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My Gosh, it is heavy!


mefly2

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So, I got this nifty wheel chock from H-engineering. The front tire went in very easily, but then when I went to pull the RT out of the chock, it would not release. Try as I would, the wheel/tire would not come back out of the chock.

 

Eventually, I dismounted the RT and tried to pry the tire out from the side ... all the while holding on to the right side handle bar. Then, it happened - for whatever reason - the bike began to tip to the side and the wheel / tire released from the chock.

 

Being off to the side with only one hand on the bars is NOT the position to stop a zero speed fall over. Down the bike went! Fortunately for me, it was parked near the edge of the driveway; so, damage was minimized as part of the bike fell onto the grass ... scrapes and scars from the concrete, but the fairing is intact. But what a heartbreaker! I had no idea that the bike was this HEAVY! Any hints on saving the lower back if I sould dump the bike again while solo (yes, I know get an assist or a crane)? Am I really that wimpy ...

 

Luckily I tried the chock before moving the RT into the garage ... beware of the automatic chocks!

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wrestleantares
Ouch. Few things hurt more than seeing your bike laying on it's side. Try this link: How to lift a fallen motorcycle

 

And having other people standing around watching the whole debacle is one of them.

 

I can attest to the how to lift a motorcycle. I have no problem picking up my LT and I'm a 140 pound weakling.

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John Diakonis

I know what you mean.I have an S and it's heavy when you're trying to get it out of the chock. Now I stand in front of the bike with the side stand down and my foot on the edge of the chock to help it flip down. Still unnerving but it works. Also try to adjust how far the wheel goes into the chock. Some are adjustable making it easier to roll it out.

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Steve_Witmer

Tips for saving your back . . .

 

Once the bike is on it's way down, don't try to stop it -- you'll only hurt yourself.

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I feel your pain man.

 

There are many bikes that heavy, and let me tell you my Road Glide is something over 250 pounds heavier than that!

 

I had to hook up a rope pulley and a car bumper once to get mine back on its wheels. Plenty embarrassing for sure. blush.gif

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Knifemaker

Not only your back...I got the worst hamsting pull ever trying to save a R1150R fully loaded for a 2 week trip.

Stayed at Deals Gap station for 4 hours with an ice pack before I could even stand up on the bad leg. Riding down "The Dragon" with a badly pulled hamstring and continuing riding for 2 weeks is NO fun.

 

BE SAFE

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Little_Brit

I stained my groin failing to stop a heavily loaded, two up R75/6 from falling. Front tyre rode over a wet garage forecourt threshold kerb stone the back just zipped along it leaving me with a speedway style position, not good when you're vertically challenged and only 11 stone(alright 154 lbs if you must!). That bike had it in for me, it also did a good job of buggering up the tendons in my left forearm with its bullworker clutch pull. The GS clutch is about my limit these days.

 

Derek Brown

 

R1200GS

R850r (gone but not forgotten)

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I put the fully loaded up bike on its sidestand and it just kept leaning and leaning. Nope it didn't go all the way over, but I couldn't get it back upright while straddling it. I didn't know what to do: a) wait for someone to come by to help. b) unload everything, find a level parking spot and reload. c) get off the bike and try to get it upright and jump onboard before it goes over on the other side. d) ride it off the sidestand.

 

My solution was to sit on the bike to compress the suspension and gain a little leverage. It worked that time.

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Thanks for the link and all who shared their experiences ... devastating; I'm sure! I did use the back to the bike technique, but it was a challenge for my 160 lbs to get it up solo. Today, I'll assess the damages more closely ... I didn't even look at the bike all of yesterday.

Ride safely ... thumbsup.gif

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I wish I had seen that link on raising a bike, I will certainly keep that one in the memory bank (such as it is). I dropped mine in front of a restaruant that I frequent. The side stand evidentially wasn't down all the way and it just went over with me scrambling to get off and out of the way.

 

As one of the earlier posters commented, no body offered to help raise the bike. The on lookers just commented as I went into the restaruant, "What Happened" Daaa. dopeslap.gif

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As a fulltime RVer, I carry the bike on the back of the motorhome. I used to have a Pingel chock on my lift and that was pretty easy on and off. Then I got one of the automatic kind like you describe so I could do the whole process by myself - easy on, but no way I could lift it enough while sitting on it to get it out of the chock. Luckily in RV parks where I stay, there's always someone walking around to ask for a push! And I'm not too proud to ask. crazy.gif

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OK, I'm a klutz ... never had any problems with the R80RT ... but then, never had a chock before either! Update - tonight I tipped it ever so slightly going into the chock; fortunately for the bike, it didn't go down too far. Unfortunately for the 325 convertible next to it ... there is now a $200 dent in the side of the car. But ... I'm still learning; right? Krapola !!!

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That is the primary reason there is an F800ST in my garage right now. My Honda ST1300 needed three longshoremen and a block and tackle to get it back on its feet when it went over. I suspect your bike is about the same weight (750-800 lbs). Really heavy when they're down (and yes, I've seen Suzi lift hers -- my male ego is shattered).

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Come on guys, I know it's not a real easy thing to do, but you should be able to do this without serious effort. Just put your butt against the seat, grab the lowest grip with one hand, frame rail or alike with the other and just walk it up with your legs. Works for me, saves my back as well. BTW, I'm 40 and not in anyway ready for the Mr. Olympia contest!

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I dropped mine in front of a restaruant that I frequent. The side stand evidentially wasn't down all the way and it just went over with me scrambling to get off and out of the way.

 

That's one reason I dismount on the right-hand side ... so that I'm out of the way if my bike goes over.

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That's one reason I dismount on the right-hand side ... so that I'm out of the way if my bike goes over.

Try as I might, I can't picture how you can dismount on the right side if the bike is leaning to the left on the kickstand. Or am I missing something?

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Try as I might, I can't picture how you can dismount on the right side if the bike is leaning to the left on the kickstand. Or am I missing something?

 

No, I don't think you're missing anything. Give it a try. ;-)

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I put the fully loaded up bike on its sidestand and it just kept leaning and leaning. Nope it didn't go all the way over, but I couldn't get it back upright while straddling it. I didn't know what to do: a) wait for someone to come by to help. b) unload everything, find a level parking spot and reload. c) get off the bike and try to get it upright and jump onboard before it goes over on the other side. d) ride it off the sidestand.

 

I have found that it can be a little easier for me to lift my bike off its sidestand while I'm straddling it if I have the front wheel turned all the way to the right. YMMV.

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