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Linked brakes


Tonopah

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I'm new to the K12GT and BMW brakes. Mine is an '07 so no servo assisted. I am accustomed to using both the front and rear brakes to slow down -- you know, slow progressive squeeze on the front and some use of the rear at the same time. I understand that many BMW owners use the front brake only -- relying on that to activate both brakes.

 

Any reason why I can't stick to what I am used to -- using them both? Or is there an advantage to using only the front brake? Does using them both sort of defeat the linked brakes thing and possibly result in worse (less effective)braking than just using the front brake only?

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ShovelStrokeEd

Nope, to all your questions. Go right on doing what you had been doing. In fact, you may wish to reconsider your usage of the brakes a bit. The debate over whether BMW has optimized the braking linkage on their bikes has been presented here before. As I recall, the consensus is that they have not and the best method for most effective brake application is still to apply the rear brake first, shortly followed by strong application of the front brakes.

 

The reasoning is more or less as follows.

 

The rear brake will provide its most effective braking during the short period during which the bike has not fully transfered its weight to the front wheel. It follows then, that this brake should be applied first and then, as the loading on the front wheel increase traction on that end, the front brake is applied with increasing vigor up to the limits of that traction. Note that it may be necessary to modulate the pressure on the rear brake to avoid loss of traction on that wheel. Lots of words to describe the action but, a visual representation of the sound might be easier. "taDUMtaa.a..a,,,a" might be close.

 

Both my '01 Honda Blackbird, and my '00 Honda VFR are equipped with Honda's fully hydraulic version of a system called "LBS" that I really like. It is mechanically a bit complex but works a treat. 6 piston calipers on the front and a 4 piston on the rear. Rear pedal applies 3 of the pistons on the rear caliper and a single piston on the right front caliper via a pressure proportioning valve. Front lever applies the remaining pistons on the front caliper and the resulting torque on the left front caliper, which is mounted on a pivot, applies the remaining piston on the rear caliper. Lots of lines, valves and extra components but the system works with no extra maintenance other than the fact that a fluid flush/bleed is somewhat fiddly to perform with about 9 separate bleeders that must be done in a specific sequence. Still only takes about an hour though, so it isn't too bad.

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I'm new to them too, only on an '07 RT. Thanks all for the advice as I had the same question, and BMW's manual does not address the issue. I have been using both brakes, as seems to be the consensus, but had wondered if the rear brake foot control was really only there to allow for control and start-up when stopped on a grade.

 

Have about 400 miles on the bike now and practiced fast stops in a parking lot a couple of times. Coming from the cruiser world, I can only say, "WOW", love these brakes!!!!!!

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GoGo Gadget
but had wondered if the rear brake foot control was really only there to allow for control and start-up when stopped on a grade.

 

Have about 400 miles on the bike now and practiced fast stops in a parking lot a couple of times. Coming from the cruiser world, I can only say, "WOW", love these brakes!!!!!!

 

 

LOL, yeah there is a WORLD of difference between these brakes and the typical cruiser.

 

The rear brake pedal is there for more than starting on a grade. I actually use the front lever for that since I put my right foot down at stops, not my left. You will use the rear brake to stabilize the bike during slow speed maneuvers. Drag the rear brake while keeping the RPMs up for a tight U turn for example. Or if you want to scrub a little speed in a corner. A touch of rear brake will not upset the chassis as much as front brake. In a corner, rear brake settles the bike and lowers it a touch. Front brake tends to want to stand the bike up as the weight transfers forward and the CG goes up.

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