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Extensive Report on Windshields for R1200RT


GregB

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When I bought a R75/5 in 1973 I never gave wind management a thought. Upgrading to a R100RS convinced me that some protection from the wind was a good thing. 25 years later, I want perfection. Isn't progress great?

 

I want to make it clear that this report is only about the R1200RT. I have played around with different windshields on the R11xxRT enough to know that they are very different bikes. I'm 6'2" and 180 pounds so this report isn't going to mean much to someone whose head is in a much lower position when riding. The seat mounting position will affect the seat height. So will an aftermarket seat. Your height from your helmet to the bottom of your seat will affect the height of your helmet above that.

 

I went through a lot of work trying to find the perfect windshield for my R1200RT. I learned a lot along the way including the fact that the perfect windshield doesn't exist. Where I live, where I ride, and how I ride influence my choice of shield. The good points and bad points of each shield and the importance that I give to each of those points also influence that choice. Your riding situation and priorities may be very different so I will try to report the good points and bad points of each shield to help you make your choice. I hope that this saves some of you a great deal of effort and money. These are listed in the order that I tried them:

 

OE (Original Equipment):

 

The R1100RT had exceptionally good wind management for its day. The R1200RT continues some of the same good ideas such as smooth curves and substantial airflow under the shield to cut down turbulence. The decade-newer design of the R1200RT improves on that by making the windshield much taller so that the electric adjuster can move the shield further before the shield becomes too vertical to work well. It also adds winglets on the sides and an additional director plate under the front of the shield that moves with the shield. These two improvements keep the airflow smooth when the shield is fully lowered until the shield is moved about half way toward fully extended. The top is very curved laterally and is cut to be flat when in a low position. When moved up a bit it starts to be much higher on the sides and I felt like I was looking in the middle of a groove.

 

The protected area is fairly narrow but the transition from the protected area behind the shield to strong airflow on the sides is fairly "soft". Riders up to average height seem to be fairly happy with the OE shield. I assume that BMW was limited when designing the stock shield by appearance goals and the need to make sure that the shortest potential buyer could see over the shield. They don't offer a "tall" shield like they do for some other bikes, which seems curious to me. It seems odd to me that the person who is happy with the OE windshield is most likely to be happy with the low seat option.

 

Aeroflow

 

I rode a friend's R1200RT with the Aeroflow screen. He lives in Seattle, where it doesn't get hot and is frequently cold and wet. He likes the protection in that environment but when he rode it to Southern California he was frying behind the shield and it was closer to fall than summer! I tried it out and agree completely. This is when I realized that we wouldn't all think the same windshield is excellent. This test ride started me on my windshield quest but I didn't really test it thoroughly or make notes so I am not going to comment much. I assume that this is a good windshield for someone that wants something completely different than I. Their interest is probably trying to stay warm and rarely trying to stay cool.

 

Cee Bailey's +1+1:

 

The "design innovation" of the CB is the flip at the top. This is designed to flip the air up and over you making the windshield work like it is taller than the actual size. It is curved laterally in the body like the stock shield but much less in the top "flip" area so it avoids the strange "groove" feeling of the stocker as it is adjusted higher.

 

CB offers this in a light tint in gray or green. I ordered the light gray and I am not sure I would repeat that choice. It looks really great but at night it reflects lots of instrument light on the inside of the shield.

 

The flip actually works and directs substantial air over you. CB claims that a 2" shorter unit protects as well as the stock windshield and I believe that. I was quite comfortable with this shield and it protected me with the windshield below my line-of-sight. My personal preference is to never look through a windshield. I'm assuming that someone that wants to look through a windshield is buying a different motorcycle than an RT but there are certainly exceptions. Looking through the flip area of the CB is weird with the distortions.

 

Since there is a huge amount of air going over you the CB takes any rain over you too, protecting you very well. I was amazed to find that I stayed completely dry during a 30-minute rainstorm on a freeway at 70mph.

 

The shape and material means that the CB is as rigid as OE but you can actually see the additional force that the wind makes on the shield. There are reports of support arms breaking and I can see how that would be possible. I would be really concerned going larger than the +1+1 that I ordered but I wouldn't want one bigger than that anyway.

 

The flip creates substantial turbulence and is the opposite of a shape that would be designed to create smooth airflow. That turbulence means noise and you will want to be sure that the shield is adjusted so that the dirty air is above you. This makes it touchy to get the correct size but CB makes them in steps of 1" so you can order the correct size if you can figure out what that is. There is also a smaller flip on the sides making that air turbulent also. It directs this out far enough that I don't feel it but it is just outside my body width so I wonder if a wider person might feel this.

 

If you lower the shield to get cooling airflow, you end up with very turbulent air on your head. The part of you that is in the dirty air will get cool and thrashed by the turbulence but the part of you that is protected will not. This is quite different than my R1100S where your torso is fairly well protected but your head is in direct, but smooth, airflow. You can adjust the CB down and cool off if the speed is below 45mph or so but you won't want to try to stay cool on a highway for very long. You can't get much cooling air on your body, only your shoulders and head. Under certain conditions, mostly at higher speeds, the turbulence seems to come around and hit your back. I don't carry a passenger but I can assume that this could be an issue for a passenger.

 

Since you want this shield adjusted to keep the turbulent air over you and since it offers good rain protection, this seems like a good shield for someone who deals with rain a lot and is more worried about staying warm than staying cool. It isn't very good at covering a wide range of riding conditions but I considered it a big improvement over OE for a person my size.

 

Fit/finish, materials, quality of construction, and customer service on my order was outstanding. I want to mention that it is really attractive and the appearance suits the bike very nicely in my opinion.

 

Z-Technik Vstream:

 

This is made from Polycarbonate instead of the DOT approved impact resistant acrylic of the other windshields. Like everything else, this is partly good, partly bad. It is very rigid, and more resistant to impacts than DOT approved acrylic. Polycarbonate requires a completely different manufacturing process, which means that it would be very expensive to offer different sizes. They offer it in one size, which happens to be about right for me. Polycarbonate also requires a coating since it is not resistant to chemicals that a motorcycle windshield would encounter under normal use. The coating means that it is harder to scratch when cleaning with normal care. It also means that once the coating gets scratched, the shield will deteriorate much more quickly. The scratch cannot be polished out. This is all theory and I have no experience with deterioration in actual use since I used this shield for only a thousand miles or so.

 

The "design innovation" of the Vstream is a compound shape that creates vortices off the top corners of the shield in order to get the turbulent air out and away from the rider's head. Similar to the CB, it is creating more turbulence in order to keep the rider out of turbulence. Like the CB, this makes the Vstream sensitive to sizing and adjustment. The worst of the turbulence is beside and above your head so you don't hear the noise as much and the air right down the center is smoother than the CB. This means you can adjust the shield down a bit to get some cooling air on your helmet and not get battered about as much as the CB.

 

The Vstream claims to be 26.5" tall, which is 1" taller than the CB +1+1. The Vstream has a similar curve to OE and the CB has its upward flip. This means that the effective height for the rider is about the same when they are adjusted for a similar amount of protection. The big difference is that the Vstream is very wide at the top. This gives it a "Gold Wing" type of appearance, more "touring" than sport/touring in my opinion. The huge problem is that the width at the top is in your line-of-sight on some corners. A few downhill turns judged through the distortion at the corners due to the vortex inducing shape and I was not happy. This doesn't suit my use for an RT but your needs may be different.

 

If you lower the shield so that you can see the corners, you run into another problem. When the Vstream is lowered, the air blast on the rider is more than on a naked bike. It is like a big wedge shoving the blast in your face. I had to try this several times going down the same street at the same speed on the RT and a naked bike to believe it was actually worse. If you park your bike and naturally run the shield down, you will be adjusting it up very quickly when you ride off! I was moving it up by 25mph instead of 35-40 with the CB.

 

I noticed some weird behavior when following big trucks on the freeway with the Vstream but didn't really fixate on it that much until I started hearing the same thing from others. I don't spend much time doing that so I don't consider that a big negative.

 

I really hated the Vstream but I can see how someone that doesn't like (or have) twisties and is more interested in staying warm than staying cool might like it a lot.

 

California Scientific:

 

I had been fairly happy with their shield for the R1100RT. Based upon that, I must say that CalSci "gets it". They did not make one for the R1200RT. I responded when they made a request for help developing a shield for the R1200RT. This means that they are providing their expertise on theory with my opinions on function. I didn't know what I was getting myself into. In all seriousness, I have now mounted a windshield on my R1200RT one hundred times! I found that I had to work hard to make objective opinions about any changes and not make assumptions. Obviously, I like it. This makes sense when you consider that it wasn't put into production until I couldn't find anything left that we could improve. It still has good points and bad points and you will have to decide if it fits your priorities.

 

The "design innovation" of the CalSci is the smooth airflow with a shield designed with the idea of keeping the airflow smooth.

 

When I received the first prototype, I was a bit shocked since the test features made it ugly. I was totally shocked at the improvement in function. I had to switch back and forth a few times to really believe the improvement. By the third prototype, we finally got even better function along with good appearance. The final version got even better, particularly in working well through a range of riding conditions.

 

The appearance is more "touring" than OE but less than the Vstream. It is about the same size as the CB +1+1 but mounts a bit more vertical. It is narrower at the top so it doesn't get in your line-of-sight like the Vstream.

 

The best feature is the protection from the windblast along with a gentle breeze that seems to move enough air around you to let your venting work. There is smooth airflow in the lowest position and the highest. It is fairly flexible and you don't have to work hard to find just the right adjustment. Like a really good modern convertible, there is airflow without the blast and noise. I can actually ride off with the shield in the lowest position and not feel a need to move it up until I hit a highway. On a calm day and without other traffic around you, it is comfortable with the visor up well past highway speeds when adjusted properly. Lack of wind noise is incredible. I now ride without earplugs unless I will be on a freeway where there is noise from other vehicles and the gusty wind from trucks.

 

On a really hot day, the airflow seems about right for comfort at highway speeds. It would be nice to have a bit more airflow at low speeds. However, on a really cold day, it would be nice to have a bit more protection. This can be accomplished by running a strip of 2" plastic tape vertically thru the main vent. I had to point this out for people to notice it. It will probably surprise most people to learn that taping off the vent completely gives you less protection.

 

I am riding with the tall model and I usually keep the seat in the upper position.

 

Conclusion:

 

They are all good, just completely different!

 

If anyone is in the area and wants to borrow any of the three to test, just let me know.

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Wow! A lot of info to ruminate on... My thinking has been (and on my farkles "to order" list) a VStream shield. Why? Because I like the looks (web photos) best and because of prior satisfaction with National Cycle products including a VStream currently mounted on my FJR. The FJR VStream appears to be even wider than the National/ZTechnik version, yet I haven't had problems with cornering visibility as you described with the unit you tested (see attached photo).

 

Is the CalSci web photo of your bike? Perhaps the old addage of "form follows function" applies to the final production design, but the shape of the shield at bottom plus the airflow port do seem unusual to my eyes. CalSci R1200RT windscreen

 

I'm prox 5'11'+ and sit on standard saddle in the lower position. My objective is a little more protection / less wind noise to increase enjoyment of radio / CD unit. I think I need to read your review again, reflect on your personal objectives and make a decision of my own. Thank you Greg for sharing all this with us!

 

Jeff

912665-FJRcontrolsandwindscreen.JPG.b34b03fd3760bf78c74883d39c3006d0.JPG

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Which model of the Cal Sci shield did you end up with? Their web site shows three not two heights.

 

Thanks,

 

Dan Forker

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Is the CalSci web photo of your bike? Perhaps the old addage of "form follows function" applies to the final production design, but the shape of the shield at bottom plus the airflow port do seem unusual to my eyes. CalSci R1200RT windscreen

Jeff

Yes, that is my bike in their photo and I do agree that the look is a bit unusual. It does look better in person than in that photo. Interesting to note that I get zero comments on appearance, positive or negative. People don't notice anything different. There were 14 R bikes when I went on the Glendora ridge ride and zero comments. There were 75 people at the Willow Springs event and zero comments.

 

I think the CB looks the best. The VStream looks good, just way more "touring" than "sport" for my taste.

 

The CalSci is 17" wide just below the upper corners - about 4" below the top. The VStream is 25" wide just below the upper corners, which is about 2" below the top.

 

You are fairly close. If you get by this way, you are welcome to try them out.

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Which model of the Cal Sci shield did you end up with? Their web site shows three not two heights.

Thanks,Dan Forker

That must be a recent change. I'm waaaaay behind. I assume the one I have is now called X-Large, it is 23.5" tall. I would confirm before ordering.

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Thanks Greg for the report, I would like to take you up on your offer sometime.I live in west Riverside. I Have the C/B and am not that happy with it. It's better than stock, but leaves a lot of room for improvement.

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assume that BMW was limited when designing the stock shield by appearance goals and the need to make sure that the shortest potential buyer could see over the shield.

 

If that was a goal, it didn't work. My wife (Bullett, 5'2", low seat in low position) got the Cee Baily Sumdome because she couldn't see over the stock shield. The stock shield is not "optically correct" which makes looking though it dangerous. The Cee Baily offers her great protection (it is adequate even for me, 5'9" standard seat in low position). The Sumdome is much thicker than the stock windshield. Although smaller, it does a great job of managing wind flow.

 

Thanks for your interesting and informative report!

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CruisinCruzan

My windshield quest has been to improve comfort for my wife who rides with me about 60% of the time. With the stock screen she felt that she was getting pounded by turbulence, especially her arms/shoulders to the point she felt "beat up" after the ride. This was in comparison to the way she felt after riding on my R1200C Montana with the stock screen. My guess is that screen let more of the turbulence hit me which made things more comfy for my wife. Bought the CB +1 height, +6 width (I'm 5'9" wife is 5'7") she said it was an improvement over stock but still worse than the C. Then bought the V-Stream, which has remained on the bike, which is even closer to the way the C felt. At this point I have stopped purchasing screens as we have no problem going long distances. As for me I found that I had no difficulty being comfortable behind any of the screens. I could vary the flow with minor height adjustments. I never had to ride looking through the shield. I was surprised how little improvement my wife experienced from the CB, especially since it was +6 width. I then compared it off the bike to the stock screen and it didn't seem much wider (my thought was I needed the additional width to move the air out further so that it would hopefully collapse back once it was past my wife).

It turns out the way they measure the width coupled with the shape/curve of the shield it doesn't stick out 3" more on each side which is what I was hoping for. Bottom line is that I think they all (including stock) did a good job protecting the rider and had much less success protecting the passenger.

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I tried them all and found the Aeroflow to be the best for my needs. Best of all worlds would be to replace Aeroflow with a small w/s for hot weather riding and get more airflow.

Bruce

 

"If you don't know where you are going, you will wind up somewhere else"

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I'm 6'1", 175 lb with a 33" inseam. I run an regular OEM seat in the low position sans bar risers. 30% with a pillion who is 5'5".

 

We have tried aeroflow, CB +2H / +4W, ZTek, and OEM. The aeroflow was certainly the best at converting the bike to a car. The CB and ZTeck were L-O-U-D and adjusting them was touchy - like 1st gear on an R1. After all the B.S., we are back to the OEM and able to do 400 m/day with ear plugs. Sore butts a given with the OEM seats.

 

Over the course of all this I came to realize that a bike is a bike and the reason I enjoy riding has a lot to do with the sensations I get from my body moving through the air. These big screens start to take away that aspect of pleasure for me and my wife. I don't want to be disconnected from the fact that I am on a bike. Overall, IMHO, the OEM looks great, has some turbulence, but creates a good enough pocket to let us communicate and not get too beat up from buffeting over the long haul.

 

I really appreciate this report. Everyone is looking for something different in their riding experience and this type of experiential data is really useful. If we ever tried a different screen again for noise reduction, it would be the Cal-Sci based on your comments. Thanks again! thumbsup.gif

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Great report and I'm really glad to have the information. Like many others on this board I've tried them all. Stock shield, Aeroflow, CB, Ztech and had resolved that I would have to settle for the CB as the best alternative even though I don't like it's looks compared to the Ztech(which was noisy) Now this comes along and I'm curious as to whether there are any others out there that have actual experience with this CalSci windshield? If there are I'd really be interested in hearing from them and knowing which of the three sizes they have.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Dan Forker

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I reported that I prefer the Aeroflow but on hot days, it's too good. I just ordered the Medium Cal Sci and I'll let you know my thoughts in the very hot, humid weather of North Carolina. The owner has suggested I test it and then mark where I might want to have it cut down and send it back. He will cut it and ship it at no charge. Hopefully, I'll discover the right hot weather w/s without all the noise and turbulence the stock w/s gave me.

Bruce

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I thinking about ordering the large (+2) Cal Sci shield. I've discovered that I prefer riding in the high position for more legroom, better control in the twisties and a more commanding view of the road... but the stock screen is now 1-2" too low for freeway use. I'm about 6' tall.

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Greg,

Is there a reason for the windscreen being cut flat across the bottom as opposed to the 'v' cut on BMW's screen?

For a precise answer, you would have to talk to Mark at CalSci since he designed it. The first and second prototypes had a concave section along the bottom. Later, we were able to get the performance of that design with the improved appearance with a flat bottom. I would have liked to see a Vee shaped bottom more like stock but must admit that the flat botoom is not a big deal to me now. The picture on the CalSci.com website does make the flat bottom stand out and it really doesn't stand out in-person. Guess I better take a few more pictures.

 

There is a Vee shaped wing section under the shield as part of the bracket that holds the windshield. It therefore moves with the windshield and it is supposed to help the air follow the back of the windshield. It did that on the other windshields but only when move up a bit but not too far. With the current design, you can see the air following the back of the shield through a much wider adjustment range. I can assure you that riding around with a bunch of pieces of yarn taped to your windshield looks really weird compared to the bottom of the Vee missing!

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I placed my order last night for the "Large" windscreen. I'm looking forward to it. My decision was made easier when my wife leaned forward while riding and said "You get a lot less wind than me. I decided the pocket wasn't large enough on the stock windscreen and in order to stretch out the riding season, I need to be able to keep the wind off teh passenger without having a huge shield that's unuseable in the summer, and might break the support arms.

 

One other question... does the Cal Sci screen vibrate and shake less than the OEM or other screens. I know most of the vibration is mechanical from bumps in the road, but some of it is aerodynamic.

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Great Post!

 

I can add that I've had my CeeBaileys windscreen for 2 seasons. Mine is larger than the one you tested. It just means that I don't raise it as high. I think it's very quiet because of that.

 

I broke two of the upper windscreen supports within a 2 month period after about a season of riding with it. One left and one right.

 

A while ago, I thought maybe I might make some stronger windscreen supports. SOMEONE ELSE DID IT AND SOLD A BATCH OF THEM. WHO WAS THAT? ANYONE KNOW HOW I CAN GET IN TOUCH??? I STILL WANT A SET OF THESE.

 

Thanks,

 

-TB

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One other question... does the Cal Sci screen vibrate and shake less than the OEM or other screens. I know most of the vibration is mechanical from bumps in the road, but some of it is aerodynamic.

I didn't notice much difference. The OE is pretty rigid but bounces around on the mechanism. Even though bigger, the CB is just as rigid due to the reverse curve on the sides and the bigger reverse curve (the flip) on the top. The wind visibly shoves the flip around at speed, which I assume is what breaks arms. The VStream is fairly rigid but has alot of surface area for the wind to push on. You can actually feel the vortex that they create ON PURPOSE vibrating the air off the top corners of the shield. Just hold your hand up just above and outside your shoulder. The CalSci is less rigid due to being one big smooth curve. The airflow is much smoother so it doesn't move around any more than the others.

If you are talking about the one that feels the most rigid when you are cleaning it and shoving it around with your hands, that would be the Cee Bailey's.

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I appreciated your thorough report. The OEM shield on my 12RT has been OK until the hot weather came. I went out today in Southern California, where it was over 100 degrees almost everywhere I went. I had my evaporative vest soaked to the max, and there was no adjustment on the windshield that got enough wind onto my torso to make the vest effective. It works great on my naked R69S, but not on the new bike. How about the California Scientific? You said that it produces enough breeze to make the vents work, and I'm not sure what you meant by that. Is there enough wind below the shoulders to make the wet vest work? (I am 5"10" with 31" inseam and ride with the low seat in the low position.)

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I haven't had the OE on for a month or two so I'm not going to comment on that without trying it again. Both the CB and VStream have a pretty sharp vertical cutoff for airflow. Above the cutoff and you are in the flow, below it and you are not. The CB is turbulent above and the VStream is not. When lowered the VStream is giving you airflow faster than you would have on a naked bike. Both of these are letting you blast air onto your helmet (and maybe a couple inches below my chin with my height). Below that and the air is very still. Not bad in cool temps but not very good when hot.

The CalSci has a light airflow that moves around most of your body. Best example I can think of is that it is more like a good convertible, airflow and a feeling of "being out in the air" but no blast.

It wouldn't do you any good to try my CalSci current shield or the previous prototype, they will be too tall for you.

When I drove home from work this afternoon, my truck showed 111 and it is very cloudy. Hope it rains so it will cool it off to 100 or so.......Too hot to CHOOSE a bike to ride to work since my house AC is broken

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After reading Greg's excellent test report and searching numerous related threads, I ordered and received my VStream today and installed it this evening. As indicated in my prior response near the top of this thread, I have been pleased with the VStream shield on my FJR and decided to go that route. That, plus $179 less 15% discount from dealer (not my local) that I bought the RT from brought the net cost low enough to risk a "test". No time for a ride tonight, but I will say that I like the look! It's similar in profile to the shield I've been using on my FJR for more than one year, but sleeker in the full down position. I do see what Greg means by distortion in the shield vortex (compound curve) areas, but I suspect it won't be an issue for me. Riding in twisties requires line of sight well beyond that area of distortion. Maybe I'll change my mind, but so far so good!

 

Jeff

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After letting a new friend try different shields and swapping back and forth last night, I realize one of my statements about the VStream needs some clarification. That distortion is only bothersome under a fairly rare situation. If you are riding up a hill and the road levels off and turns fairly sharply, you end up looking through the distorted area. If you are riding fairly fast, it is pretty weird. A trip up to the top of Mt. Baldy and back gives me several of those turns but I am sure that road is steeper and tighter than most mountain roads.

I do agree that the VStream is a very sleek shield and looks like it really goes with the R1200RT, but mostly when it is full down. When you compare the VStream for the R1200RT to your picture in the second post of the VStream for the FJR, it is much wider at the top. R1200RT is "V" shaped, FJR is "hourglass" shaped. I'm guessing that the FJR shield puts alot more air on your body. Is that correct?

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On the FJR, my favorite screen for warmer weather is actually a Givi. The objective with the VStream was to eliminate need for earplugs. While it is quieter that way than OE or the Givi, I still wore earplugs and eventually had a set molded for me. I did not find the VStream too large, but several others who tried it on an FJR did. It is a big shield, but I still look over it when fully raised (seldom up that far). At full up, there is some mild backpressure felt on my back. With the OE RT shield, I have not been wearing earplugs and don't plan to with the new VStream. The objective is a quieter pocket that allows more "tunes" and less windblast at highway speed. I can visualize the situation you describe in tight ascending/descending turns. Hopefully it will not be a major issue for me.

 

Jeff

 

After letting a new friend try different shields and swapping back and forth last night, I realize one of my statements about the VStream needs some clarification. That distortion is only bothersome under a fairly rare situation. If you are riding up a hill and the road levels off and turns fairly sharply, you end up looking through the distorted area. If you are riding fairly fast, it is pretty weird. A trip up to the top of Mt. Baldy and back gives me several of those turns but I am sure that road is steeper and tighter than most mountain roads.

I do agree that the VStream is a very sleek shield and looks like it really goes with the R1200RT, but mostly when it is full down. When you compare the VStream for the R1200RT to your picture in the second post of the VStream for the FJR, it is much wider at the top. R1200RT is "V" shaped, FJR is "hourglass" shaped. I'm guessing that the FJR shield puts alot more air on your body. Is that correct?

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Got my Calsci windscreen today. I had some issues with DHL delivery service, but customer service at Calsci is great. I ordered the Large 2+ height. I'm 5'11" and have the stock seat in the High positon.

 

Pros - Reasonable priced. It does what it claims. Absolutely NO turbulance at any position. Just clean air. The air is now pushed out just past my shoulders. the screen is clear enough to look through and in the highest position, I'm looking through it. However, it manages air so well, I don't need the last 2-3" of height adjustment. I still get some cool air at low speeds in the lowest position. The rounded corners help when cornering. It does seem to vibrate just a little bit less. Due to the aerdynamic design, I'm not worred about over stressing the arms, even though it's 2" wider, 2" taller and straight not concave like the OEM.

 

Cons - It's laser cut and the edges aren't finished. I talked to Mark about this and he said they considered it but it's a small shop now and they don't have manpower for it. It doesn't affect performance, but doesn't look as finished as OEM. It's also not tinted. I think that's a nice feature of the OEM shield which has a very light tint. For my height, I probably need it 1/2"- 1" shorter for more cool air at low speeds.

 

I'm going to ride it the rest of the season and decide if i want to send it back to get trimmed a little.

 

Overall opinon - so far, it's the best $200 I've ever spent. I expected an improvement over the already good OEM shield... but wow, these guys are onto something. It may not be conventional, but it works, and it doesn't look all that unusual. It actually blends in fairly well with the bikes lines. To sum it up... "Oh... so this is what it's like to ride behind the shield on an Goldwing... Cool!"

 

Mark suggested that if I wanted it more finished, I could take a razor blade or other sharp edge and scrape the laser cut marks off the edge of the shield. Hey... I remember doing that from 8th grade shop class. That's easy. I might do that then wet sand it with maybe 400, 600 then 800 grit sand paper and stop there. I want it a little dull so there isn't any wierd refracting of light at night. Maybe keep the top edge at 400.

 

I'd be amazed if a screen could be better than this. Since it has the hole putting more air behind the sheild thereby decreasing the vacuum behind the shield, I'm not at all concerned about and increased load on the arms.

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I found that I prefer the CalSci being "just in your line-of-sight" when it is run to the full up position. You don't normally have any reason to run it that high and it is normally way below your line-of-sight. The R1200RT windshield goes very vertical in its highest adjustment. This position seems only useful with the VStream since it is angled much lower than the others.

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