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Riding w/o functional ABS?


Dances_With_Wiener_Dogs

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Dances_With_Wiener_Dogs

I'm considering a bike purchase where the ABS doesn't work. To me, it seems like a bigger problem riding a bike that has ABS but doesn't work, as opposed to not having ABS at all. Since the brake fluid passes through the modulator, is it a worrisome thing?

 

I'm also considering a bike that needs a new clutch and input shaft. Both this one and the ABS-problem bike would get repaired, but a new ABS control unit is cheaper than a clutch/input shaft. Cheaper, unless it strands me on the road somewhere between there and here.

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I'm considering a bike purchase where the ABS doesn't work. To me, it seems like a bigger problem riding a bike that has ABS but doesn't work, as opposed to not having ABS at all. Since the brake fluid passes through the modulator, is it a worrisome thing?

 

I'm also considering a bike that needs a new clutch and input shaft. Both this one and the ABS-problem bike would get repaired, but a new ABS control unit is cheaper than a clutch/input shaft. Cheaper, unless it strands me on the road somewhere between there and here.

 

Steve, the bike with the input shaft issues can become real expensive & without lots of measuring & verifying or massive parts replacement it could re-occur at a later time.. Probably cheaper to buy a known good bike than one with a shaft/alignment problem..

 

 

Now on the ABS issue bike. That depends on the year & type of braking system.. If an early non power assist (non IABS) it might be something that can be repaired or removed..

 

On the later power assist IABS bikes the repair can be costly & more involved..

 

In any case an early non power assist unit should cause no problem riding in the failure mode.. The later power assist IABS system can be problem riding with the failed ABS controller problem as there is some diminished braking in failure mode..

 

On either system you do have the option of completely removing the ABS controller & converting to a conventional non ABS brake system (that is what I would personally do)

 

Twisty

 

 

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I'm sure it would be better if we knew what model bikes. A non-linked non-servo R1100 is very different from a link/servo R1150. ABS not working can be many things. A control unit is $$$$. OTOH on one of my Torrey trips with my R1100RT ABS stopped working. I put a piece of tape on the flashing light and rode it home to Maryland. All it needed was a relay, less than $100.

Clutch splines: If the bike has less than 50K miles it probably has a mis-aligned gearbox and I would stay away from it. '02 R1150 bikes are the most common to have that problem.

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Dances_With_Wiener_Dogs

The ABS bike is a 1997 R1100RT with 54K miles. The ABS dash lights have been disabled and no mention of the problem was discussed with my agent (ahem, BeneciaRT_GT :Cool:) however Richard noticed during a ride test that the ABS was in fact not working and he was able to lock up the rear wheel.

 

This bike was serviced in June at the Mtn View BMW dealership who performed the 48K service. Since it's Monday I have no way of knowing if the ABS worked at the time of service.

 

The spline bike is a 2001 R1100RT with 47K miles...from the ad, "47k miles. This was my daily commuter bike. Runs good, but needs a new input shaft in the transmission and a clutch. Properly repaired, this bike should go another 47K miles or more. Unfortunately, I'm tired of working on it, so I bought another motorcycle. It is currently rideable, splines haven't stripped completely. I don't believe the gearbox has suffered any serious damage, but you should inspect it closely when you have it open.

 

I'm the second owner, purchased 3 years ago with 13K miles from local owner. I can give you a complete history of work I have done as well as work required. If you don't know exactly what an input shaft is and what's involved in repairing it, this isn't a bike for you. "

 

I had a long conversation with this guy and will be getting lots of photos tonight, which I will post here. I guess part of the decision for me is buying a bike with potentially less damage (the ABS) but where it was not disclosed versus buying the RT with more expensive problems but where the info was intentionally not disclosed.

 

Photos of the 97 are here: Linky

 

Although I would prefer to buy a bike without any damage, my finances don't permit that, so it's a matter of buying something I can live with. I should add that I'm choosing to get a bike with a few problems, instead of coughing up the 6-7K now for the bike that I really want.

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Dances_With_Wiener_Dogs

I think that I've decided that the right bike is out there somewhere and that it's not either one of these two. I had been fairly urgent to buy another bike, after selling the KTM. The reality is that Valerie and I will be commuting together for a few months, which is the bulk of my riding in the wintertime. So any newer bike would sit for much of the winter. Given that, I should just wait and add to the bike money I have. I'm convinced that there will be an ample number of bikes from which I can choose, come March or April.

 

I just hate to wait...:grin:

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Unhofliche_Gesundheit

i 'agree' you should not buy a bike with any known problems - you dont get to ride it!

 

while your money piles up you can keep learning and for sure keep shopping keep you eyes open for 'changing circumstances' forcing sale (divorces, baby, moving, other good and bad things...).

my impression is that prices from individuals are better at this time of the year nov - dec. people need the space. once hit jan bikes are stored and most can/will just wait for spring

 

good luck.

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