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Don't buy a Shoei Helmet!


maxfrankel

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maxfrankel

A couple of visor screws fell off my Shoei, so I lost them and the plastic cap that affixes the visor to that side of the helmet. Contacted Shoei only to be informed that they no longer have those parts. So a $300 helmet is now useless because of Shoei's lousy customer support. Last Shoei I buy!

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Wow! That's really surprising. How old is the Shoei? What model? Could a local dealer help you out?

 

I suppose the next question becomes: At what point is the expectation unreasonable that a vendor will offer support on a product.

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Aluminum_Butt

Well, I'll probably continue to buy Shoei, but perhaps it's worth reporting that mine did the same thing within about six months of owning it. In my case, I didn't lose any parts, but several parts of the mechanism were very loose and needed tightening.

 

Anybody else have this problem? Is it pervasive?

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Have had mine for about 6 months to. Just looked at it and

there doesn't seem to be anything loose.

Thanks for bringing it to light. I'll keep an eye on it.

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Silver Surfer/AKAButters

I had the same thing happen to my RF1000. Now I routinely make sure the screws are tight. This has not been a problem on my Multitech, however, I check it regularly also.

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Its happened to me, but the screws didn't fall out. Went to put it on and the visor didn't feel right. Checked the screws and the right side was very loose. Just checked it again (its been a couple of years) and the screws are still plenty tight. An annual check is probably all you need. Funny thing is, the day that I noticed the loose screw I was on my way to my wife's family reunion. Damned if it didn't take me a while to find something to tighten the screw and I missed the reunion. grin.gif

 

Jim

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If you put a little finger nail polish on the screws they wont come loose!!Its like a very lite loctite.. thumbsup.gif

 

Not going to ask where you got the nail polish. wink.gif I don't think I'll be buying any anyways soon. But thanks for the suggestion. If the screws do come loose maybe I'll try a little blue lock tight.

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Thanks Michael, I did not know that. I'll be sure and read the directions before use. Any other products out there that can be used?

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Do NOT use loctite on plastic. Loctite damages many plastics, causing them to crumble.
Thats why I use finger nail polish,It wont heart plastic,,and you can take the screw out if need be thumbsup.gif
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Had a similar thing happen to me but they did have the part...

 

Part was less than $.50, shipping was more than $10.00

 

I found a screw at a local Honda dealer and he gave it to me for free...

 

Trying looking around a bit ;-)

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Almost lost a screw on my RF900. I find it hard to believe they wouldn't have a part for a helmet less than 5 years old. I'm assuming 5 years is the suggested lifespan of a "safe" helmet, so there would be no reason for them to stock parts longer than 5 years.

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Almost lost a screw on my RF900. I find it hard to believe they wouldn't have a part for a helmet less than 5 years old.

If you look at Shoei's parts page, they even still have a listing for RF-800 parts.

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If you put a little finger nail polish on the screws they wont come loose!!Its like a very lite loctite.. thumbsup.gif

 

Not going to ask where you got the nail polish. wink.gif I don't think I'll be buying any anyways soon. But thanks for the suggestion. If the screws do come loose maybe I'll try a little blue lock tight.

 

I hope you have the right color outfit to go with that lock tight. lmao.gif

 

 

 

ISYHTRAH

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Can't say that this is always the case but I had some pieces fall off of my Shoei SychroTech (wish I'd known about that fingernail polish trick then). I called Shoei's customer service folks and after describing what had fallen off, the pleasant lady I spoke with sent me a complete package of parts for one side. No questions asked. Again, this is my experience, but I was impressed with their willingness to help and their level of customer service.

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Is the helmet in question listed on their parts page??
Thanks for the link, yet another I did'nt know about. I, too, replaced a Shoei helmet because I broke one of the shield mechanisms. Now I have another spare. smile.gif
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ShovelStrokeEd

They put slots in screws for a reason. Use 'em and you won't have a problem. All the whining about maintenance on bikes here and folks won't do minimal maintenance/inspection on their vital gear? Gimmee a break.

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PhillyFlash

I ordered two set of replacement screws for my Syncrotec. There are many other's here too. Just check this site:

http://www.shoei-helmets.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=333

 

I had the same problem 6 weeks after I bought my Shoei. Screw fell out, but found replacements back then at a BMW dealer. Now I check their tightness regularly, and have no complaints.

 

If you think your $300 helmet is worthless, ship it to me.

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Matts_12GS

i had a piece break off my shoei, I went to cycle gear and got a replacement set. $5 and they're open 7 days a week!

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+1 on the loose visor and screws, RF 1000. But I used my cheapo Coleman Multitool to tighten it up just right.

thumbsup.gif

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JerryMather
Almost lost a screw on my RF900. I find it hard to believe they wouldn't have a part for a helmet less than 5 years old. I'm assuming 5 years is the suggested lifespan of a "safe" helmet, so there would be no reason for them to stock parts longer than 5 years.

It happened to me also but, they sent me out a replacement set for FREE.

What model was yours?

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  • 3 weeks later...
A couple of visor screws fell off my Shoei, so I lost them and the plastic cap that affixes the visor to that side of the helmet. Contacted Shoei only to be informed that they no longer have those parts. So a $300 helmet is now useless because of Shoei's lousy customer support. Last Shoei I buy!

 

I had the same sort of issue with Shoei when the snap on the chin strap broke... It was two years old and they said...sorry, we have the new and improved snap and it is not compatible with thier helmet. I now ride with an Arai.

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Thanks Michael, I did not know that. I'll be sure and read the directions before use. Any other products out there that can be used?

Guess you will be looking for fingernail polish afterall I think you will be hot in red lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif Hey if you buy tampons with you nail polish the clerk will never know the polish is for you lmao.gif

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RF200
The circa 1992, RF200??? eek.gif

 

Dude, you gotta spring for a new helmet--for reasons of sanitation if nothing else! lmao.gif

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+1

 

A $300 helmet is only worth three hundred bucks until you leave the store with it. I would be thrilled to find parts for a fifteen year old helmet. Helmets have improved so much, that it's definitely worth it to replace your lid at this time.

 

"Don't buy a helmet from Shoei." That's a bold statement.

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Helmets improved so much you say? Ok, just exactly how have these hi tech devices "improved so much" and where are the data to support your assertion? I would love to see the data that shows helmets are now, quieter, more comfortable, and most of all, safer than they were 5, 10, or 15 years ago! confused.gif

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We're talking about a fifteen year-old helmet, right? Not a five or ten year old one? I could pretty much guarantee that anyone you ask will tell you that today's helmets are quieter, more comfortable and safer than a fifteen year old helmet. But don't take my word for it. Ask a reputable helmet manufacturer. From www.helmet.org : "Most manufacturers now recommend that helmets be replaced after five years, but some of that may be just marketing. Deterioration depends on usage, care, and abuse. But if you ride thousands of miles every year, five years may be a realistic estimate of helmet life. And helmets have actually been improving enough over time to make it a reasonable bet that you can find a better one than you did five years ago."

 

From Snell itself: "Why should you replace your helmet every five years?

The five year replacement recommendation is based on a consensus by both the helmet manufacturers and the Snell Foundation. Glues, resins and other materials used in helmet production over can affect liner materials. Hair oils, body fluids and cosmetics, as well as normal "wear and tear" all contribute to helmet degradation. Petroleum based products present in cleaners, paints, fuels and other commonly encountered materials may also degrade materials used in many helmets possibly degrading performance. Additionally, experience indicates there will be a noticeable improvement in the protective characteristic of helmets over a five year period due to advances in materials, designs, production methods and the standards. Thus, the recommendation for five year helmet replacement is a judgment call stemming from a prudent safety philosophy. "

 

I could have kept my comments to myself, but I hate it when people warn others to avoid manufacturers because of their personal dissatisfaction. That's it from me.

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Helmets improved so much you say? Ok, just exactly how have these hi tech devices "improved so much" and where are the data to support your assertion? I would love to see the data that shows helmets are now, quieter, more comfortable, and most of all, safer than they were 5, 10, or 15 years ago! confused.gif

 

First, any helmet older than 5 years no longer provides the same level of protection that it did when new. Ozone affects the styrene and renders it stiffer and less compressible. Since styrene is the "crushable" element in helmets, once it begins to stiffen, it loses its ability to absorb energy.

 

As to helmets being quieter, advances in aerodynamic design, as well as the way helmets seal around the ears and the neck (the largest source of noise comes in from around the sides and rear of the neck) have contributed greatly to quieter helmets. Additionally, most helmets these days have flush-mounted face shields, as opposed to face shields held on with side plates. The elimination of side plates has also helped reduce the amount of turbulence and noise.

 

More comfortable? Yes they are. Several manufacturers now offer helmets in different head shapes that mimic the general differences in head shapes found in the majority of people. This was not available 15 years ago. Arai leads in this endeavor, offering three distinctly shaped helmet interiors to match the three most common head shapes: round, oval and long oval. HJC, the world's #1 helmet brand, offers their CL line in round and their AC line in oval. And these manufacturers aren't the only ones.

 

Add to these head-shape advancements, the improvements that have been made in the open-cell foams and fabrics used in the helmet's comfort liners. Foams today are more resilient, retaining their shape longer. More and more helmets are coming with removable liners that allow them to be washed in order to remove accumulated skin oils, perpiration and dirt. The more resilient foams then return back to their original shape providing the cushioned comfort first available when the helmet was new. And the fabrics used on the comfort liner are now treated with anti-bacterial solutions and many come with perspiration-wicking properties that older helmets never had.

 

When it comes to safety, every five years the Snell Foundation reviews and upgrades its testing requirements to reflect the current state of technology in fiberglass, fiberglas/kevlar blends, and polycarbonates, the three main components from which helmet shells are made from. Additionally, as styrenes have improved, the Snell standards have risen to demand greater and greater protection, crushability, and multiple-impact resistance than ever before. A helmet meeting Snell 2005 standards is a safer helmet than one meeting Snell 2000, which is safer than Snell 1995, and so on.

 

If someone is riding with a Shoei RF200, I would estimate that helmet is probably about 25% as effective as when new, and probably no more than 10% as effective as a new, Snell 2005-approved helmet would be.

 

If someone doesn't want to spend the money for a new helmet, it's their call. But I can guarantee you of one thing. In the 3/10 of a second between "oh, shit" and impact, be it with another vehicle or with the ground, you don't EVER get a chance to call Time Out so you can go and get your good gear on. You live, or you die, based on the decisions you made before you got on your motorcycle. There are no "do-overs."

 

That has a different value to each of us. This isn't a judgment call. The only judgment I make is the one just before I swing a leg over my own bike. But since you asked for information, I thought I'd provide some.

 

As for Shoei's lousy customer service, I can assure you that Arai, HJC, and virtually any other brand out there will not have parts for helmets older than 5 years, unless those parts also happen to fit current models. They just don't want the legal liability of supporting the use of a helmet that old.

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Helmets improved so much you say? Ok, just exactly how have these hi tech devices "improved so much" and where are the data to support your assertion? I would love to see the data that shows helmets are now, quieter, more comfortable, and most of all, safer than they were 5, 10, or 15 years ago! confused.gif

 

 

Max, I gotta chime in here...

 

If I may make broad, sweeping statements in line with your style of blanket condemnations: ("Don't buy a Shoei Helmet!" -

 

 

You are speaking like someone who hasn't tried on a "21st Century" motorcycle helmet lately.

 

 

The previous posts do in fact offer data that CLAIMS helmets are "quieter, more comfortable and safer" than they were 15 years ago. The science (testing by Snell, DOT...) of the materials says so, too. The PROOF is - at least in my case - mostly empirical... my own observations about comfort and quite-ness, although I also have "crash-tested" my FR-900, and it saved my noggin when I needed saving! I do believe my X-11 is the best I've owned for comfort; it breathes a lot of air when it gets hot in SoCal, and FEELS better than my previous skidlids, going back many years. Quieter? Again, my ears say, "yes."

 

 

And regarding the loose screws (biting my tongue here...) - I bought a "spare parts kit" with my FR-900, and yes, I needed it. On the road, too, but I did have it. When I got home, I added a touch of silicone as a type of "Loc-Snug" and haven't had a problem since!

 

YMMV etc.

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maxfrankel

I see your point. I just hope BMW doesn't adopt your logic and decide to stop making parts for its older motorcycles whenever they come out with an improved, safer design. lmao.gif

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