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Touring boots you can hike with


RussInParis

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RussInParis

Do these even exist? We're planning a trip to Norway, camping as much as possible, so space will be tight. The boots I have are far too uncomfortable and heavy to hike in. Hiking boots or runners don't really seem to protect enough. For a short trip I would just bring two sets of footwear, but with space so tight it would be great to find a better solution.

 

Anybody have any great ideas?

 

Russ

 

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Guest Kakugo

No matter how hard you try, no motorcycle boot is comfortable to walk in any distance.

Personally I copied what the Germans do: I bought a pair of hiking sandals. Not the flip-flop variety but the ones with a good gripping soil and straps to fasten them. I won't win any fashion award but they can be stored practically everywhere, they take little room and they are a Godsend after 8-9 hours in biking boots.

I paid mine 20€ at a local shop: there are more expensive models (obviously) but since my old lady always threatens to "toss those ugly things in the garbage" why risk? :grin:

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A second pair of footwear is probably the best solution.

 

That said, the Aerostich Combat Touring Lite boots that I bought in 2006 are probably the most comfortable boots I have ever worn — AFTER they finally broke in. Had I followed the advise of the Aerostich sales person, and soaked them in a tub full of hot water for 30 minutes, then worn them until dry, break-in might have taken less than 2 years. They are not light, though, and with each step on a hike, the weight adds up.

 

Have a good trip; I hear that Norway is a fantastic place to visit.

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Alt-Berg in Yorkshire, UK, make hiking boots and motorcycle boots. They use the same footbed for both types of boot.

 

Edit: The Alt-Berg Hogg boot is a motorcycle boot based on a hiking boot. Designed to cover both activities.

 

I have had my Alt-Berg clubman bike boots for five years, they are strong, comfortable and waterproof. I have walked several miles at a time in them with no discomfort. Not as good as a full hiking boot, but a close second.

 

Andy

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I don't know if it exists, but you don't want it. You want the good purpose built boots they have today.

These are two entirely different uses, with different characteristics.

Just change into your hiking shoes. Or boots.

Depending on the type of hike, the terrain, I have two pair that I use.

dc

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I'd bring two sets of footwear. What if your riding boots get soaking wet and need a day or two to dry out? I'd rather have the hiking shoes to wear even without the protection for a day, than wear wet boots.

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Do you have a Walmart in France? I bought a cheep pair of hiking boots to just work on my hillside replant. They are waterproff with gortex and the soles are a little high.The toe part is lower than a regular boot and I tried Riding with them. Great. I touch grown better and they fit under the shifter good and they fell good when they are on. Surprised the heck out of me. I Forgot, they look good to. The name is Ozark Trail. Good luck with your finding.

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The SIDI On-Road Goretex boots have a hiking type sole. Looks just like the Vibram sole that was so common on serious hikers a few years back, but not as deeply lugged. So the traction is excellent. With some hiking socks on they are pretty comfortable for walking and hiking. But being m-c boots, they are tall and relatively stiff and heavy. I'd suggest a pair of trail running shoes. No ankle protection but good grip, they are light and don't take up too much room. (Fill them with socks or skivvies when you pack.)

 

pete

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Peter Parts

Can't say I've ever been too fond of those plastic contraptions for biking boots. Anybody seen solid research on their value? Have another peek at the Hurt Report. And then done any kind of cost/effectiveness judgment?

 

For long trips, I want to protect myself, of course. I use Doc Martens calf-high boots which lace-up. All Docs are made for walking like for LEOs on a walking beat originally. I wouldn't be comfortable for 10 minutes in plastic footwear.

 

Do consider personal-suited arches (AKA orthotics) as a way to make your footwear beneficial. For walking, shoes serve no purpose except to keep a sole under your feet. You read it here first. So good arches make good walking shoes.

 

Ben

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I bought these:

 

Icon Tarmac ventilated boots. They are extremely comfortable to wear and the cushioned sole means I can spend a day walking in them without any grief. As for touring, I've ridden across the continent and back in them, as well as around the NW of the USA.

 

image_36031.jpg

 

I liked them so much, I bought the waterproof version for winter, too. From memory, I had them delivered from the USA for $125USD.

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Bmr Deacon

+1 on the Sidi On-Road. Mine are a touch too big for me because I bought them from the Classifieds on this forum. I wear them with thick wool socks and they were great for a 4000 mile trip round trip to Texas. I camped along the way and did several miles of hiking with family while in Texas. They were most comfortable hiking boots and the waffle sole was perfect for that.

 

The only complaint I have about the On-Roads is that they don't have ankle or shin armor like my BMW boots have. Try some on and you decide.

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Look around at White's. I've always thought they would make a good riding boot that would also be comfortable for many miles on trails. They actually do have a pull on motorcycle boot called the "open road", but I think comfort while hiking would suffer. If it were me, I'd take a "smoke jumper" or the "farmer/rancher" for a riding and hiking combo boot.

 

http://www.whitesboots.com/

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Peter Parts
Plastic, as in Kevlar?

Yes, I think there has been some research on it.

dc

 

Kevlar.... great idea if you are worried about bullets.

 

Kidding aside, safety analysis starts with understanding the hazards, their consequences, their probabilities, what counter-measures work, and the "costs" of the counter-measures. Everybody has soundly-based ideas on each of these issues (even just kind of back-of-the-envelope is better than none)?

 

As a daily rider (often short trips) who falls into paroxysms of laughter when I hear the word ATGATT, "costs" includes all kind of reasons a person might hesitate to put on those crazy looking sweaty boots (unless poser-life appeals to you*).

 

I like the high Doc Martens. I think they are pretty good for most of the hazards of riding and get-offs and they keep the wind off my upper calfs which makes riding less fatiguing. And THAT is an important safety measure on long trips.

 

Think "systems" not advertizing.

 

Ben

 

*lots of good reasons to favor those boots but also some few people like to play Mr. Biker Dress-Up.

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Funny, I thought the 'poser-life' was the one what didn't like wearing any gear. It interferes with the 'image'. Like that shown in the ad.

If you have sweaty feet, it seems like a different issue.

How do they have sweaty feet in Canada?

Is that like they say 'it's too hot for the polar bear'?

dc

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moshe_levy
+1 on the Sidi On-Road. Mine are a touch too big for me because I bought them from the Classifieds on this forum. I wear them with thick wool socks and they were great for a 4000 mile trip round trip to Texas. I camped along the way and did several miles of hiking with family while in Texas. They were most comfortable hiking boots and the waffle sole was perfect for that.

 

The only complaint I have about the On-Roads is that they don't have ankle or shin armor like my BMW boots have. Try some on and you decide.

 

+2! My Sidis lasted well over 100k miles with me touring on my motorcycle. And hiking. And fishing. And snowmobiling. And walking. And just hanging out! SO damn comfortable and durable like an anvil. I would not hesitate to recommend them for riding AND hiking - many miles, with no comfort problem whatsoever. Worked for me!

 

-MKL

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veMy SIDI On Roads did well over 100k and I wore them at work along with walking the woods.

Will arrive back next week with new Vibram soles from resoleAmerica

Never had any wet feet in downpours or puddles.

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RichEdwards

If you are serious about hiking (like in 5 to 20 mile hikes), there is no motorcycle boot made that will come close to a dedicated hiking boot. A good hiking boot gives the proper support, is totally waterproof, has a rugged-slip proof sole, protects the ankle, is cool in hot weather, and is light. I take my Lowa Renegade GTX boots for hiking. I can go 20 miles easily in these boots and they weigh about 50% less than my lightest motorcycle boots. But, like good motorcycle boots, they ain't cheap. Amazon has them for about $210:

Lowa Hiking Boots

Modest hikes of a mile or two I do in motorcycle boots, usually in my Sidi's or my BMW Air boots. If I bring the Lowa's, I have them in a waterproof bag that I bungie on to the top of a side case.

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I have a pair of BMW AirFlow II boots. I have worn them until they have needed to be re-dyed twice. Well over 100,000 miles on the bikes while wearing them. They are without doubt the most comfortable boots I have ever owned. I do not pack any other boots or shoes now when taking bike trips. Make sure you get a pair that fits, and after a few days they'll be broken in for all day use.

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Will arrive back next week with new Vibram soles from resoleAmerica

Never had any wet feet in downpours or puddles.

 

 

I wonder if the resole will change that?

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Hope not, will report.

One reason I chose these folks as opposed to local cobbler

was the experience with type of glue etc.

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Here you go, standard leather combat boots. I've done 25 miles in these carrying 60+lbs in eight hours more times than I care to remember. They are comfortable and should provide enough protection for riding.

 

 

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Paul Mihalka
Here you go, standard leather combat boots. I've done 25 miles in these carrying 60+lbs in eight hours more times than I care to remember. They are comfortable and should provide enough protection for riding.

 

Looks good. Only thing seems missing is being waterproof.

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Peter Parts
Here you go, standard leather combat boots. I've done 25 miles in these carrying 60+lbs in eight hours more times than I care to remember. They are comfortable and should provide enough protection for riding.

 

 

Not quite as high as my Doc Martins but would seem to provide more protection than the usual maybe-ankle-protective boots.

 

But back to evidence. Anybody have some evidence about what works for what mishaps with what frequency? Hard plastic shell, Kevlar, or traditional leather? Lace-up or snaps?

 

Is there value in being high (besides less fatigue from wind)?

 

Ben

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The evidence is in the evolution of mc boot

design.

Traditional available, and modern applications also.

2011-Sidi-Vertigo-Boots-Black.jpg

 

Injury report I linked a while ago pointed out the paucity of protection most mc riders wear on the lower body, including boots.

The recommendation was based on a statistical analysis of injuries

sustained.

Abdominal region also considered underprotected.

 

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Here you go, standard leather combat boots. I've done 25 miles in these carrying 60+lbs in eight hours more times than I care to remember. They are comfortable and should provide enough protection for riding.

 

Looks good. Only thing seems missing is being waterproof.

 

There are combat boots that are waterproof and also insulated. Unfortunately for me, they didn't hike so well. Others have had good luck hiking them, just not me.

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I wear regular Timberland Boots. They're great for riding, hiking, anything really, and are protective and waterproof. They really are perfect once broken in.

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markgoodrich
Here you go, standard leather combat boots. I've done 25 miles in these carrying 60+lbs in eight hours more times than I care to remember. They are comfortable and should provide enough protection for riding.

 

 

Not quite as high as my Doc Martins but would seem to provide more protection than the usual maybe-ankle-protective boots.

 

But back to evidence. Anybody have some evidence about what works for what mishaps with what frequency? Hard plastic shell, Kevlar, or traditional leather? Lace-up or snaps?

 

Is there value in being high (besides less fatigue from wind)?

 

Ben

 

Lacking analysis or CE-type testing, Ben, let's continue the veer off the OP's question and think it through.

 

Crush injuries happen in motorcycle accidents; therefore, toe box protection is implied.

 

Ankles, although now available as replacement parts from medical supply houses, slam into pavement, curbs, trees, etc, implying the utility of ankle armor (armour to you). Most I've seen is hard plastic.

 

Shins encounter all sorts of very hard things in a crash, indicating protection in that area is also useful, i.e. a taller boot is better than a shorter one, and an armored (armoured) one is better than a lace-up Doc Marten or slip-on cowboy boot.

 

Heels, at the moment, are NOT replaceable, thus a very strong heel compartment is an excellent plan.

 

Thick, semi-rigid soles protect not just the bottom of the feet, but also protect the rest of the foot in the event of an impact.

 

None of the above lends itself to useable hiking material, at least not in my mind...my idea of a hike is 15 miles or so, and hopefully several thousand feet up, and back down, so perhaps I am too choosy.

 

Racer boots have all the features I mentioned, other than thick soles, but the soles they do have are very rigid. Many, many brands of "motorcycle" boot lack one or several of the features I've mentioned. I don't wear those brands.

 

As for cost? There is no full-featured motorcycle boot which costs as much as an inspection by an orthopedist, complete with x-rays and ultrasounds, not to mention the burn specialists who work on the missing skin areas. Everyone has their own level of risk acceptance....

 

Back to the original question: my wife and I have taken numerous hiking vacations on the RT (not camping). We pack our hiking boots and other gear in a Cabela's Boundary Waters II dry duffel, strapped to the right sidecase. Works just fine, gives her a place to put a Camel-bak type water bladder, and a sort of arm rest. Completely, utterly waterproof.

 

In case this sounds snide or condescending or sarcastic, it's not.

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markgoodrich

Will arrive back next week with new Vibram soles from resoleAmerica

Never had any wet feet in downpours or puddles.

 

 

I wonder if the resole will change that?

 

Was not a problem with my resoles from them, on a different brand of boot, to boot.

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Boots arrived back from resoleamerica.

ON time.

New soles and a good polish make the SIDI's look new again.

Don't think anything was done that will affect the waterproofness.

+1 for the company and they have multiple styles of factory SIDI soles available.

$90 inc shipping

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2011-Sidi-Vertigo-Boots-Black.jpg

 

I love my SIDI Vertigo. They perform beautifully in a fast get off and are very comfortable on the ride.

 

The following is my opinion, so I don't mean to be disagreeable with anyone who differs. I just feel strongly about this subject.

 

 

Feet sweat and when walking or hiking they need air flow. Have you ever seen folks with that fungus on their nails?

 

I bring good walking sandals (KEEN is one) in the side case. It takes a moment to take off the boots and slip on something that will perform while walking/hiking.

 

For me, a motorcycle boot needs to perform for two situations, the get off and the ride. I want every bit of that boot to be focused on the protection of my feet, ankle and all the lower leg as possible. That means they are very stiff, with little flexibility for walking, let alone hiking. They should fit like a cast and feel about the same.

 

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I've had a pair of Gaerne Oiled Balance boots for about 5 years now. Good protection (not as much as a race boot but very good) and extremely comfortable off the bike. Not sure if I would go for a 'hike' in them but that's what my Vibram Five Fingers are for...

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I have used Asolo Fugitive Hiking boots for years. They work great on the motorcycle - Waterproof & comfortable. I've ridden in very heavy rain & my feet have always stayed dry. I sometimes wear gaiters also. The main purpose of our mc trips is hiking. It provides a lot of flexibility.

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  • 3 weeks later...
RussInParis

Thanks for all the suggestions! I checked out a few of them, visited a local motorcycle discount shop (Daffy Moto), and ended up with a pair of Alpinestar Afrika XCR boots/shoes.

 

I haven't gone hiking in them yet, but I've done hours of walking, and rode with them several hundred kms including through a cloudburst. They stayed comfy and dry (thanks, Gortex).

 

Compared to my fullsize leather riding boots (also Alpinestars), it was a bit of an adjustment to feel air on my ankle, and I was aware I have less protection, but with the RT, the plastic protects from the rain and wind so much I think the tradeoff is worth it.

 

OTOH, weather forecast for our trip to Scandinavia is rain, rain, rain, thunderstorm, rain, etc. for the next two weeks. Doable if you have to, but not so fun for camping and sightseeing, so we're going to push it back to August and hope for at least a few consecutive days of non-rain.

 

Russ

 

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