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New type of engine???


ltljohn

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DaveTheAffable
So what do you engineer types know/think about this concept??

 

 

Brickley Engine

 

I... dunno. In a traditional engine I understand the piston skirt having friction, but for the rest of it there are only two friction points. The wrist pin, and the crank.

 

On the Brickley I counted 4 pivot points, and two shared pivot points per piston. That makes equiv 5 pivot/pressure/energy transfer points per piston.

 

Then again, he's an engineer, and I'm just affable. :)

 

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Calvin  (no socks)

Looks like a nightmare. Design is one thing, manufacture and production is another. Build one, design a valve train that has low friction, get all the bugs out, make it pass emissions without melting. Refine materials for longevity, test and certify. :eek:

 

I have worked on some farked up, complicated beyond belief machinery. Engineers make it work, mechanics keep it working when the real world interacts with the design.....This makes electric cars look good...

 

I'm no engineer...I did stay at a Holiday Inn last night...but it looks like it came from the century before the last century, reminicent of an oil derrick or V-twin.

 

Asbestos underwear on!

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ShovelStrokeEd

Might work at the speeds shown in the video but, piston skirts have a reason for existence. Namely stabilizing the piston in the bore to eliminate ring flutter. I also see a goodly number more pivots in the system than a conventional crank layout. Each of those adds some friction. Also a lot of mass floating around that has to be started and stopped. Maybe less than a conventional engine but, I don't like lots of parts and there are lots of parts in this configuration.

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Might work at the speeds shown in the video but, piston skirts have a reason for existence. Namely stabilizing the piston in the bore to eliminate ring flutter. I also see a goodly number more pivots in the system than a conventional crank layout. Each of those adds some friction. Also a lot of mass floating around that has to be started and stopped. Maybe less than a conventional engine but, I don't like lots of parts and there are lots of parts in this configuration.

 

Those issues are addressed in the text.

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Might work at the speeds shown in the video but, piston skirts have a reason for existence. Namely stabilizing the piston in the bore to eliminate ring flutter. I also see a goodly number more pivots in the system than a conventional crank layout. Each of those adds some friction. Also a lot of mass floating around that has to be started and stopped. Maybe less than a conventional engine but, I don't like lots of parts and there are lots of parts in this configuration.

 

Those issues are addressed in the text.

 

Hmm, he indicates he's reduced the number of connecting rods from 4 to 1. While this may be true in a purely semantic sense, in reality it appears he's just moved the complexity and friction points "above" the single connecting rod. In fact there appears to be many more sources of friction in this design than in a traditional piston - rod - crank design. Based on a picture (even a nice moving one) I can't say if friction is reduced but I'd be skeptical until I saw more than the designer's claims.

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I am no engineer, but that seems like a lot of reciprocating mass to be throwing around the top end.

 

I agree, lots of reciprocating mass. I'm thinking redline will be around 2000RPM. That's stepping bakc to the 1920's in engine performance. Wer already dop this with engines used for pumps genrators, construction equipment.

 

This engine might have some practical application as a low speed positive displacement metering pump that needs a lot of inertia with high viscosity fluids.

 

Newtons Law also tells me that no matter the number of pivot points, you will still likely have a similar amount of friction when trasnfering a force from linear to rotational. So you're only spreading the load form 5 pivots points to 3, which in some cases can increase overall friction.

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I'm sure it's just me, but that video looks a little, um, well, let's call it "suggestive" or "bump and grind-esque."

 

No it's not just you. Somehow that engine animation looks like it should be R rated....

 

--

Mikko

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