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Helmet warning sticker


Albion

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I've got neat-looking stickers on my helmet that warn: "Do not remove helmet without medical supervision unless rider unable to breathe".

 

Seems like solid advice to offer anyone non-medical who is trying to help in an emergency, as the idea of piloting a wheelchair is not very appealing.

 

Just bought a new helmet for my wife (her birthday present actually, she's still p*ssed that it wasn't perfume, but hey ho) and it seems a good idea to put a couple of stickers on this helmet too.

 

Can't seem to find any for sale in the UK, any known sources elsewhere?

 

Your advice will be appreciated.

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Not worth the bother. No one will pay any attention to the sticker. They will just remove the helmet anyway, thinking they are doing you a favour.

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You might try the American Motorcycle Association (AMA). Seems to me they're the ones to have all that kind of thing at the MC shows here. I just sent them an email asking about them......will let you know what I get back.

 

Pat

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Aluminum_Butt

They're available HERE.

 

Cycle Gadgets has them HERE. It's the same item as the meds.org label, but has the Cycle Gadgets logo on it. CG does not specifically say that their product warns to not remove the helmet, and the pictures are too small to tell for sure. Might want to ask them to make sure.

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Would anyone really notice? I put a stiker on my buddy's helemt at work (on the back) that said, "Harley's Suck". He rode with it for a month until one of his fellow HOG riders finally asked what the heck he had that on his helmet for.... thumbsup.gif I denied all knowlegde.

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Would anyone really notice? I put a stiker on my buddy's helemt at work (on the back) that said, "Harley's Suck". He rode with it for a month until one of his fellow HOG riders finally asked what the heck he had that on his helmet for.... thumbsup.gif I denied all knowlegde.

 

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

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Ever since my first track day event, years ago, I have had the same 3 stickers on mine and my wife's helmet.

 

 

DO NOT REMOVE

 

TYPE A POSITIVE

 

NO ALLERGIES

 

 

I make them up myself using florescent tape in my 'Brother P-Touch' label maker and have had a number of people ask me:

a) Why do you have that, do you have a death wish, or plan on having an accident?

b) Where did you get them...

 

I would never NOT have them because I thought someone MIGHT NOT see them. They just might too...

 

Jim

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I love this one

 

3466.jpg

 

Seriously...anyone know why they do not cut a helmet off? It would seem to me to be easier/safer to split the helmet and open it up with less risk than pulling it over your ears.

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I love this one

 

3466.jpg

 

Seriously...anyone know why they do not cut a helmet off? It would seem to me to be easier/safer to split the helmet and open it up with less risk than pulling it over your ears.

 

Just a guess but the movement of cutting a helmet can't be any better than careful removal of a helmet.

 

Maybe the cruiser riders have it right with the half helmet. Easier and safer to remove.

 

Then again, they probably need more help than a full faced helmet person does! dopeslap.gif

 

Jim cool.gif

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Seems like solid advice to offer anyone non-medical who is trying to help in an emergency, as the idea of piloting a wheelchair is not very appealing.

 

Interestingly on my last Red Cross First Aid refresher course they have changed their policy and now recommend helmet removal. The rationale behind the change is that more riders were dying from blocked airways and other problems inside helmets that had been left on 'for safety's sake' than are damaged by their removal. The paramedic tutor said they were encountering a lot of resistance to the practice from members of the public at accidents. Of course one could argue that a first-aid trained person my be more skilled at safe helemt removal but it does raise an interesting point.

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Interesting. Once again, conventional wisdom seems suspect.

 

A quick google produces Red Cross info http://www.redcross.org.uk/standard.asp?id=48904&cachefixer=

 

Another gives http://www.nabd.org.uk/openhouse/openhouse47/47p6.htm

 

St Johns quoted as: "Casualties wearing helmets:

 

A full-faced helmet should only be removed if the injured rider does not have a clear airway and cannot breathe. In all other circumstances the helmet should remain in place unless the rider chooses to remove it him/herself. In the situation where a casualty requires expired air resuscitation and is wearing a full-faced helmet, the helmet must be removed by at least two people.

 

The first person must ensure that the head and neck are completely stabilised and supported to avoid any further damage. The second person must carefully remove the helmet in a way that minimises all movement to the head and neck.

 

Once the helmet has been removed, the first aiders can perform expired air resuscitation."

 

Which says that the whole topic is immensely more complicated than I had understood.

 

So in reality, as a crashed and maybe conscious rider, you are completely at the mercy of anyone first on the scene, and any generalised advice is likely to be wrong. But maybe the wording on the old sticker that I have, if anyone bothers to read it in the heat of the moment, is not all bad. (See my original post that sparked this thread).

 

Full face helmet? Maybe I'd get a get-out-of-jail-free card with my flip front helmet, if any non-motorcyclist could work out how to get the catch open!

 

I may be wiser investing in a St Christopher sticker!!!

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