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Winterize?


Nomad

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It's getting a little chilly up here in Michigan. I can't find any clear reference to preparations to cold store my 2006 R1200RT. Truthfully, I've only looked at the owner's manual. No help. Any suggestions? Thanks...Rick

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I would imagine standard winterizing procedures would be appropriate...

 

There are lots of sites out there with different levels of complexity. For long-term storage (> 2 mos), I would:

 

- Put STA-BIL in the gas tank and run the bike for a few miles

- Change the oil

- Remove the battery and hook it up to a battery tender

- Spray fogging oil into the cylinders through a spark plug hole

- Set tire pressure (check/adjust monthly while bike is stored)

- Put the bike on the centerstand and lift the front wheel off the ground (to prevent tire deformation)

- Wax everything painted

- Cover the bike

 

If you have any weather sensitive farkles, or anything electronic/expensive, I would remove them and store them in a heated area. Also store the battery in a heated area.

 

There are certainly other good ideas too -- you can google for motorcycle winterizing to see a lot of info.

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I would imagine standard winterizing procedures would be appropriate...

 

There are lots of sites out there with different levels of complexity. For long-term storage (> 2 mos), I would:

 

- Put STA-BIL in the gas tank and run the bike for a few miles

- Change the oil

- Remove the battery and hook it up to a battery tender

- Spray fogging oil into the cylinders through a spark plug hole

- Set tire pressure (check/adjust monthly while bike is stored)

- Put the bike on the centerstand and lift the front wheel off the ground (to prevent tire deformation)

- Wax everything painted

- Cover the bike

 

If you have any weather sensitive farkles, or anything electronic/expensive, I would remove them and store them in a heated area. Also store the battery in a heated area.

 

There are certainly other good ideas too -- you can google for motorcycle winterizing to see a lot of info.

 

I think this is a pretty good list, but I'd add that it's probably a good idea to top up the gas tank, which will minimize condensation. It's about as far as I go, but if you ride frequently in rain, or if your bike will be in a humid storage facility, it's not a bad idea to hit items subject to corrosion with some WD-40. I typically spray some into/around the exposed switchgear, though electrical contact cleaner might be a better choice for that particular chore.

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The switchgear is susceptible to corrosion???

 

Probably no more so than other marques. It's something you read about occasionally, and a shot of WD-40 always struck me as cheap insurance.

 

Of course, there's no denying the placebo effect.

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It's getting a little chilly up here in Michigan. I can't find any clear reference to preparations to cold store my 2006 R1200RT. Truthfully, I've only looked at the owner's manual. No help. Any suggestions? Thanks...Rick

 

I winterized mine yesterday. Parked it in the garage, cleaned off the bugs, put her on the centerstand, and checked the oil for next weekends ride, and the next, and the next, and the next.... grin.gif

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It's getting a little chilly up here in Michigan.

 

Are the streets dry? Then it's riding weather. grin.gifthumbsup.gif

 

If all else fails, see www.gerbings.com

They are here, so yes I'm still riding. I wish there was a way to turn off the flashing snow flake though. Yes I know it's cold, quit reminding me. :-) -2C (28F)this morning. I'm warmer on the bike than I am in the bloody van, with my heated: gloves, vest, grips and seat all turned on! Toasty warm. wave.gif

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..... Also store the battery in a heated area.

I'm not sure about a Gel battery, or the validity of this claim, but I've been told to make sure that you keep it off the cement floor too. Apparently it speeds up the discharge.

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..... Also store the battery in a heated area.

...make sure that you keep it off the cement floor too. Apparently it speeds up the discharge.

 

I think the real issue is to keep the battery clean -- particularly between the terminals -- to avoid discharging.

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..... Also store the battery in a heated area.

I'm not sure about a Gel battery, or the validity of this claim, but I've been told to make sure that you keep it off the cement floor too. Apparently it speeds up the discharge.

14.1. MYTH: Storing batteries on a concrete floor will discharge them.

 

False! All lead-acid batteries will naturally self-discharge which can result in loss of capacity from sulfation. The rate of self-discharge is most influenced by the temperature of the battery's electrolyte and the chemistry of the plates. This self-discharge is often mistaken for concrete floor causing the battery to drain. Some experts believe that storing car or deep cycle batteries on a colder concrete floor might actually slow down the self-discharge (leakage) rate because the floor acts as a heat sink and cools the battery. (Please see Section 13 for more information on storing batteries and Section 1 for more information on sulfation.

 

In the early 1900s, when battery cases were made of porous materials such as tar-lined wood boxes, storing batteries on concrete floor would accelerate their natural self-discharge due to external leakage. Modern battery cases are made of polypropylene or hard rubber. These cases are sealed better, so external leakage-causing discharge is no longer a problem, provided the top of the battery is clean and free from wet or dried electrolyte and the same temperature as the floor.

 

Large differences in temperature could cause electrolyte stratification within very large batteries (>250 AH) which could accelerate it's internal "leakage" or self-discharge if the battery is sitting on an extremely cold concrete, stone or steel floor in a warm room, boat or submarine. Stirrers or bubblers are often used on these types of large batteries to keep the electrolyte from stratifying. Undercharging will also cause electrolyte stratification, which can also result in loss of capacity from sulfation.

 

From:

Battery FAQs

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I actually prefer to ride in the fall and winter. Even though the dense air is harsh. If you keep riding you just need to keep a close watch on you tire pressures. They seem to drop alot in the cold weather.

If you park your bike for the winter, make sure to park it with a vapor barrier under it. Moisture can migrate through the concrete and rot your wheels and undercarrage. I use either a piece of 40lb roofing felt or a piece of house wrap. Depending on what I have laying around. As for the battery, I have never used a trickle charger, and never had a problem. Except my Harley, and it just shook them poor suckers to death. grin.gif JP

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