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Engine misses every couple seconds


SyntorX

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When I start my 1995 R1100RS and let it idle it misses very couple seconds continually.

 

The RPMs just drop really quick and then just as fast come right back up..as I ride it and warm it up to temperature the frequency of the "missing" goes up to once every 30-60 sec. Sometimes it goes away.

 

Another way to describe it is like one of the cylinders dosent get any fuel on a cycle of the piston.

 

Any ideas??

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Sounds like an air leak, an easy check. First, check your TB intakes for security/leaks. Then, with the motor idling, spray some WD40 all connections/joints in the system. If the rpm's increase...there's your leak :thumbsup:. Could be a bad O'ring.

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Sounds like an air leak, an easy check. First, check your TB intakes for security/leaks. Then, with the motor idling, spray some WD40 all connections/joints in the system. If the rpm's increase...there's your leak :thumbsup:. Could be a bad O'ring.

Just a FYI. I have been warned recently about the use of WD-40 for leak detection ( LINK ) I used a unlit Propane torch as suggested. It was much neater than past attempts with WD-40. My 02¢ :D:wave:

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To save mucking about with anything volatile, if I'm checking a motor for air leaks, I just use some water in a spray bottle, revs will drop not increase, thus identifying the leaky area.

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To save mucking about with anything volatile, if I'm checking a motor for air leaks, I just use some water in a spray bottle, revs will drop not increase, thus identifying the leaky area.

 

Using water is an option I suppose, but it really isn't comparable to using a gaseous medium. Water may end up tracking into the leak zone, then by capilliary action may get to where a potential leak is and block it for a while and actually make finding the true problem HARDER to find until the water has dried up again. At least with gas, it is sucked straight in, and you can use a regular leak checking proceedure to identify where the problem lies. BUT do be careful because the gas we are talking about is of course volatile and there is a risk of nasties.

 

Andy

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You could use the "Monty Python" method for finding intake leaks, way cheaper and probably more fun.

You know..."I fart in your general direction" :grin: :grin:

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You could use the "Monty Python" method for finding intake leaks, way cheaper and probably more fun.

You know..."I fart in your general direction" :grin: :grin:

 

According to my friends I'd have a better view that way, considering where my head is most of the time.....

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