Jump to content

SmartPhones


Sonor

Recommended Posts

Okay, late to the game. Why? Because until one month ago the only carrier in my area only provided one bar of signal when the leaves were not out. Now, the leaves are out and I get two bars so I can make the leap from flip phone to smart phone. All that said, I am looking at the iPhones and Galaxy 5s. I have been told by friends that "cook" their phones to get the Galaxy or Nexxus and that my wife should get the Fisher Price of Smart Phones, the iPhone. I want to hear what the general consensus is: what smart phone do you use on a Verizon signal and why?

Link to comment

I currently have a Motorola Droid Turbo on Verizon. It's everything I need. I appreciate the slightly larger screen. Previously I had the M Droid Maxx. I highly recommend these phones.

 

When I originally went "Smart" I was encouraged by Mr. Knapp, who knows that I'm not naturally gifted with an understanding of technology. The Droid format is easy to figure out. There are more Free Apps than I need, but it's nice to know there are so many available. Steve told me that I didn't yet know why I'd prefer a smart phone, but I would find out. It never ceases to amaze me how useful they can be, even if one doesn't use them every moment of every day. ;)

 

These are the apps that I use fairly regularly:

An icon that contains weather, time, alarms and calendar, all in one.

Google Stocks

Seeking Alpha (stocks)

Messaging (texting)

Calculator Plus

Google Maps

Dictionary

Super sudoki

Wikipedia

Smugmug

QR Code Reader

(News icons: Huff Post, local NBC news, BBC News, NPR news, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, CNN)

Magazine: The Economist

Live Camera View (hundreds of security camera views from around the world)

You Tube

Post It Notes

Phone

Google Mail

Chrome

Camera Settings/Gallery

 

I use the phone, camera, texting, email, and alarm the most. I've gotten to the point that I don't take any chances and even have alarms set to remind me to take my pills, call Dad at appointed times each day, and take out the garbage. I believe it's true that giving yourself up to one of these things allows your brain to get mushy, but by the same token it's helping me to avoid saying, "I forgot to........" :grin:

 

Good luck and enjoy your new little friend.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment

I'm not sure what difference the carrier makes in deciding what brand smart phone to get. The signal strength from Verizon would be the same for any phone, wouldn't it?

 

I'm on AT&T and use an iPhone 6. I'm not sure what the reference to Fisher Price was meant to imply, but my iPhone does anything and everything I could ever want. Yes, I've been around techies too, but I've generally found their recommendations to be biased in favour of what a techie would want and not necessarily particularly useful for the "average" user. There are good phones whether iOS, or Android. I chose Apple because we've gradually switched over the last five years to all Apple products (desktop, laptop, phones, tablets etc.). If you want things that work well together, Apple does that. If you want intuitive technology for the average person, I've found Apple products to be that, for a price. There are an incredible number of Apps available for them (as there are for Android phones). Just be aware of the reverse-snobbery recommendations.

Link to comment

We're an all-Apple house, so both my wife and I have Iphones. My advice would be to go to a retailer that has both, handle both, and see which one floats your boat. If you make the 'wrong' choice, most carriers will give you the opportunity to change your mind in a couple of years.

 

I personally don't think there's a lot of difference between the two platforms, and my friends who have Android-based phones have about the same level of functionality when it comes to the apps they use.

Link to comment

I've been an iPhone fanboy for some time, and I currently have an iPhone 6 (128GB). I haven't owned an Android device, but a number of friends and family have, so I have some passing familiarity with them.

 

First, I'd note that the iPhone seems to have reached a level of consistently high performance without any major snafus. Up to this point in my iPhone saga, there was always an issue that popped up at some point that had a noticeable impact on some function for which I used the darned thing. Usually it was fixed within a few weeks, but it was nonetheless an annoyance. That just hasn't happened with my iPhone 6--all the functions work well (and have from the time I took it out of the box), and it's consistently reliable, both on the Verizon network and when roaming. Sound quality and connections to the Verizon network seem to be consistently excellent, even in rural areas where the signal is weak.

 

The major benefit for me is that I also have an iPad and a MacBook Pro, all of which sync with one another (contacts, email, notes, bookmarks, music and other media, etc.) and all have proven to be stable, reliable computing platforms. I know that this sort of synchronization can be done in the Android platform, but Apple makes it all pretty easy and intuitive.

 

I use all the functions you'd normally expect--phone, email, web browsing--and a couple that are unique to Apple products. Chief among those is Facetime, a video calling app. Works great, and it's an amazing, pretty much cost-free, way to keep in touch with people around the world (as long as they have an Apple product). Also--and again this works best if your contacts are also Apple users--it's effortless to create and share photo albums and other files.

 

So, that's it for me: I'm not a Luddite, but I don't want to spend too much time screwing around with my smartphone and other devices to tweak them. Apple offers off the shelf products that cooperate very well with one another and perform at a high level of efficiency.

 

One added benefit, whether it's fully deserved or not, is that iPhones also seem to retain a high amount of value on the second-hand market. Again, I take the easy way out and typically sell my old ones to Gazelle, where the price I get goes a long way toward an upgrade.

 

I really couldn't be happier with my choice. It works well and serves all the purposes I need it to. There may be a better Android phone out there, but I don't see anything that would serve all the purposes for which I use my iPhone, at least not without a considerable amount of effort.

 

Link to comment

If you already have some Apple gear (iPad, Mac) an iPhone is nice because they all get along well. They don't, however, play well with non-Apple stuff. If you don't have any Apple stuff, either one would work fine. I had a Samsung Galaxy Nexus for a couple years and liked it. My wife had an iPhone 4s. It was a bit difficult to share stuff between the phones (mainly the calendar). We both have Macs and iPads. When the contract was up we both got iPhone 6's. I like the 6...it's thinner and lighter and has a bigger screen (only slightly bigger than the Nexus, tho). It's much easier to share stuff now but otherwise not a huge improvement. The newer Galaxy phones are very nice...both our daughters have them and like them. Apple stuff is nice but there are things about it that drive me nuts. I'm a retired software engineer and sometimes get aggravated at the proprietary-ness of all the Apple stuff, I guess years of working with open source stuff spoiled me. Probably not a big deal to most people. Android is a bit more open but still heavily tied to Google.

 

Bottom line...either iPhone or the latest Android phones will do the job. Check them both out and see which one feels best to you.

Link to comment
Dave McReynolds
I'm not sure what difference the carrier makes in deciding what brand smart phone to get. The signal strength from Verizon would be the same for any phone, wouldn't it?

 

I'm on AT&T and use an iPhone 6. I'm not sure what the reference to Fisher Price was meant to imply, but my iPhone does anything and everything I could ever want. Yes, I've been around techies too, but I've generally found their recommendations to be biased in favour of what a techie would want and not necessarily particularly useful for the "average" user. There are good phones whether iOS, or Android. I chose Apple because we've gradually switched over the last five years to all Apple products (desktop, laptop, phones, tablets etc.). If you want things that work well together, Apple does that. If you want intuitive technology for the average person, I've found Apple products to be that, for a price. There are an incredible number of Apps available for them (as there are for Android phones). Just be aware of the reverse-snobbery recommendations.

 

My story too.

 

I already had an iPhone 5S, but my wife qualified for a free upgrade from her old flip phone, so she took over my 5S and I got the new 6.

 

I was fast outgrowing my storage capacity on the 5S (16 gigs?) and had to juggle apps that I didn't use very much. When I loaded the latest version of the op sys, I had to unload a bunch more and reinstall some of them later. My new 6 has 64 gigs, which is still about 2/3 empty, so hopefully will last me for a while. Extra storage doesn't cost that much, so I would recommend getting it, even if you don't know what you're going to use it for.

 

In combo with my iPad, I use the iPhone for email, keeping up with Internet stuff, like this board, reading books, watching movies with the HDMI cable, studying Spanish and Russian, including playing it and music through my truck bluetooth as I drive, keeping track of my bank accounts, taking casual photos, reading the morning newspaper, maps and directions, messages, calculator, Pages and Numbers (which I don't really understand, but functions as a half-a$$ed Word and Excell when I'm not in my office), a few magazine subscriptions, checking the weather, and an app that helps me maintain a good rhythm with my archery shots. I like having my iPad and iPhone in sync, so I can continue reading at the same place when I'm in a line somewhere. If I ever get another computer, it will probably be an Apple so it can stay in sync too. Oh yes, I also make telephone calls.

 

I guess you could say I've become an iPhone/iPad junky, which I would never have guessed about myself 20 years ago. I remember when my wife first suggested I get an Internet connection. I asked her, "What would I do with it?" She said, "Well, you could communicate with people." I said, "Why would I want to do that?"

Link to comment

Several years ago I got a Blackberry "leash" for work. Over time I grew to like it and even some web browsing wasn't too awkward. When I retired I realized my old Razor flip phone wasn't going to cut it so got the first generation iPhone. Nicknamed it "Precious" because I was enamored with how easy it was to navigate and keep up with everything. Tried my wife's Android phone as I tried to assist her with it (kind of like a man teaching his wife anything, it wasn't pretty) and then she tried my iPhone and caught right on. Currently using a 6+ and aside from the awkwardness when using one handed it is pretty much the Swiss army knife of smartphones and I can leave my iPad home when traveling. Apple's commitment to hardware/software advances has been commendable and see no reason that should change.

Link to comment
Okay, late to the game. Why? Because until one month ago the only carrier in my area only provided one bar of signal when the leaves were not out. Now, the leaves are out and I get two bars so I can make the leap from flip phone to smart phone. All that said, I am looking at the iPhones and Galaxy 5s. I have been told by friends that "cook" their phones to get the Galaxy or Nexxus and that my wife should get the Fisher Price of Smart Phones, the iPhone. I want to hear what the general consensus is: what smart phone do you use on a Verizon signal and why?

 

If your provider is not giving you the signal strength you need, complain, and while complaining, ensure your call drops several times. They'll send you a nifty device that you hook into your internet and bampow, you have signal with in your domicile and within the yard area. Since we've gotten the black box, we've not dropped a single call within our home. BTW, we have verizon and they do provide the box for free.

Link to comment

I switched from ATT to Verizon in 2010 'cus travels showed much broader reception range with "V" in in western states remote regions. Bought a Palm Pre+ same time due to promo for free 5GB/mo mobile hotspot on top of unlimited data plan for phone surfing sessions. Hated the phone (dinky slide-out qwerty keyboard and small screen too) but wanted to keep grandfathered plan. So, bought a Samsung GS5 off-contract and was able to migrate unlimited data but not that prior 5GB hotspot feature (for which V charges $20/mo extra). Solution: PdaNet+/FoxFi Key app allows me to use my unlimited smartphone data for external hotspot connectivity to laptop, chromebook or share with others in same way. One key feature in GS5 user reviews was reported greater battery charge hours, which appeals to me much more than typical apps.

Link to comment

+1 for the FoxFi solution. Works well for traveling when it comes time to find a motel for the night. I've never understood the justification for extra charges for the hot spot feature. Why does it make a difference to the carrier if you use your data allowance on the phone or on your laptop through the phone?

Link to comment
szurszewski

One justifcation is that websites know which device you are using and send you content accordingly. For smartphones, on many sites, you get condensed pages with fewer/smaller/lower resolution graphics - same for streaming videos.

 

Which is all to say, if you are visiting those sites on the laptop, you'll use a very noticable more data.

Link to comment
One justifcation is that websites know which device you are using and send you content accordingly. For smartphones, on many sites, you get condensed pages with fewer/smaller/lower resolution graphics - same for streaming videos.

 

Which is all to say, if you are visiting those sites on the laptop, you'll use a very noticable more data.

 

My phone is set to use a non-mobile profile - so there is no savings there. But I'm still paying for X amount of data, which is what they are happy to sell me. I see no reason that the carrier should be able tell me how to use that data. Paying an extra $10/month or so for hot spot capability that may or may not actually be used makes no sense. There might be some justification for restricting hot spots with an unlimited data plan, but I've always had a limited amount available, with high charges if that amount was exceeded. If the carrier is concerned with high data usage, they would be better off prohibiting videos, or simply eliminating unlimited service. Imagine if BP sells you gas for your bike, but says you have to pay more if you think you might carry a passenger.

 

 

Link to comment

^^^

FWIW, I use little of unlimited mobile data and seldom use the hotspot unless travelling which I do much less frequently since moving from SoCal to Arizona's Rim Country.

 

Also to note that iPhone users can't use that FoxFi app without risk of bricking (so I've read) 'cus it was designed for android.

Link to comment
Bill Murray

My wife and I have been with Verizon for a long time. We have been very satisfied with their coverage.

 

Try to get the best smartphone you can afford -- you will likely live with your decision for two years. I am currently using the Samsung Note 4, and my wife has the Samsung 5S. Both are great phones. I prefer having the larger screen that the Note 4 offers. Both phones include a microSD card slot -- I really like having the extra storage space. The Note 4 is the best smart phone I have ever owned. (My previous smartphones emcompassed several generations of Motorola Droid phones).

 

Personally, I prefer the Android ecosystem to Apple. However, if you are already using Apple computers and iTunes, then you may prefer an iPhone.

Link to comment

You're going from a flip phone to a brand new smart phone. It's exactly what I did last year.

 

It's a lot like going from a 1971 VW Beetle, to a 2015 Porsche. What the hell do you care if you go for the Boxster or the Cayman? You're gonna get your socks blown off either way. :dopeslap:

 

 

Link to comment

Well here's the shortened version of the story. V is the only carrier in my area. Used to be no signal after the leaves came out but this year, we acquired two bars. We got Galaxy s5's on Saturday. Got them home, dropped calls. Of course it was raining and should we expect coverage when it is raining? (sarcasm, no need to respond)

Home phone is still needed so we switched to OOMA to save $. Turns out OOMA has an app that uses WIFI to make and receive calls when in a WIFI zone with no cell coverage. So we are comforted that we will actually be able to use these devices.

As for previous attempts with V, they first attempted to sell us a repeater that would mount in our attic. That is wrong anyway you look at it. I am paying for a service that they are not supplying so why should I pay more money for another device just to supply what I am currently paying for? They turned around and said, okay we will give it to you. Then I learned it uses my electricity and network bandwidth as it is a cell to VoIP connection (like OOMA). The difference being, with OOMA I am the only user and I agree to using my cell in this fashion. With V, anyone around the house uses my network to make calls and if I walk up the street I am still without a signal. I eventually said no to V's repeater.

Nonetheless, we are happy with the Galaxy phones.

Link to comment
Well here's the shortened version of the story. V is the only carrier in my area. Used to be no signal after the leaves came out but this year, we acquired two bars. We got Galaxy s5's on Saturday. Got them home, dropped calls. Of course it was raining and should we expect coverage when it is raining? (sarcasm, no need to respond)

Home phone is still needed so we switched to OOMA to save $. Turns out OOMA has an app that uses WIFI to make and receive calls when in a WIFI zone with no cell coverage. So we are comforted that we will actually be able to use these devices.

As for previous attempts with V, they first attempted to sell us a repeater that would mount in our attic. That is wrong anyway you look at it. I am paying for a service that they are not supplying so why should I pay more money for another device just to supply what I am currently paying for? They turned around and said, okay we will give it to you. Then I learned it uses my electricity and network bandwidth as it is a cell to VoIP connection (like OOMA). The difference being, with OOMA I am the only user and I agree to using my cell in this fashion. With V, anyone around the house uses my network to make calls and if I walk up the street I am still without a signal. I eventually said no to V's repeater.

Nonetheless, we are happy with the Galaxy phones.

 

Verizon's amplifier's strength is not going to go throughout the area, just within your local yard. We have it and are glad we do. My neighbors, whose house is less than 20ft away, don't have signal and cannot connect to Verizon's little amplifier. So, only people that come into our house and near yard can actually use the service. So far, we've not had the neighborhood standing in our yard utilizing our service ;)

Link to comment
Turns out OOMA has an app that uses WIFI to make and receive calls when in a WIFI zone with no cell coverage.

 

I'm not familiar with ooma, but your galaxy will do wifi calls all by itself (except you need wifi of course)

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...