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Switching Uneven lanes


wbrissette

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Here's a question for people. What technique do you use to switch lanes when there are uneven lanes? Usually this is when they are getting ready to repave the road, so they tear up one side, lay down new asphalt, then you have a couple of inch lip between lanes. If you're riding on the higher part, it's easy to drop down to the lower lane. However, when you're in the lower lane it's very uncomfortable switching to the higher lane.

 

To make matters worse, how would you do it with two-up riding?

 

I ended up turning at an intersection, turning around, so I could hit this head on. I also noticed that they left the intersection fairly even which helped.

 

Wayne

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Just do it fast, that is change lanes very positively, which increases the angle you hit it at. As long as you are being positive, forceful even, in your lane change you will scarcely feel it. If you approach the transition tentatively or timidly, you will meet it at a shallow angle and there is more danger of getting edge-trapped.

 

Andy

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However, when you're in the lower lane it's very uncomfortable switching to the higher lane.

It only looks that way (at least here in CA it does). There's been only a handful of opportunities for me to "climb the lip", and each time the moto just rode right up with no problem at all. Again, this is a CA experience, and your lip height may vary. grin.gif

 

Something worth noting: some guy on a HD died near Verdi on I-80 on his way to this year's Street Vibrations and on one of the local evening TV news progs there was a mention of uneven pavement as possibly being a contributing factor due to road construction in the area, but no further details were given and there was no mention of uneven pavement in any other reports.

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Rocket_Cowboy
Just do it fast, that is change lanes very positively, which increases the angle you hit it at. As long as you are being positive, forceful even, in your lane change you will scarcely feel it. If you approach the transition tentatively or timidly, you will meet it at a shallow angle and there is more danger of getting edge-trapped.

 

I agree with Andy. I try to increase the angle that I take the pavement change, such that I'm not just trying to slip up on it, but rather ride over it. Makes all the different to me.

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ShovelStrokeEd

I really don't treat it any differently than a normal (for me) lane change. I tend to make positive moves, after indicating of course, and that minimizes the reaction,if any.

 

You are riding a motorcycle, not piloting a cruise ship. Turn the damn thing into the other lane, recover and continue on your way. Two up won't matter a bit if you follow the foregoing.

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These are often refered to as "edge traps" and they CAN be dangerous-er than the average bear IF you siddle up real gentle to them.

 

Like everybody says, decide to transition, develop as much angle as you can (normal not tangential) and do it.

 

wave.gif

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Just to be really clear...

 

Move over to the side of your current lane, as far as possible from the lip, make sure it is clear behind you in the new lane, and that nobody else is in a position to change into that lane either. Then make a very positive move turning toward the new lane. As soon as you bump up onto the new lane be prepared to straighten out so that you don't keep going across into the next lane (if there is one). The slower you are going, the easier it is to develop a high angle with the edge. But don't slow down so much that you have to worry about traffic coming up from behind.

 

As others have said, it really isn't a problem unless you come up to the edge a a very shallow angle.

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To add a little bit from the 2-up perspective, it's really no different, it's just a very "purposeful" movement toward the bump up. But like all quick, sudden things, I always try to warn Donna whenever possible with a quick, "LANE CHANGE!" (or whatever) on the intercom before I do these type of maneuvers.

 

It's either that or get a slap up the side of the helmet two seconds after the fact! tongue.gif Some times figuratively, some times literally!

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Several years ago I was in the front of a 4 bike group (all 2 up) when we found ourselves on the DC beltway amid weekend traffic (50 - 70 mph of disorganized mayhem). To add a little spice to the brief section we had to traverse, we came upon a section of construction. We were in one of the middle lanes and I was excercising extreme awareness to the traffic around us. As we motored along I looked to my left and noticed we were in a milled lane and the lane to our left had been repaved. The resulting "curb" was 5 to 6 inches above our lane and virtually vertical (yes the lane was open and in use). If we had been forced to move to that lane it would have required essentially stopping. Fortunately we exited (to our right) after several exits. It's by far the worst I've seen and no technique, short of straight on, would have saved a go down.

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The resulting "curb" was 5 to 6 inches above our lane and virtually vertical (yes the lane was open and in use).

Someone needs to speak to the local DOT about that practice, lest they find out one day that they've become defendants in a courtroom...

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Per David Hugh; Best attacked at 45deg, no less then 30deg.

 

Since edge traps can be tricky at best, and appear without warning. I am aggressive on all my lane changes.

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ShovelStrokeEd

It's by far the worst I've seen and no technique, short of straight on, would have saved a go down.

 

Ummmm, probably not. You would be amazed at what your bike is capable of climbing over. If you happen to have one lying around, take a common brick and slide it up against your wheel and see how little of the circumference it really takes up. I good sharp swerve from the far side of your lane, straightening up in the new direction and momentum will carry the day. Another sharp swerve to recover your original direction and Bob's your uncle. The bars may give a pretty good twitch but the actual event will be short enough that the bike won't even get very upset.

 

It is even easier with the 19" front wheels on the GS Adv type bikes and even easier with a 21. Now, if the edge is truely sharp and you are a proponent of low tire pressures, you might just dent a rim in the process but the bike will do just fine. It could even be argued that 2-up might provide a better weight distribution, slightly unloading the front end, for this particular situation.

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