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One more thing to be paranoid about?


DavidEBSmith

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DavidEBSmith

So there I was riding along at a sedate pace when I hit something with a loud THWAPP!! and a couple of shakes of the front wheel. First thought was that the shiny new Avon tire I had just installed had blown out.

 

So I pulled into a parking lot, thinking that it didn't feel like the front tire was blown out. I got off the bike and immediately knew what the problem was.

 

Three of the four bolts holding on the front fender had fallen out. Apparently the fender caught on the tire, spun, and was now behind the front wheel, wedged under the black rear fender.

 

Apparently the THWAPP!! and wiggle was as I ran over my own front fender.

 

A couple of zip ties from the magic parts bag and a screw from the fairing and the remains of the front fender were back in place. Considering I ran it over, it's not too bad - there's a chunk missing on the lower edge and a few new scratches on the front, but you might not even notice.

 

Apparently I have some issue with getting the front fender secure after changing the front tire. I had the same thing happen on the first day of the 2005 IBR, except that the fender didn't get caught under the tire, it just bounced on top of the tire and caused a weird wobble. (And that experience is how I knew to re-attach the front fender with some zip ties).

 

It's weird that those long bolts at the top of the fender could back themselves out, considering how much turning it takes to screw them in and out. It's also weird because I wasn't more than 30 miles down the road from the Full Moon, where a whole bunch of people were looking at my bike and I would think somebody would have noticed 2-inch long bolts hanging out.

 

I'm wondering if I managed to not get the long bolts into the clips on the black inner fender that hold them on, so the bolts were just being held in place by friction. I also have to wonder about the anti-seize I had put on those bolts to keep them from seizing in the aluminum fork legs like they did once before.

 

Just glad it didn't happen heeled over in a turn in Utah. I can't think that the top of an RT fender provides good traction. crazy.gif

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Paul Mihalka

The main reason I had a K1200RS front fender on my R1100RT was that I don't have to take it off to take the wheel off. Other reasons: Strap type Motolights fit without modifying the fender and I liked the looks.

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Also, try the 2x6 under the center stand trick.Lifts the bike up enough that fender's not in the way anymore!

Makes front tire changes much simpler.

 

wave.gif

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Parrothead

Had the same thing happen to my 96RT. Only difference is the mechanic who did the tire change did not tighten the the four screws. Only took about two months before they worked out and the fender came down. I was traveling on I-15, doing about 70 MPH when I heard a high-pitched whine. Took lots of skin from the inside of the fender, but no outer damage. The sound put the fear of god in me for sure. "NOT" the mechanics fault...........yeah right!

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I believe those either have slugs in the screws or they put loctite on them at the factory.

 

The 2 bolts on the top of my fender needed to be drilled out. The replacements had a slug in them, but the old ones did not.

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QUOTE

Three of the four bolts holding on the front fender had fallen out. Apparently the fender caught on the tire, spun, and was now behind the front wheel, wedged under the black rear fender.

Apparently the THWAPP!! and wiggle was as I ran over my own front fender. tongue.gif

 

When you ride enough miles, lots of strange things have time to happen! grin.gif

 

Find a different way to check your shocks, will ya??

 

I'm going to check my front fender.

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A Slug????

 

A slug is a plastic pellet that is pressed into a machined slot on a screw. The same idea as a nylon lock nut.

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Joe Frickin' Friday

Thanks a lot, Eebie. Because of you, I've already got enough to worry about. I can't get the image of your swingarm out of my head - the picture taken after your grenaded driveshaft almost shattered said swingarm into two pieces...

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So there I was riding along at a sedate pace when I hit something with a loud THWAPP!! and a couple of shakes of the front wheel. First thought was that the shiny new Avon tire I had just installed had blown out.

 

So I pulled into a parking lot, thinking that it didn't feel like the front tire was blown out. I got off the bike and immediately knew what the problem was.

 

Three of the four bolts holding on the front fender had fallen out. Apparently the fender caught on the tire, spun, and was now behind the front wheel, wedged under the black rear fender.

 

Apparently the THWAPP!! and wiggle was as I ran over my own front fender.

 

A couple of zip ties from the magic parts bag and a screw from the fairing and the remains of the front fender were back in place. Considering I ran it over, it's not too bad - there's a chunk missing on the lower edge and a few new scratches on the front, but you might not even notice.

 

Apparently I have some issue with getting the front fender secure after changing the front tire. I had the same thing happen on the first day of the 2005 IBR, except that the fender didn't get caught under the tire, it just bounced on top of the tire and caused a weird wobble. (And that experience is how I knew to re-attach the front fender with some zip ties).

 

It's weird that those long bolts at the top of the fender could back themselves out, considering how much turning it takes to screw them in and out. It's also weird because I wasn't more than 30 miles down the road from the Full Moon, where a whole bunch of people were looking at my bike and I would think somebody would have noticed 2-inch long bolts hanging out.

 

I'm wondering if I managed to not get the long bolts into the clips on the black inner fender that hold them on, so the bolts were just being held in place by friction. I also have to wonder about the anti-seize I had put on those bolts to keep them from seizing in the aluminum fork legs like they did once before.

 

Just glad it didn't happen heeled over in a turn in Utah. I can't think that the top of an RT fender provides good traction. crazy.gif

 

Because those bolts go through plastic so can’t be tightened to a decent clamping load I always use a little Lock-Tite on them when reinstalling.. Actually makes removing them easier (once broken free) as the Loc-Tite seals out moisture so they don’t corrode in place.

 

Twisty

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DavidEBSmith

Because those bolts go through plastic so can’t be tightened to a decent clamping load I always use a little Lock-Tite on them when reinstalling.. Actually makes removing them easier (once broken free) as the Loc-Tite seals out moisture so they don’t corrode in place.

 

The upper ones go into clips on the black plastic fender, not a threaded hole, so I'm not sure how well Loctite would work on them. The lower ones, I've already had to drill out and Heli-Coil one screw that froze in the fork leg.

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If you use loctite, choose the correct grade.

Because this is in plastic, apply loctite to screwthread and allow it to dry before installing. This then acts like a 'stiffnut'. I think you will find this a better proceedure.

Andy

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Because those bolts go through plastic so can’t be tightened to a decent clamping load I always use a little Lock-Tite on them when reinstalling.. Actually makes removing them easier (once broken free) as the Loc-Tite seals out moisture so they don’t corrode in place.

 

The upper ones go into clips on the black plastic fender, not a threaded hole, so I'm not sure how well Loctite would work on them. The lower ones, I've already had to drill out and Heli-Coil one screw that froze in the fork leg.

 

David, the Loc-Tite will work very well on the bolt to clip (J-nut) interface.. Obviously the more thread engagement the better it will hold but you are not looking at a high torsional load on those bolts just need a little protection from vibration back off..

 

As far as drilling the bolts out? Loc-Tite probably would have prevented that (unless they were cross threaded to begin with).. Loc-Tite gets a bad reputation because so many people use the incorrect product for the job or use the product incorrectly.. If you use the correct grade of Loc-Tite it will not only prevent vibration back out but will also seal any water or corrosion out of the bolt to hole/nut interface joint so the bolt CAN be removed at a later time.. The secret is in using the correct Loc-Tite product..

 

Twisty

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If you use loctite, choose the correct grade.

Because this is in plastic, apply loctite to screwthread and allow it to dry before installing. This then acts like a 'stiffnut'. I think you will find this a better proceedure.

Andy

 

Andy, Loc-Tite doesn’t work that way.. It isn’t like the material used on a Nylock nut or Nylock bolt.. The more common types of (service removable) Loc-Tite such as the blue 242 or high strength 272 are designed to crumble into a power upon removal (or insertion if already set up or dried).. That very trait is what makes the service removable Loc-Tite allow future removal of the fastener without twisting it off..

 

There are products out there that can be used as a dry insertion locker after an apply & drying but those are specialty products & most either require heat or chemical to produce the desired plastic like thread locker similar to the Nylock type..

 

Twisty

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buckeye nuts

Funny you posted this , i just replaced tires last week and noticed yesterday i already lost one top fender bolt. Ialso cant imagine a bolt that long backing out? Just need to make sure my bag of plastic ties are full, or just put them in the fender now to save time,

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This happened to me when I first bought the bike, about two or three days after I had a local dealer "check it over" (thanks, BMW of ######). I was doing about 80MPH on I15 South in San Diego, just hit the peak of the toll road over pass (i.e. a high speed curve). Two of the four bolts were gone, and the other two acted as a pivot point. The fender wrapped around to the bottom of the tire, and I immediately lost both stability and a bunch of the bikes manuvering capability. About half the fender was shreaded, and the fender acted like a "shoe" on the tire. First thing I thought was "Damn.. those #@$@$# "flat-proof" LEO tires are worthless ..."; I thought the front had blown out. I backed off the throttle, got off safely, and kissed the ground. I'd been riding again for about 10 days. "Welcome back, kid".

 

I found out that BMW has modified those bolts at some point. The newer version has a splint in them, which as I recall, either results in a tighter fit, or is used to apply a locking compound.

 

From that point on, I've used a touch of Locktite blue on those bolts. It only takes one little accident like this .. eek.gif

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Working as an aircraft instrumentation mechanic I once attended a class given by Loctite tight. It works by filling in the air space left between the threads. I mostly use the blue, holds well and parts easier to remove. There are a lot of different types. In red several, including weld sealer. So use the right kind. You might want to check out their web sight.

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