Jump to content

Manual tire changers


Bryan1

Recommended Posts

I'm in the market for a tire changer and have been looking at the No-Mar. I was just wanting some opinions on which ones work the best. I have seen the Harbor Freight ones but I'm some what skeptical of how good they are. Any info will be greatly appreciated. The No-Mar is rather pricey but sometimes you get what you pay for.

Link to comment

Harbor freight here, not the best in the world but I don't make my living changing tires either. Take your time and be careful it will do anything you want to do and not cost an arm and a leg.

Link to comment
IndianaHarvey

My first manual tire changer was the Harbor Freight. I scratched the heck out of the first wheel I changed, a R1100 front. Mostly my fault because didn't realize the clips that hold the rim where on the changer backwards. I'd say it's ok for the easier tires to change. Then I bought a Coates 220 Model. Much better but much more expenisve. Then added the No-Mar mount demount bar and bead breaker and 4 of their tire spoons, plus the yellow thingy. If I had it all over to do again I'd go with the No-Mar top of the line model. Send me a PM if you'd like more details.

Harvey

Link to comment

I use the HF with the no mar blocks from Mitch along with his MoJo lever. I do not use the HF "motorcycle attachment" which is a stabilizing arm that hold the center bar as I have never needed it. I mount it to my lift (800 pounds) when I need it and store it out of the way when not in use. Works well for me.

Link to comment

Harbor freight for me too. It's not the best but it works and if your cafefull you won't scratch your wheels. It pays for it self very quickly.

Link to comment

Harbor freight changer for me as well.....along with Mitch's Mojo Lever. The only changes I've made have been that I also don't use the "motorcycle adapter" arm. I think it gets in my way more than anything else. I also coated the rim hooks and bead breaker with plasti-dip so it wouldn't mark up my rims. Works like a charm.

Link to comment
Keith, where can I get this plasti-dip you speak of?

 

I think I bought mine at Lowes, but just about any hardware store should have it. They used to sell it as a liquid that you had to dip the parts into, but now they have it in a spray can. It takes 4-5 coats to get a good protective covering, but it holds up really well. I'm about ready to put a fresh coat on my parts, but they held up for at LEAST 20+ tire changes........and that was without roughing up the surface before I painted them.

 

here is a LINK. If I remember correctly, it was in the isle with the spray paint, but all the way down by where they have things like garage floor epoxy and such

 

 

Link to comment

No Mar costs a lot more so one would expect it to be more robust and probably work better. But, my HF suffices very well for my tire changing needs on 3 bikes.

Link to comment
Check out Mitch's tire changer. I've helped him change a number of tires at Tech Days, and it works very well. I have his Mojolever, and use it with an HF tire changer. I would have bought his entire changer, but I bought the HF before he started making them so I just bought his bar.

Here is a link to his Mojolever.

http://home.comcast.net/~prestondrake/index.htm

 

No-Mar Tire Changer (This is their "Jr. Pro" model) would be a good first choice, especially if you mount a lot of tires & aren't concerned about cost.

 

Mitch's tire changer (not even sure he is making them anymore), coupled with his MojoLever works just fine once you get the hang of it.

 

"Gettingly the hang of it" is easier with the use of No-Mar's "YELLOW THING" & a good tire soap, such as Napa's RuGlyde (a gallon will last as long as the shelf life of a twinkie)

 

Link to comment

you can probably use a liquid whipping solution (to seal the ends of ropes) from a boat store, or maybe a brush on insulation in the wiring department of lowes/home depot

 

Link to comment

I purchased a No Mar at the Gillette Rally, they had a deal for free freight at the Rally. The No Mar is pretty expensive, but three of us went together and split the cost. We figure it will pay for itself in just a couple of changes, especially if you consider the savings of buying tires on line from someone like South West Moto as opposed to dealer prices on tires. I think that it is almost impossible to scratch a rim with the No Mar, although there is a little of a learning curve, but after the first change you get pretty good at it. There is also the convenience factor of changing tires when you want, as opposed to when the dealer "can get you in".

 

Steve

 

 

Link to comment

- HF Tire Change + MC Adapter

- Mojoblocks

- Ratchet Strap

- Mojobar

- RuGlide (RuLube?)

- Yellow Thingy (no mar)

- marc parnes tire balancer

 

From 'start to end' I can put new balanced skins on my bike in about 90 minutes and 2 beers.

 

If your struggling with the mount or dismount your doing it wrong.. it's all in the technique.

 

 

 

Link to comment

I have the No-Mar (the very first original version) and like it quite well. The newer versions are even better. Very pricey though.

Link to comment

FWIW,after changing tires with "Tarirons" for decades,using the No-Mar that I bought in 06,it is a pleasure. All the steps are done standing up,nice bead breaker,still a slight issue to get the wheel clamped,another person helps in that step,the only other tool I use is a large C-clamp to help hold the starting edge when mounting the new tire. Oh yea, and sometimes after breaking the bead,I use small pieces of 3/4" pine to hold the tire away from the wheel to make it easier to get the clamps to grab. At first I tried to use a half sheet of 3/4" plywood with concrete blocks for a base,nope,anchored to the floor is the only way to go if changing tires solo.

Did seven changes this year,now it's sort of fun,particularly when mounting new Avons or Bridgestones.

 

Steve

Link to comment
Steve have ya tried these ????

 

Yes, I ordered the package deal and the clamps and tire irons was part of the deal, the only thing I did not get was the "Yellow Thingy", I've been thinking that maybe I should order one, seems like it might make it easier.

 

Thanks for asking,

 

Steve

Link to comment
I recommend the 'yellow thingy'.

 

I used a small wooden block until this happened !.

I only use the small wood blocks between the tire and wheel to help set the clamps,then remove them. After beadbreaking the second side,I install about four blocks,flip over the wheel,clamp and go from there with the dismount.

The blocks seem to help with not needing to put so much downward pressure on the old tire/wheel to get the wheel down far enough for the clamps to get a bite.

 

Steve

Link to comment

For holding the tire bead down, I just use bar clamps. I've got the yellow thingy, but I didn't find it particularly handy (no pun intended) compared to the clamps.

 

If you're thinking about the HF changer, be aware that it goes on sale a few times a year and becomes even cheaper.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...