Jump to content

Ceramic coating on valve covers?


Dr Klawn

Recommended Posts

Since I'm planning on getting my header pipes ceramic coated (Performance Coatings In Auburn, WA) to reduce heat adjacent to the RSL (lower) fairing panels I'll be installing soon, I was wondering if this finish would work well on the valve covers? My right one got pretty rashed last year with a slow tip while on some gravel..... Any thoughts?

 

It also looks like there's a coating on the inside of the covers - not sure if this is similar to a "Glyptal" type of thing?

 

Thanks for the help!

Link to comment

Check with them, but I don't think they can do ceramic coating over paint.

 

FWIW, I also don't think their coating will provide enough heat insulation for what you are expecting. It's mostly for cosmetics.

Link to comment
Joe Frickin' Friday
Check with them, but I don't think they can do ceramic coating over paint.

 

Maybe not, but the paint can be blasted/stripped easily enough.

Link to comment
Check with them, but I don't think they can do ceramic coating over paint.

 

FWIW, I also don't think their coating will provide enough heat insulation for what you are expecting. It's mostly for cosmetics.

 

Ken,

 

I've read many posts on several forums (including this one) of the significant reduction in heat on the header pipes - the coating is on both the interior and exterior, and basically passes the heat on down the pipe... Time will tell.

 

Linky: http://performancecoatings.com/headercoatings.html

(no affilation, etc.)

 

I was just thinking that the chromex coating (closest to a "polished" finsh) would look fairly nice on the valve covers. They would strip the existing paint to the bare aluminum prior to coating. My other option is to go the rattle can treatment to save some dough.

Link to comment
Joe Frickin' Friday
My other option is to go the rattle can treatment to save some dough.

 

It'll certainly cost less for a single application, but my experience has been that canned spray paint, at least when used on forward-facing surfaces, doesn't stand up very well to road miles; within 10K miles it's badly pockmarked, and eventually the paint will be completely blasted away.

 

OTOH, powdercoat is cured in place on the part and is unbelievably tough stuff. I screwed up the coating on an item last year, and when I went to sandblast the coating off, I found that I couldn't do it; I was blasting on the same spot for about a minute without breaking through to bare metal.

 

I found some chrome-simulating powdercoat recently; this summer my dad wants me to coat the hubcaps on their big RV trailer, on which the original chrome plating isn't holding up very well. I just got a couple of pounds of it last week, and I think this winter I'm going to take the extra and PC my valve covers, which are looking pretty tired after 120K miles. We'll see how it holds up during the 2008 season...

Link to comment
Joe Frickin' Friday
chromehead004.jpg

 

chromehead003.jpg

 

Gadzukes, that looks like something out of an H.R. Giger painting!

 

Hrgigeralien.jpg

 

Is that actual chrome plate, or powder?

Link to comment

These are covers from a chromehead (R1200C)

 

I had to modify the plug covers to fit over the dual spark coils.

 

chromehead001.jpg

 

Looks better than the pictures

Link to comment
Any thoughts?

 

Just that powder coating is gonna be less than half the cost of new chrome covers... and they've got some powder coat that is very close to a chrome finish now.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...