Jump to content

Is it time to say goodbye?


Blue Beemer Dude

Recommended Posts

Blue Beemer Dude

I've been through this before, and have talked with my SO about it, and she's against it... but I'm thinking of selling the bike. And I want to hear your opinions.

 

First, I've been riding on and off since I was 19, and since 1999 I've had at least one motorcycle except for a brief break for about 9 months. Right now I've got a 2004 RT which I generally love, farkled to the nines. I used to put about 5K a year on this and former bikes.

 

Last Summer I hit Bambi (some of you may remember the post) which didn't damage me or the bike, but it sure as shit scared me to death! blush.gif Shortly after that, after one of those "life is too short" moments, I bought my Porsche 911 cabriolet. Now when the weather is nice or I just feel like going out, it's the cab that gets driven, not the Beemer. I don't ride it to work anymore because traffic is just too bad around here (and my commute sucks anyway), I'm one of those ATGATT folks so in the Summer I'm really burning up and pretty-much won't ride past 10 AM during the Summer months. A couple of weeks ago I went out for an early Sunday ride (7:30 AM) and as I rounded the turn, there's Bambi's mom and dad, standing in the middle of the road like a bunch of stupid animals. They ran off, but once again it shook me up to realize how many of those stupid critters are around. So now I'm thinking of just getting rid of the bike. Oh, and although I'm just barely 46 (next week) it's gotten to the point where after 45 minutes, my legs, my wrists and especially my butt and back are bothering me a lot. I swapped back from my Corbin seat to stock and yes, the Corbin is much better. I have a backrest that helps and I am actually in decent shape - I exercise 4 days a week, but I just don't do well when I can't move. I can stop and rest every 45 minutes, but even then after a couple of hours I'm really getting wasted. As safety is a big concern for me, I limit my rides so that I don't get too tired and too sore.

 

The upside is that I still enjoy it, on those rare occasions that I go riding and can avoid traffic and the critters. I hate all of the stupid people out on MY roads, the kids learning to drive, the idiots talking on their phones, the morons speeding and tailgating. But when I can get "in the zone" and the bike is running good, there's just nothing like it. It's just that those moments seem to be further and further apart.

 

Am I just too much of a pussy? bncry.gif Should I buck it up, be a man, and enjoy it while I still can?

 

Thanks,

 

Michael

Link to comment

If you still enjoy the occasional ride it's just a financial question whether to keep the bike, since you bought a Porsche I imagine you can afford to keep the RT - what's the downside of keeping it?

Link to comment
I've been through this before, and have talked with my SO about it, and she's against it... but I'm thinking of selling the bike. And I want to hear your opinions.

 

First, I've been riding on and off since I was 19, and since 1999 I've had at least one motorcycle except for a brief break for about 9 months. Right now I've got a 2004 RT which I generally love, farkled to the nines. I used to put about 5K a year on this and former bikes.

 

Last Summer I hit Bambi (some of you may remember the post) which didn't damage me or the bike, but it sure as shit scared me to death! blush.gif Shortly after that, after one of those "life is too short" moments, I bought my Porsche 911 cabriolet. Now when the weather is nice or I just feel like going out, it's the cab that gets driven, not the Beemer. I don't ride it to work anymore because traffic is just too bad around here (and my commute sucks anyway), I'm one of those ATGATT folks so in the Summer I'm really burning up and pretty-much won't ride past 10 AM during the Summer months. A couple of weeks ago I went out for an early Sunday ride (7:30 AM) and as I rounded the turn, there's Bambi's mom and dad, standing in the middle of the road like a bunch of stupid animals. They ran off, but once again it shook me up to realize how many of those stupid critters are around. So now I'm thinking of just getting rid of the bike. Oh, and although I'm just barely 46 (next week) it's gotten to the point where after 45 minutes, my legs, my wrists and especially my butt and back are bothering me a lot. I swapped back from my Corbin seat to stock and yes, the Corbin is much better. I have a backrest that helps and I am actually in decent shape - I exercise 4 days a week, but I just don't do well when I can't move. I can stop and rest every 45 minutes, but even then after a couple of hours I'm really getting wasted. As safety is a big concern for me, I limit my rides so that I don't get too tired and too sore.

 

The upside is that I still enjoy it, on those rare occasions that I go riding and can avoid traffic and the critters. I hate all of the stupid people out on MY roads, the kids learning to drive, the idiots talking on their phones, the morons speeding and tailgating. But when I can get "in the zone" and the bike is running good, there's just nothing like it. It's just that those moments seem to be further and further apart.

 

Am I just too much of a pussy? bncry.gif Should I buck it up, be a man, and enjoy it while I still can?

 

Thanks,

 

Michael

 

Michael, simple answer.. If you don’t feel comfortable or it isn’t fun to ride anymore DON’T.. Riding is supposed to be fun if it isn’t find another venue that is..

 

Twisty

Link to comment
Blue Beemer Dude
If you still enjoy the occasional ride it's just a financial question whether to keep the bike, since you bought a Porsche I imagine you can afford to keep the RT - what's the downside of keeping it?

 

Man, that was quick! It costs me about $300 a year to insure it, another $150 or so in property tax and the usual maintenance costs as I do annual brake fluid flush, oil change, diff, regardless of mileage and tires every 6K miles or so. So, if I didn't ride it much, it would just be around $500 to have it sit there. We will ignore depreciation costs since they should be minimal at this point.

Link to comment

After reading your post I see alot of reasons/excuses you list for not riding...

 

It's a tough decision but if you are unsure stop riding for awhile ( for your own safety) keep the bike and if the urge comes back to devote your skills to riding again start slow and remember how enjoyable the ride is not how bad it could be...

 

 

my 2 cents

Link to comment
bakerzdosen

Well, I haven't met Bambi up close and personally, but I will add this:

 

I bought my bike early last summer. From the day I bought it until earlier this spring the top didn't go down once on my convertible. Why? The convertible just because transportation for occasions that I couldn't ride the bike. I think it was just a newness thing. However, now, I find myself enjoying both of them.

 

My point is this: Give it time. I agree with Bob. If you need the money and you're sure you'll never ride again, sell it. If you don't need the money now (a 911 cabrio isn't exactly a cheap checkout aisle impulse buy kinda thing), keep the bike. I'm betting you'll be glad you did in a while.

 

Worse case scenario (IMHO): You never ride the bike again and lose a little bit of cash on resale. However, I'm betting you will ride it again - and enjoy it.

Link to comment

Michael, your post echoes my thoughts from three years ago when I hit a deer out west on my '02 RT. (Except for the getting a 911 part!).

 

For a few weeks I wouldn't even look at my R90s or R75/5 sitting there in the garage (my RT was totalled). I seriously thought it was time to give it up based on how quickly a damn deer can ruin your day.

 

But slowly I came to miss the ride into work and the Sunday rides with friends. And I got back on the R90s one day and I knew I couldn't give it up. Like a 20 year old Latin mistress, you have thoughts of letting it go but the aroma, smells and sounds are just too strong.

 

So I picked up another RT (a beautiful silver '04) and was back. The deer still scare the crap out of me and I find myself still enjoying a quick jaunt on Michigan's finest twisties but DO slow down quite a bit when the woods get thick. Don't think I'll ever get over the feeling of that Big Buck coming out of nowhere.

 

Yesterday I took a three hour lunch and rode the RT to my cottage and back (about 200 miles). It was an excellent way to clear the stress from the morning meetings and the RT proved to be the right therapy. At 90mph, the Big Twin has an effortless gait and really enforces the notion of how good this bike is.

 

Hope you continue to ride but maybe take a break for a few months. I would not, repeat NOT sell the bike just yet.

 

A 911 is a 911 but it's still a car.

 

Rick G

 

Only you can decide.

Link to comment
Dave McReynolds

I've been through the same thing myself from time to time. I've never been a high miler either; 5,000 most years, maybe up to 10,000 in years when I get in a long tour.

 

Sometimes when the motorcycle sat too long in the garage, I would wonder, as you do, what's the point of letting the dust accumulate on it and paying the carrying charges?

 

Twice, over the years, I sold the bikes. The feeling of not carrying unwanted baggage was quite liberating, for a while. Funny, I never sold the gear, which I had invested well over a thousand in, thinking I might want to rent a motorcycle occasionally or that I would only get pennies back on my cost anyway.

 

Then, after some months, usually when the weather turns great for riding about March, I would miss having a motorcycle. About that time, a new one would show up in the garage.

 

This periodic buying and selling has been expensive, but not so much that it's caused me to cut back on anything of importance of a more basic nature to me or my family. On balance, I would say that having a motorcycle when I want one, and not having a motorcycle when I don't want one has been worth the cost for my peace of mind.

Link to comment

It's an age thing... something goes wrong with our wiring around age 45. We start thinking about our mortality and legacy [or lack thereof]. Our bodies annoy us daily with the aches and pains and those inevitable trips to the doctor or dentist for things that "happened to our parents."

 

Then, you get over and go for ride. grin.gif

Link to comment

Several years ago I gave up chewing tobacco..Life hasn't been near as much fun since.. bncry.gif Simple answer..If you can give up riding and still be happy you should give it up. I keep hoping to lose interest, but so far no luck. frown.gif

Link to comment
Have two Porsches, still ride bikes.

 

I bought my 12RT and the now the Porsche stays in the garage. I only drive it on Friday's to work.

Link to comment

Michael, if it were me, I'd park the bike for a while. Prep it for storage and let it sit until next spring. Don't worry about it. Enjoy your new car.

 

Next spring you might decide that you want to ride or you might decide that you're happy without a bike. Or you may find that you want a different bike.

Link to comment

Trust the SO on this one. She is right whenever she agrees with anything pro-cycling and doesn't understand when she is in favor of anything as ludicrous as selling a perfectly good motorcycle--especially if it is your only one. Keep it.

Of course, this is advice that I should have listened to right before I sold each of my previous bikes. Keeping it is cheap--takes up little space--and assures that the bike will be there whenever you get the urge to ride.

If you are set on selling it, though, I will give you five dollars for it to take the burden off of your hands.

Keep it!

Link to comment

Maverick: My options, Sir.

Viper: Simple. First you've acquired enough points to show up tomorrow and graduate with your Top Gun class, or you can quit. There'd be no disgrace. That spin was hell, it would've shook me up.

Maverick: So you think I should quit?

Viper: I didn't say that. The simple fact is you feel responsible for Goose and you have a confidence problem. Now I'm not gonna sit here and blow sunshine up your ass, Lieutenant. A good pilot is compelled to evaluate what's happened, so he can apply what he's learned. Up there, we gotta push it. That's our job. It's your option Lieutenant. All yours.

Link to comment

Mike:

 

Maybe a smaller, different bike is in order. Something with a different character (you pick). A few years ago I was knocked of the GL-1500 I was riding. Your standard issue, no license, no insurance, POS car/guy. It was on the Cal-91 hwy, east bound, where it merges with the Cal-241 Toll Road, north bound. I was hit from behind, and as I was flying thru the air I remember thinking "something's wrong with this . . ." Then, THUD, down on the pavement. No lasting injuries, (ATGATT) bike was repaired, a couple days off work to get thru the pain & stiff muscles. Next commute to work was on my XR-650-L. That worked for me, and it could work for you; those 2 bikes were so different that it felt "new" when I went to the office on the XR. That's why I thought maybe a different bike could spark the interest. Bear with me, if your not touring, a touring bike can start to feel a bit oversized, & difficult to maneuver in tight traffic choked areas. A smaller bike, a lighter bike, a more nimble bike, might be in order - beacuse: "The upside is I still enjoy it . . ." If you still get a charge out of it, keep the bike, if the pre-ride to post-ride becomes too chore like, then it would probably be time to let the RT loose.

Link to comment

Went through this same sort of thing after I crashed in 2003. I had crashed before but this one scared the crap out of me! Didn't ride for a little over a year until I started noticing every bike on the road and bought an RT. . I really missed riding and have ridden about 30,000 miles since getting back on a bike. I wouldn't sell the bike just yet, latter you might really want to start riding again.

Link to comment

Once the new-ness of the Porsche wears off I bet you will be riding the bike more. Since I got my 06-RT I don't spend nearly time that I use to driving the vette. The newest toy always gets more attention.

Link to comment
russell_bynum
Michael, if it were me, I'd park the bike for a while. Prep it for storage and let it sit until next spring. Don't worry about it. Enjoy your new car.

 

Next spring you might decide that you want to ride or you might decide that you're happy without a bike. Or you may find that you want a different bike.

 

I like this answer best.

Link to comment

Went through the same symptoms as you and that others have mentioned. \For me it was hard core off road racing. First David Bailey got paralyzed damn near in front of me, then McGoo Chandler ended up paralyzed. Then there was me staring at a Ponderosa Pine trunk of obout 3' in diameter while tapped out in 4th gear in a race that I was barely able to pull my head back in time out of the way. Can you say "bug splat"?

I sold my bikes and didn't buy another one for 15 years. Now the "bug" is back. I can't imagine NOT riding now.

How long it will take for the "bike bug" to bite you again, only time will tell. You WILL eventually miss riding. It's in your blood. The upside is there will always be more and better motorcycles around when that time comes. thumbsup.gif

Link to comment
Michael, simple answer.. If you don’t feel comfortable or it isn’t fun to ride anymore DON’T.. Riding is supposed to be fun if it isn’t find another venue that is..

 

Twisty

 

Affirmative. I quit riding twice, both times it was due to my having so many close calls/near accidents that I lost the nerve to continue riding. I went 17 years without a bike and when I felt the time was right I jumped back in with both feet. Now I have three motorcycles and an empty bank account grin.gif but I'm enjoying riding now more than ever. thumbsup.gif

 

Listen to those "gut feelings," you can always get back into the sport in the future!

Link to comment

Like many others, I find that my interest in certain hobbies has its natural "ups and downs".

 

After 3 fairly high mileage seasons from 03 to 05 (at least for me, about 45K miles total over 3 riding seasons), I felt the need for a bit of a break last year. I also got a sporty new car, which was calling out to me more than my 02 GS.

 

Last year, 06, I put no more than 2K miles on my bike. It sat in the garage most of the time.

 

This year, the urge to ride has rekindled. I am riding more and am planning a cross country trip. In fact I am quite excited about it.

 

All to say that, at the end of the day you should do what feels right, but you might want to wait a while before you sell it, to see if your feelings play out differently-----you might find the urge rekindles.

 

I think you are smart to ask the question in a thoughtful way, good on you!!

 

Cheers......Rod

Link to comment
Like a 20 year old Latin mistress, you have thoughts of letting it go but the aroma, smells and sounds are just too strong.

 

Rick G

 

Only you can decide.

 

I love that visual! lmao.gif I played tennis 3-4 times a week for about seven years and one day I stopped having fun playing it. I dropped the racquet and have not played since. If it's not fun, don't do it. Life is too short.

 

If it's fun, do it.

Link to comment
Like a 20 year old Latin mistress, you have thoughts of letting it go but the aroma, smells and sounds are just too strong.

 

 

 

 

Man that's powerful..I must have read that line 20 times over the last 10 minutes as I sit here reminiscing ... grin.gif

Link to comment
Like a 20 year old Latin mistress, you have thoughts of letting it go but the aroma, smells and sounds are just too strong.

Temporary hijack: What's the difference between aroma and smells?

 

We now return to our regular program

Link to comment

Once you have been with a Latina, you will never forget it. clap.gif But don't try to take them home to Momma. She won't like'em.confused.gif

 

Should you give up riding? It really sounds like you have made up your mind and you just want us to convince you that you are right. We are all wired different and we ride for different reasons. When I was 23 (a few years ago), my 26 yr old best friend died skydiving. Everyone said what a tragedy. But I always thought it wasn't. At 26, he had @1400 jumps, had a tour of Viet Nam, was a scuba diver, was lead singer in a rock-n-roll band, rode bikes, drove a yellow corvette, dated Miss Illinois, etc, etc, etc. For ME, life is not the number of breaths you take, but the times your breath was taken away.

But that is just me.

 

DrJ

Link to comment
MichiganBob

I got addicted to golf about ten years ago. On a real nice Michigan day, and this is hard to admit, I would rather hit the links with my buddies, have a few stoogies and beers than ride my Beemer. Now I have ridden for 35 years and logged almost 300,000 over that time period on my 5 Beemers. I love my 02RT and still take it on vacation twice a year and a Sunday blast every now and then. Even did a six week 8k to Alaska last year. All I am saying is that other things are at the front of the line for me right now.

 

But I think your situation is a little different and might not be just a simple change of tastes. Those damn traumas can affect us in all kinds of ways. Yes, I'm talking about PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. These frightening traumas create all kinds of physiological, mental and emotional turmoil. Sometimes, the symptomotology is very obvious but it can also be very covert (like a distant nagging feeling of dread). On a trip many years ago, my buddy t-boned Bambi at 75mph. He had bad dreams and some problems riding at night (even in the car) for two years. As a clinical social worker, I know about this stuff. Started working with returning vets from Vietnam in the 60's, bad acid trip folks in the 70's, abused children in the 80's and so on. All I'm saying is that it would be worth your while to do a little search on the web about PTSD. There are some self-administered instruments you can take that assesses PTSD. And there are some good ways to deal with it, particularly cognitive restructuring. Anyhow, my two cents. Go with your gut. Don't let anyway guilt you. Enjoy the precious time you have left on this celestial ball.

 

Bob

Link to comment

Why are you asking us, you know that we are all pro-riding... Yes, you hear a bit of caution here, but by and large we say ride. You think you should give it up you ask your co-worker that drives a Saturn and thinks bikes are the most dangerous thing on the planet. She'll tell you to give it up.

 

So, you chose to ask us, what does this say: To me, you are looking for reassurance, confidence, and comaraderie. Advice on how to work through these feelings. You are not looking to quit, but trying find a path forward.

 

Here's my idea, take the MSF BRC course (again?), or any other courses in your area. Find out how good you are! Stack it up against some peers! See how fast that bike can stop. Learn some statistics and facts about biking. Practice some manuevers. See how well that bike can turn. Ride in a safe, structured environment some.

 

Then decide.

Link to comment

I think giving it a rest for this year is a great idea. Just cover it up and go enjoy your 911. I have wavered back and forth many times, safety always the issue. I think time does help heal some of those emotional wounds and, let's face it, you have a great new toy, what better medicine can you have for now.

 

We have had two people crash in the last month, one died and one had a leg amputated. That started my mind frenzie again, should I ride or just hang it up? I am giving it a break now for other reasons, but in the end....................no matter what, aren't we always suppose to be just a bit afraid out there? Isn't that part of what keeps our heads on a swivel when we ride and our senses all at their highest level? A bit of fear is ok, too much takes all the fun away. It won't break you to store the bike for a year, and it won't depreciate that much so I say maybe mull this info over, along with the great advice you have already received.

 

Bambi's scare the hell out of me too!!

Link to comment

Life happens, shit happens...totally depends upon your tolerance and fatalistic levels!

Me....I almost died twice - one my fault and the other cancer. Wrecked cars, wrecked bikes, racing accidents, my fault, someone elses fault, lousy weather, crap on the road.

 

I certainly haven't given up anything when it comes to enjoying MY life...especially hope. Deal with it or not...as you like, when your number is up..that's it. If you let someone else decide it for you, you will ALWAYS second guess it. My 2 cents.... thumbsup.gif

Link to comment

i bought my first bike 2 1/2 years ago. a 2004 1150 rt. i like riding so much i sold my car. i am also moving to northern nevada from the vegas area just for the riding. i turned 60 in march. couldn't think of not riding!!!!!

Link to comment

Hi,

 

I was in a somewhat similar situation in that I have ridden many years and 1.5 years ago I sold my motorcycle. I still enjoyed riding, although with all the nonsense on the roads it became less so. But, I was involved in triathlon training and I literally had little to no time to ride and then a good friend of mine was involved in a horrendous accident that to be honest scared the bejeezus out of me. My friends accident coupled with my utilitarian approach to things felt I could not justify the expense when it was sitting in my garage. So I sold it and all my gear. Friends of mine suggested I stick it in a corner of my garage and it would then be there if I changed my mind. Well i have begun to have a change of situation and mind and cursed the day I sold it. So all this to say... think good and hard and perhaps hang on to it a while longer to see if you have a change of heart.

Link to comment

Don't let a financial decision keep you on a bike, when you are no longer comfortable being on a bike.

 

The fact is that motorcyle riding is dangerous, you have to keep that in perspective. You must have all your wits about you when on the bike, and if you are out there nervous about what could jump out at any turn you are more inclined to make a mistake, or have those "survival instincts" kick in and potentially get into the situation you are nervous about already.

 

Honestly, it would be hard to give up a bike like that, especially when you have put so much into the aftermarket accessories. I had an RT that I loved and sold it for something sportier, and kick myself everytime I take a long trip. Maybe the best option is to park it for a while, a season or so and see if the motorcycle bug bites you again. If it doesn't depeciation on these bikes are not too bad, you won't have lost much if you decide to make the sale.

 

Just my .02

Link to comment

An issue many of us have dealt with. Question for you BBD: is it better to mothball or sell and get a new bike when you decide to rejoin? BTDT! smirk.gif For me it was the latter.

Link to comment

I guess I just don't see the difference.

 

One could be killed in a car accident as readily as a bike accident.

 

Were all gonna die sooner or later. Death is an "equal opportunity" arrangement. Death is dealt out one each. No more no less ... but everybody gets one for sure.

 

If it is your time and place you could be standing in a crosswalk and get it.

 

Where I live there are more skiers killed in avalanche than bikers on motorcycles.

 

A young fellow (26 years old) died last week not far from where I live ... what was he doing? ... fishing! ... it started to rain and as he stood under a tree lightening got him.

 

By the time I had reached 20 years old I had lost 3 school friends ...

 

What was their fate?

 

Work place accidents.

 

I considered never working but that didn't work out for me as I like to eat too ... tongue.gif

 

Personally I would rather go out on a bike than rust out on the couch.

 

I mean if your really serious about this ... is public transit an option in your case? dopeslap.gif

Link to comment

My suggestion is to put up the bike until Fall. Summer around here is too hot and miserable on an RT. Come Fall, take hwy 86 out of Hillsborough up to Danville,VA. From Danville go 29 to Altavista and then 43 over through Bedford to the BlueRidge Parkway. Go down the Parkway to mile marker 177 and stay at the Willville motorcycle campground. Talk to whoever is there about it possibly being your fairwell ride. See if they can't rekindle your enthusiasm.

 

Oh, and take me with you. smile.gif

Link to comment

After being hit by a semi and then doing a couple of low sides. dopeslap.gif I decided that I had enough for a while. Sold my bikes and took a break for several years. I always missed the riding tho. I finially got the itch again and bought my first BMW R11RS. Got my nerve back after a year and then traded the RS in for a RT and haven't looked back. If you're uncomfortable, there is no shame in hanging 'em up for a while and wait for the itch to return.

Link to comment
The upside is that I still enjoy it, on those rare occasions that I go riding and can avoid traffic and the critters.

 

- I don't commute on my bike

- I am not an IBA candidate

- I don't ride every weekend

- I don't like the heat or traffic either

 

- But, I do get out for a couple of trips each year and the odd Sunday morning ride which are throughly enjoyable. As far as I am concerened, the bike can just sit there and wait for me.

 

- ebill

 

ps: Happy 'born-day' next week there BBD !

Link to comment

If you give it up it will haunt you. I was hit by an old man who turned left in front of me and gave it up for 24 years. After that every bike that went by gave me neck strain. If I happened on some riders and chatted for awhile I felt left out. My old riding buddy would call me to tell me he was going on tour and wished I was coming. Occasionally I'd pick up a bike magazine and would feel lost.

 

If it's in your blood it won't go away. If BMW twins are in your blood they don't go away either.

 

My wife of 20 years tells me that since I got Nubb I'm mellower, happier, and a more content person. Just can't seem to convince her to ride. Oh well, I'll solo!!

 

If it's paid for keep it. Better to have it than to wish you did.

 

 

 

ISYHTRAH

Link to comment
Blue Beemer Dude

- ebill

 

ps: Happy 'born-day' next week there BBD !

 

Thanks, ebill. Dang, you look familiar! wink.gif

 

 

Hey - thanks everyone for your comments. I am going to help my girlfriend clean up her garage tomorrow and then I'll move the bike in there. That way it's still available but it's not staring me in the face all the time. As the weather cools or if the mood hits me, I'll go for a ride.

 

If it ends up being ignored into next Spring, then I'll consider selling it for good. If things get better, I'll move it back home and/or trade it for a naked bike (the new Roadster, for instance).

 

Ya'all be careful out there! grin.gif

 

Michael

Link to comment

Sometimes a "change is as good as a rest", when I lived and worked in a city I sold my bikes and got out because every day I felt like I was playing russian roulette with the traffic.So for a few years I got into horses.

I now live in the country, don't own anymore horses and am riding bikes again.

I can't say what my interests will be next year, but I will say that I wish I had a couple of the classic bikes, and one horse that I so carelessly sold because I thought I "was done" with this form of entertainment.

Link to comment

As one Michael to another: I have been struggling with this same question for the last few months. Was diagnosed with terminal cancer in spring of '05 and bought myself a RT, so I could indulge my wishes. Went through 6 months of hospice care and all the good stuff (chemo, rad.tx, laser bronchoscopy, etc.). Now, here it is more than 2 years years later and I am still alive. My oncologist made a joke about it yesterday, saying I was one of his favorite patients, because a)I seem to be holding my own, though I can feel myself going downhill physically and mentally, somewhat.

b)German machinery may uplift the spirits, he said. He has a beautiful, dark blue Porsche convertible and knows I ride an RT.

Hope all the answers here have given you some direction; there is no shame in hanging up the boots. It's dangerous enough out there just driving a cage. You have a wife and kids, I presume; so they enter into the equation, too. Good luck with your decision. Best Wishes, Michael

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...