Jump to content

Unlicensed Riders and the irresponsible....


nicewife

Recommended Posts

Last weekend we went on a ride to Ojai (yuppie-hippie mountain town in Ventura Co.)for lunch with a friend of mine from work. She brought a couple of buddies, one of whom we later found out is not licensed and who proved herself to be a bona-fide hazard. She nearly rear ended me, never got over 60mph on the freeway (scared of the wind...) and really lacked skill. This was a reminder of why we don't ride in groups! Bill had to pick up her bike for her after she dumped it in the dust twice-target steering. I don't know about you folks, and I don't like to stereotype, but the HD "Born to Ride" renegade image sometimes attracts some scary people. I much prefer to dress and ride like the nice girl that I am-responsible, careful, and open to improving my skills as a rider. The end of the day was the kicker-a bunch of cops drinking at the end of a "memorial ride" for an officer who was killed in the line of duty. Whatever! Thanks for letting me share! dopeslap.gif

Link to comment

I know those kinds of days, which is why I don't like to ride with other people, or only a very select few. Too many differences in riding style (some slower, some faster, some like to doddle (me), others just have to get there ASAP, etc) really detracts from my enjoyment of the ride, plus having to keep an eye out for everyone else instead of keeping my mind on traffic and where I want to go. Plus, people like you described are just a liability if things get in a pinch..

Link to comment

Y'know, quite often I've seen cops behaving like that and for the life of me can't figure out why they'd have a problem with us seeing that as hypocritical. NOT the motojocks; the ones I've met seem more safety-minded like us, but rather the rank and file "Blue Knight"-type. My inlaws live across the street from a county sheriff that got 'Hog' about a year ago. I've seen off-duty cops climb on a bike that had no business driving, much less riding.

Link to comment

Don't like big groups...Four is about enough unless all have similar riding styles and skills....Having to keep an eye on others that you aren't comfortable riding near and the yo-yo effect that happens in big groups, and other distractions ruins the ride for me...Nope....I'll leave parade riding to those (insert bike of your choice) riders that like that stuff... smirk.gif

 

Phil.......Redbrick

Link to comment

Around here the cops have a definate "do as I say, not as I do" attitude. It's really pretty infuriating.

 

As for the drinking and riding, it seems to be part of the HD mentality. (don't bash me, I'm just speaking on the way things are in my neck of the woods.) My cousin rides a HD and belongs to a law enforcement club. All they seem to do is ride from bar to bar with the occasional weekend run to some other clubhouse to do...what else...drink. I don't get it but I'm no longer going to preach to him about it. The choice is his/theirs. I just hope they don't kill someone else in their travels.

Link to comment
...All they seem to do is ride from bar to bar with the occasional weekend run to some other clubhouse to do...what else...drink...

 

sounds a lot like what I see when go snowmobiling in wisconsin. I hardly ever drink and I don't preach, but a motor vehicle is a motor vehicle....

 

I guess I'm not the only one who likes to ride alone. It's bad enough we can't trust the cars, never mind the other bikers... frown.gif

Link to comment

I definetly like to know the folks I'm riding with! I have noticed a definite different in the styles of riding based on the bike you own.

Crotch Rocket- why do they even have two wheels?

Harley- Lets get drunk and look at chrome. Then we can see who's is louder.

BMW- Lets get the hell away from these jacklegs and ride!

lmao.gif

 

Let's see, I've probably offended several folks...sorry bout your luck! lmao.gif Just kidding. I'm just making a little observation with a twist of humor is all. I know not every rider is the same no matter what they ride.

Link to comment

As long as we're talking about little observations, lemme throw this one out for y"all...

 

Got up early last Sat morn... rode to Yosemite, went to Glacier Point. Then rode down to the valley floor. Stopped at the zoo they call a general store. I pull up into a group of HD riders. They all look at my RT in wide wonder, as if I was from another planet. A couple whom I parked next to are riding a ElectraGlide , brand new, paper plates still! The guy looks like Sam Elliott and she kinda like Bo Derek when she was young. Both of them with chaps on, she with a leather halter top, not much else behind it..The chick asks me if this is my first bike ( I wonder where that question comes from)...just as I decide enough chit chat, a wrecker pulls in the parking lot with a junked HD on the hook, like someone went down hard...The dude remarks" he musta done someting stupid.."

 

WTF???? dopeslap.gif

 

MB>

Link to comment

I love riding with other bmw's!

 

Reasons are

Same bikes with same powerband and handling characteristics.

That makes for nice tight groups when riding together.

 

Along the same vain is the riders of said bikes. Usually long haulers with lots of miles under their belts.

 

They're funny guys and gals too!

This cant be beat for enjoyment.

 

I'm a lone wolf all other times but put me with a group of beemers and i'm IN

Link to comment

Boy does this bring back memories coming home from Torrey last month. We were almost to Boulder and got behind at least 25-30 Harley's. Passed them with no problem the first time. Got behind them again due to a pull off looking for breakfast. Passed about half the group and got behind a female rider who was not very qualified. She was weaving which was really making me very nervous. Got around them again. Got behind them one more time when we actually stopped for breakfast. Would you believe out of the 75-90 bikes I actually passed those 3 times ONLY 2 RIDERS pulled into the right side of the lane to let us pass. I was not a happy camper with their etiquette or their skill level. I realize everyone has to learn but you don't do it on a curvy mountain road to start. Thanks for letting me get that off my chest. My buddy felt the same way as he had to pass them all 3 times as well.

Link to comment
MrHondamatic

I went for a ride a few weeks ago and came up behind what appeared to be a first time rider. Brand new Harley with paper plate, new half helmet, and struggling to go around a bend in the highway at 5 mph under the posted limit. It was scary as hell watching him try to force the bike around the corner by steering instead of leaning. Eventualy he turned off onto a county road, which made me feel a little better. Too much bike for a novice, I hope he survives.

Link to comment

There's a coffeshop down the street where at any given time of day, five to ten motorcycles are parked out front out of a group of around 25 regulars. It's a heterogenous group with lots of HDs, several BMWs, a few Ducatistis, and a smattering of Japanese bikes thrown in for good measure. Now I'm on summer vacation (I'm a teacher grin.gif), I stop by two or three times each week.

 

So yesterday a guy rolls up for the first time on a beautiful light green 2004 K1200GT. He's wearing an HD tee-shirt, shorts, and one of those little bowl helmets. It turns out he is one of the cruiser-riding regulars who had totalled his Victory Kingpin on some group ride a month ago. I never go on group rides with these guys for all the reasons cited here. Anyways, it's his first BMW and he had lots of questions for me

 

I bring it up here because with all the stereotypes being thrown around here (take this in a humorous way), what is going to happen to this guy? Will he transform into a 'Stich wearing, Autocom-having, hi-viz safety freak, or will the bike start sporting tassles and chrome? I'm so confused. confused.gif

Link to comment

I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes.

 

Next time you're "out for a ride" & come upon an unskilled rider, instead of getting irritated or nervous, why not wave them over & offer some suggestions. They might blow you off, but I'd bet they'd appreciate it. You don't have to spend a lot of time to make a big difference.

 

I've never done this, as it only occurred to me as I was reading this thread. But given the opportunity, I will.

 

The life you save may be theirs.

Link to comment
I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes.

 

Next time you're "out for a ride" & come upon an unskilled rider, instead of getting irritated or nervous, why not wave them over & offer some suggestions. They might blow you off, but I'd bet they'd appreciate it. You don't have to spend a lot of time to make a big difference.

 

I've never done this, as it only occurred to me as I was reading this thread. But given the opportunity, I will.

 

The life you save may be theirs.

 

thumbsup.gif Well done! I hope that someday I too can see through the cynicism and sarcasm of the world! It could be an interested spin off of a tech daze. Getting together in small groups and going over technique and maybe even setting up a course in an empty parking lot.

Link to comment
MrHondamatic
I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes.

 

Next time you're "out for a ride" & come upon an unskilled rider, instead of getting irritated or nervous, why not wave them over & offer some suggestions. They might blow you off, but I'd bet they'd appreciate it. You don't have to spend a lot of time to make a big difference.

 

I've never done this, as it only occurred to me as I was reading this thread. But given the opportunity, I will.

 

The life you save may be theirs.

 

I had thought about this after the fact and will give it a try the next time I encounter such a situation. Although (stereotypes be damned) a H-D rider taking pointers from someone on anything other than H-D, may or may not be welcome. I guess I'll have to find out.

 

At least I can outrun him if it doesn't go well. wink.gif

Link to comment

I live in the land of vehicle over crowding and road rage. Add on top of that that 90% of drivers or riders use their transportation as status symbols or suggested social standing.... yeah I think I will just ride on.

 

I like the idea but around here maybe not so much.

Link to comment
skinny_tom (aka boney)
I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes.

 

Next time you're "out for a ride" & come upon an unskilled rider, instead of getting irritated or nervous, why not wave them over & offer some suggestions. They might blow you off, but I'd bet they'd appreciate it. You don't have to spend a lot of time to make a big difference.

 

I've never done this, as it only occurred to me as I was reading this thread. But given the opportunity, I will.

 

The life you save may be theirs.

 

I'm game.

Link to comment
I live in the land of vehicle over crowding and road rage. Add on top of that that 90% of drivers or riders use their transportation as status symbols or suggested social standing.... yeah I think I will just ride on.

 

I like the idea but around here maybe not so much.

 

Don't forget the nation's "Unlicensed/Uninsured Capitol."

 

I'm not sure I'd be happy about a stranger approaching me and critiquing my riding technique. A friend... now that's a different story.

Link to comment
milesandmiles

Several points;

Unsolicited advise is seldom accepted

I wouldn't want to critique a stranger anyway

Riding in an unfamiliar group spells trouble

Teachers are way underpaid

An idiot is an idiot, no matter his/her ride

loud pipes DO NOT save lives, despite the bumper stickers

Always smile and be polite, it's about who YOU are

If it's got two wheels and your visor has bugs on it, smile

If your chaps are weather beaten, nuff said

Link to comment
russell_bynum
I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes.

 

Next time you're "out for a ride" & come upon an unskilled rider, instead of getting irritated or nervous, why not wave them over & offer some suggestions. They might blow you off, but I'd bet they'd appreciate it. You don't have to spend a lot of time to make a big difference.

 

I've never done this, as it only occurred to me as I was reading this thread. But given the opportunity, I will.

 

The life you save may be theirs.

 

Let us know how that works out for you. thumbsup.gif

Link to comment

I've found that there's only a few very close friends I can tear up the twisties with and trust implicitly. If I'm forced to ride with new people, I stay in the rear and observe.

 

I was leading a ride some years ago with a few new people. One guy had an older R100RS that had some serious fairing scrapes on it. I should have known better but I was in lead on some twisties north of Detroit when out of the blue this same goof passes me on the inside almost forcing me into oncoming traffic. If ever there was a time when I should have sucker punched someone........., but I held it in.

 

Use it as a learning experience.

 

rpg

Link to comment

Tony

Since I live in the same land you speak of I will agree with your comments. There was no way I was going to offer riding advice 600 miles from home to a bunch of selfish lane hogs (no pun intended) while I had at least 400 miles to ride that day.

Link to comment
Officer_Impersonator

Last weekend I was out riding across the Kitsap Peninsula, on my way to the Olympic Peninsula. The first part of my journey involved a 35 minute ferry ride from Edmonds to Kingston.

 

On Washington State Ferries, motorcycles get priority loading, so we all park together at the bow of the boat.

 

I'm sitting on my RT-P when the stereotypical Harley guy walks up to me. He's got the "HELMET LAWS SUCK" head scarf on, the black leather jacket, the black leather chaps, black jeans, black Harley t-shirt, black boots, black beanie "helmet", black sunglasses, and a big black Harley with an American flag flying off the rear rack.

 

He walks up, looks at my bike from front to back, shakes his head, and states "There's only one kind of motorcycle, and that's Harley-Davidson, and your's isn't a Harley, so I don't know what you're sitting on".

 

His jest seemed good-natured, and I was surrounded by other riders - BMWs, Japanese sport bikes, etc., so I reply with my stock joke:

 

"What's the difference between a Harley and a vacuum cleaner? It's all in how you attach the dirt bag"

 

He chuckles and then proceeds to tell me how he raced cops on RT-Ps down in Arizona and kicked their asses because his bike has a 123 cubic inch engine and the cops were jealous so they all got Harleys and they they hired him to bore out their engines to 123 inches so they could be cool too blah blah blah. The B.S. started piling up fast.

 

After we rode off the ferry, the 15 or so riders all traveled in a pack down the two lane highway. Shortly thereafter, it began to lightly rain. I flip down the face shield, zip up the 'Stich, raise the windscreen a bit, and settle in for a brief rain squall. The Harley guys - every single one of them - including Mr. Harley referenced above - all peel off into a grocery store parking lot to wait out the rain. As I pulled away from the stop light in front of the grocery store, I could see at least two of them pulling out tarps from their luggage to protect the bikes from the rain.

 

Now who rides the real motorcycle? The one who has to run and hide from a little rain shower, or the one who keeps on riding?

 

Call me a Hardley basher, but until the real world stops living up to the negative Harley stereotypes, I'll continue to believe the negative Harley stereotypes.

Link to comment
wrestleantares
Would you believe out of the 75-90 bikes I actually passed those 3 times ONLY 2 RIDERS pulled into the right side of the lane to let us pass. I was not a happy camper with their etiquette or their skill level.

 

What about the etiquette of passing them in their lane. If they are not comfortable sharing their lane then they should not move. And if you cannot safely pass without them moving you have no business going around them.

Link to comment

I have been riding for almost 20 years and when over taking riders who first of all, look in their mirrors, they have moved over to let me or anyone else pass. Not that day. The riders were intent to stay in their formation (except for the two who waved us by) and not let anyone pass them. It was incredibly obvious what was going on. I guess you had to be there to see it for yourself.

Link to comment
wrestleantares
I have been riding for almost 20 years and when over taking riders who first of all, look in their mirrors, they have moved over to let me or anyone else pass.

 

So what? It does not mean they have to. I practically live on the Blue Ridge Parkway. As long as it is not closed I am on it at least weekly. Of course in the summer/spring it is crowded. Crowded with all sorts of riders. Some move over and wave me by, others don't. Usually the larger formations do not move at all, and more often than not they are riding cruisers, but I've seen the same fromGW's and sportbike groups.

 

 

Not that day. The riders were intent to stay in their formation (except for the two who waved us by) and not let anyone pass them. It was incredibly obvious what was going on. I guess you had to be there to see it for yourself.

 

No, we've all been there (well if you live in an area where the packs come out). It's a cost of sharing the road. And I don't know about you, but I do not want to be passing an inexperienced rider in their lane anyway.

Link to comment

I guess... but it's been my experience (as limited as that may be) that then 'inexperienced' riders are the most likely to be toting a 'tude.

Link to comment
I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes.

 

Next time you're "out for a ride" & come upon an unskilled rider, instead of getting irritated or nervous, why not wave them over & offer some suggestions. They might blow you off, but I'd bet they'd appreciate it. You don't have to spend a lot of time to make a big difference.

 

I've never done this, as it only occurred to me as I was reading this thread. But given the opportunity, I will.

 

The life you save may be theirs.

 

thumbsup.gif Well done! I hope that someday I too can see through the cynicism and sarcasm of the world! It could be an interested spin off of a tech daze. Getting together in small groups and going over technique and maybe even setting up a course in an empty parking lot.

 

I don't see any sarcasm or cynicism; but if I was on my scoot & some random and unknown dude tried to offer some riding tips, I think I'd be quite likely to tell him to F.O. Now, that same info coming from a trusted source, that's different; I'd filter it and use what I could, disregard the rest. It's similar to the riding gear quandry, nicewife & I are ATGATT, the 3 gals that were on this particular ride with us were far from it. It was their choice, and it wasn't up to me (or nicewife) to tell some other adult who is responsible for their own actions that their choices were wrong.

Link to comment

Yeah, and I don't know how many times I've had other riders tell me that the secret to a really tight figure 8 is to just lightly 'feather the front brake.'

Link to comment
Yeah, and I don't know how many times I've had other riders tell me that the secret to a really tight figure 8 is to just lightly 'feather the front brake.'

 

Hence the reason to use a trusted source, not an unknown one.

Link to comment
Yeah, and I don't know how many times I've had other riders tell me that the secret to a really tight figure 8 is to just lightly 'feather the front brake.'

 

Well, it is easier to do a figure 8 with the bike on its side. Just use the footpegs to pivot. wink.gif

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...