). On the downhill accelerate slightly but then completely close the throttle & coast a bit then back on the throttle (the idea here is to increase engine vacuum with the costing to help the rings seat."

 

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Dave Stephens
Afternoon davidtn

 

I'm not sure about us being any smarter than you. You have the good sense to come a BMW specific web site asking for advise (that seems pretty smart to me)

 

OK, now on your break-in question-- notice I didn't say ENGINE break-in. There is WAY more to a new vehicle break-in than just the engine. What's good for the engine isn't always the best for the transmission or final drive break in.

 

Using the break-in procedure you referred to probably won't hurt a new (properly assembled) boxer motorcycle engine. In fact some of what that link says makes sense. (but only for the engine)

 

You have to keep mind that if you start with extreme accelerations too early in the break-in cycle you chance ending up with a some noisy transmission gear ranges or a final drive that whines at certain speeds. Remember you are also breaking in the final drive hypoid gear set & transmission gears.

 

So my (personal) recommendation (based on owing a number of new BMW boxer motorcycles, with NOT A ONE, being an oil burner, even in the early miles) is to follow the BMW riders manual on new vehicle break-in. (but see below)

 

Follow BMW break-in procedure but keep this in mind while doing so.

 

While keeping within the BMW recommended procedure, never ride at the same engine RPM, or vehicle speed, for very long (ie keep changing the vehicle speed & engine RPM's).

Don't abuse it, just keep the throttle moving & keep shifting up & down a reasonable amount. If you want to flat out kill a proper boxer break-in then just hit the freeway & set the cruise control & cruise along at 60 mph in high gear on level ground for a couple of hours straight.

 

The best info I can give you is find the hilliest back road you can find to break the bike in on. You want modest uphills & l-o-n-g downhills if possible. Climb the hills with power but keep within the BMW recommendations, shift up & down a lot (just one gear up or down works good). DON'T EVER LUG A NEW ENGINE with less than a few hundreds miles on it.

 

Now the important info-- once you get to the top of the hill do a lot downhill throttle roll-offs (little acceleration then short coasting). On the downhill accelerate slightly but then completely close the throttle & coast a bit then back on the throttle (the idea here is to increase engine vacuum with the costing to help the rings seat. Change gears often & vary the engine RPM's.

 

For break in, a few heating & cooling cycles is far better than riding it 300 miles at one time. But once started make sure it goes far enough to get it fully heated (includes final drive & transmission gear oil). (no 3 minute engine runs)

 

If you want to buy a boxer that burns oil until 25,000 miles then just find a dealer that starts your new bike every morning & rides it 100 feet out front of the dealer then does the same putting back at night (don't do that on a new bike, EVER).

 

Great advice and makes perfect sense. I pick it up tomorrow afternoon (Friday) and will let the festivities begin! :clap:

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Great way to break bike in.... Currently doing that to my 2015 RT LE. Learned this from a site from a Japanese M/C engineer in 2006. The diference between a good and bad break in is about 10%! Difference in h.p. Its how i break in bikes now.

 

We arent told this because poor break in procedures (not doing this right) damage bikes. Key is bike must be very warm, say 20 m riding warm as we are talking drive train as well.

 

Positive gradual increase and decrease in rpms, different gears. It tightens the rings and drive up.

 

NO crazy winding on the throttle.

 

Research this... You will be surprised.

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The smart thing to do is follow manufacture recommendations otherwise you may void the warranty and ruin the engine. I bought my 2014RTLC 11-1-14 , breaking in a new engine in the cool months is a plus . I bought a used 2004RT , rode it for 4 1/2 years put 90,000 miles on it and traded it on my new RTLC . I loved my 04 but it is no comparison to the 14 . What a terrific ride , best bike I ever owned in 50+ years of riding . I hope you enjoy yours as much as I enjoy mine remember keep it rubber side down .

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