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R1100RT Rear tire


Stephen_Chase

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Firefight911

Sure, but one would have to ask why?

 

Tubeless rim and tire.

 

If for the purpose of resolving an unresolveable flat, go for it. Don't leave it there.

 

Many, much easier, alternatives for fixing a flat rather than taking the wheel off, breaking the bead, etc.

 

Help us with letting us know the why. thumbsup.gif

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Stephen_Chase

Good point. dopeslap.gif

 

The Michelin Pilot had 300 miles when I picked up a staple in the tread section. According to good advice from this site it should not be plugged & I cannot get it patched anywhere nearby.

 

Thus, the tube option. If a tube will work, I can use an otherwise good tire.clap.gif

 

Stephen

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I think you would much safer to properly patch/plug the tire than run a tube in it. If a good through the tire spiked patch is properly installed from the inside the tire should be fine. That is assuming that the punture did not damage a cord, and the tire wasn't damaged by running flat or over heating. Installing a tube will require removing the existing valve stem and using the existing hole for the tubes valve stem to run through. The hole has "square" edges and may damage the tubes valve stem. You will increase unsprung weight, and may cause unwanted heating in the tire. It will also be VERY difficult to install the tube. Tubeless tires have much stiffer sidewalls that tube type. It is hard to not to wrinkle the tube, or get it caught between the rim and tire. My advice would be to properly patch the tire, or junk it. Most NAPA stores sell the good patches the glue that goes with them.

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ShovelStrokeEd

Snod has it right except for one point but it is a very important one. Tubeless tires when inflated, actually have less stiff side walls than tubed ones, they are stiffer when off the rim due to a much stiffer rim band. The extra flex in the tubeless tire will quickly cause the tube to fail. There is a second point in that the low profile of the tubeless tire is not the same as the profile of a tubed tire, assuming you can even find a tube of the correct size. The tube will not form a shape for which it was designed, leading to further concentration of forces on the side walls of the tube.

 

In short, don't do it.

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russell_bynum
Good point. dopeslap.gif

 

The Michelin Pilot had 300 miles when I picked up a staple in the tread section. According to good advice from this site it should not be plugged & I cannot get it patched anywhere nearby.

 

Thus, the tube option. If a tube will work, I can use an otherwise good tire.clap.gif

 

Stephen

 

Bah.

 

Just patch it and ride.

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ShovelStrokeEd

Wouldn't surprise me if you found vulcanizing patches in a bicycle store. There are alternatives to this. There are tire plugs designed to be put in from the inside that have a large surface area top on them and do not require vulcanization to provide an effective seal. Canadian Tire should carry them as well as the tools for installation.

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