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entry level dslr help


grizzly660fan

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grizzly660fan

hi, I am pretty illiterate about camera and photography and want to change and learn all about it so I am in the market for a dslr. I have done point and shoot for years and want to improve.

 

I went to several camera review sights, they get very technical and go over my head pretty quickly.

 

costco has two camera's that caught my eye, which do you think is better for a noob (meaning me) and once the noob learns will keep the noob satisfied?

 

option 1 = Canon Rebel SXI

 

option 2 = Nikon D60

 

Both have two lenses in the kit, one standard and the other is longer so must be a zoom lens. the specs for each lens are listed as the same for both brands of camera.

 

what do you folks think?

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Last time I was over at Costco in Murray they had the Nikon D90. That would be a great choice. The Rebel XSi (just make sure it's the XSi, EOS 450D) is also a great choice, but I hadn't seen it at

Costco yet.

 

The D60 is ok, but I would not get it for a number of reasons.

 

You might consider a non-dSLR that has manual controls as a bridge. It won't have the image quality of a dSLR, but it will get you used to some of the manual control issues before you have to start dealing with lenses, filters, lugging all that around, and RAW processing too.

 

Jan

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Either will be great, IMO. Take some time to handle each, go through the menus, that sort of thing. Look at the available lenses. Then get the one that feels best.

 

 

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grizzly660fan

yes, they have the d90 also but it is not really entry level and as such is priced higher. these two seem to compete a lot in the reviews so I was seeking advice here.

 

I want to learn so am not afraid and probably already have a point and shoot that would be considered the "bridge".

 

you offer good advice, I do thank you for the help and quick reply!

 

 

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John Ranalletta

I opted for the Canon XSI and have been pleased. Here's a thread about that subject and the Canon flash unit as well. I opted to purchase the body and the two lenses shown in the referenced post.

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You know, I just looked back at the DPReview for the D60 and in hindsight I think it may be a really good choice. The reasons I opted over it to the XSi now seem, after 9 months of dSLR experience to be of no consequence. Mainly it was the limitation on shooting high quality jpgs in combination with RAW. The first few months of dSLR use I did shoot combined as the jpg seemed safe and easy. But pretty soon you realize how powerful RAW is and how much storage space you are wasting on jpgs you never use. I gave it up and shoot only RAW now. However, if you think you would want to shoot both RAW and jpg this is not the camera for you. You need to realize that shooting RAW means you must process every shot. That's not for everyone, and I would argue makes the D60 less of an entry camera unless you just won't shoot RAW... and if you won't I wouldn't recommend a dSLR in any event.

 

As you go up in the dSLR range you are not going to find the cameras more intimidating or harder to use. Rather you will find better view finders and controls, faster shot to shot speed and shot buffer capacity, better image quality, and bigger bodies with better ergos. So don't be afraid to spend more in that respect. It won't be too much camera for you is what I am saying, though you may not want to go higher in the range anyway.

 

Next consider lenses. Are the kit lenses worth anything, or will you be buying replacements. You can find body only sales on line at very competitive prices. I use the Rebel XSi kit lens, though I am not feeling like it is world class. Some kit lenses are really not very usable. See HERE

 

I'd be happy to let you try out the Rebel XSi for a day or so if you like. I'm in Holladay. PM me if you want to.

 

Don't forget, whatever you buy you will need extra storage, lens filters, lens hoods, extra battery, etc.

 

Oh, and I would think anything 12 mp and over would last you a long, long time. The mp race is likely nearing the end of it's useful life, 12 mp being better than lens resolution for all but the best lens.

 

Jan

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I won't bore you with my opinion on which dSLR to buy. I'll just add this.

 

Whichever model you get, go to Barnes & Noble or Amazon, & get a good book on how to use all the features. The user manual that comes with it is junk. Kinda like the manual that came with bikes in the seventies, showing you where the seat is & such.

 

Magic Lantern is a good publishing company for this sort of thing, & David L. Busch also writes great instructional books.

 

Also, with due respect to Jan, I'd advise you to not get caught up in the details of jpeg vs. RAW just yet. That's for later. First things first, get the camera & learn how it works.

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I won't bore you with my opinion on which dSLR to buy. I'll just add this.

 

Whichever model you get, go to Barnes & Noble or Amazon, & get a good book on how to use all the features. The user manual that comes with it is junk. Kinda like the manual that came with bikes in the seventies, showing you where the seat is & such.

 

Magic Lantern is a good publishing company for this sort of thing, & David L. Busch also writes great instructional books.

 

Also, with due respect to Jan, I'd advise you to not get caught up in the details of jpeg vs. RAW just yet. That's for later. First things first, get the camera & learn how it works.

 

With due respect to Danny: But if you get a camera that doesn't give you the choice of shooting both simultaneously, then you are forced into those details immediately. That's my point.

 

Edit: Now Danny, get your..... ..... ..... "butt" over to Tommy's thread and have some fun in the "end" :clap:

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I won't bore you with my opinion on which dSLR to buy. I'll just add this.

 

Whichever model you get, go to Barnes & Noble or Amazon, & get a good book on how to use all the features. The user manual that comes with it is junk. Kinda like the manual that came with bikes in the seventies, showing you where the seat is & such.

 

Magic Lantern is a good publishing company for this sort of thing, & David L. Busch also writes great instructional books.

 

Also, with due respect to Jan, I'd advise you to not get caught up in the details of jpeg vs. RAW just yet. That's for later. First things first, get the camera & learn how it works.

 

With due respect to Danny: But if you get a camera that doesn't give you the choice of shooting both simultaneously, then you are forced into those details immediately. That's my point.

 

Edit: Now Danny, get your..... ..... ..... "butt" over to Tommy's thread and have some fun in the "end" :clap:

 

I didn't mean to imply for him to get a camera that can't shoot in both, just not to get distracted by it.

 

I don't know about the Nikon, but the Canon can shoot in either one or the other, or both.

 

And I already busted Tommy's butt, so to speak. :grin:

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The D60 will shoot both RAW and jpg simultaneously, but will only shoot low quality jpg when in that mode. The jpgs are of little use. It will shoot high quality jpg when not in dual mode.

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Before anyone shops online, they should visit www.Resellerratings.com and check out what others have to say about a particular dealer. 1Wayphoto gets a 1.01 out of 10.

 

My advice is to buy locally. You will then have a store that you can visit to obtain valuable information. If all you want is a cheap price, don't expect a local dealer to answer your questions on operation of your camera should you decide to visit them.

 

Yes I am in the business but have no affiliation with any of the companies mentioned in my post.

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Before anyone shops online, they should visit www.Resellerratings.com and check out what others have to say about a particular dealer. 1Wayphoto gets a 1.01 out of 10.

 

My advice is to buy locally. You will then have a store that you can visit to obtain valuable information. If all you want is a cheap price, don't expect a local dealer to answer your questions on operation of your camera should you decide to visit them.

 

Yes I am in the business but have no affiliation with any of the companies mentioned in my post.

 

Good point, especially for a pricy item like this. I had no idea about 1Wayphoto's ratings.

 

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Anytime the price is waaaaaay below everyone else, you should be VERY careful.

 

www.Resellerratings.com is a great resource for online shoppers. However I still say support your local dealer or next time you need help, he may not be there. You may pay a bit more but in the end it is generally worth it.

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DaveTheAffable
I won't bore you with my opinion on which dSLR to buy. I'll just add this.

 

Whichever model you get, go to Barnes & Noble or Amazon, & get a good book on how to use all the features. The user manual that comes with it is junk. Kinda like the manual that came with bikes in the seventies, showing you where the seat is & such.

 

Magic Lantern is a good publishing company for this sort of thing, & David L. Busch also writes great instructional books.

 

Also, with due respect to Jan, I'd advise you to not get caught up in the details of jpeg vs. RAW just yet. That's for later. First things first, get the camera & learn how it works.

 

+1 It amazes me that some people will spend hundreds, or thousands of dollars on a camera, and not $20 - $30 on books from experts that will GREATLY improve your photos.

 

How many people have we seen buy a high performance motorcycle, be disappointed when their riding doesn't immediately approve.

 

Either Canon or Nikon will take excellant photos technically, but it takes an owner with vision to make a "worthy" picture.

 

For years, "Parade" magazine had an "Instamatic" photo competition. Many of the pictures were stunning, made with cameras that had no controls at all.

 

It's true here too. Many of the pictures we see on BMWST are good because of vision, lighting, composition, and subject. Those things things don't come in the box with the camera. :/

 

The Nikon and Canon slrs are BOTH excellant. You won't get a "bad" camera whichever you choose...

...but trust your friends to say, "Awwww...you should have bought the Cyber Kitcha-Doodle model x33 kazoomee. That's too bad."

 

Just take whatever you buy, even if it were an Instamatic, and shoot the heck out of it and post pictures. :grin:

 

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+1 It amazes me that some people will spend hundreds, or thousands of dollars on a camera, and not $20 - $30 on books from experts that will GREATLY improve your photos.
Uh, books require reading. Where's the fun in that? :)

 

How many people have we seen buy a high performance motorcycle, be disappointed when their riding doesn't immediately approve.
Lots. Haven't you been reading sportbike sites? However, it DOES actually improve - at least in their minds. Getting from corner to corner in less time lowers their times. Hence, they're better. Same thing with cameras: The poorly composed image is sharper, so it much be a better picture.

 

Who needs this "how to" crap anyway if it's better than it used to be?

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DaveTheAffable
+1 It amazes me that some people will spend hundreds, or thousands of dollars on a camera, and not $20 - $30 on books from experts that will GREATLY improve your photos.
Uh, books require reading. Where's the fun in that? :)

 

How many people have we seen buy a high performance motorcycle, be disappointed when their riding doesn't immediately approve.
Lots. Haven't you been reading sportbike sites? However, it DOES actually improve - at least in their minds. Getting from corner to corner in less time lowers their times. Hence, they're better. Same thing with cameras: The poorly composed image is sharper, so it much be a better picture.

 

Who needs this "how to" crap anyway if it's better than it used to be?

 

Silly me... :dopeslap:

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grizzly660fan

Thank you one and all for the help and iput. I decided on the Nikon as I played with them the nikon fit better and I understood the menu's easier (not that the cannon had hard menu's). I will be doing some reading as matt said, boring, but I want to learn how this all works.

 

 

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I still say buy from a knowledgable local retailer, then you can go in and have a conversation about things. If something is said that you don't quite understand, they will explain it differently so that you do, I don't think a book can do that.

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Thank you one and all for the help and iput. I decided on the Nikon as I played with them the nikon fit better and I understood the menu's easier (not that the cannon had hard menu's). I will be doing some reading as matt said, boring, but I want to learn how this all works.

 

 

The D60? :) How are you liking now that you have it home?

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grizzly660fan

yes, the d60 is what I landed on. so far very pleased with it! I am mostly shooting in auto mode thus far, but am expanding my knowledge and will experiment learn more over time.

 

 

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