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Removing R1100RT front mudguard


Ian

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I want to remove the front painted mudguard on my year 2000 R1100RT. The two side socket head screws are turning but the sensation I get is that horrible feeling when a screw is about to snap!

 

Has anyone else experienced a problem getting this mudguard off?

Ian

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Should come right out. There are 4 screws though, 2 up top on the sides, and 2 down low on the sides. Different cap head sizes too on my 99.

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If someone sometime in the past had overtightened them it's possible they are stripped, thus not backing out, but it would be unlikely you'd be able to snap them off.

 

Of course if you do, I never said any of this! wink.gif

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I had exactly the same problem when I recently changed my fork seals. The left bottom screw wouldn't budge. I had to drill the head off in order to remove the mudguard. Use a sharp drill because if you get the screw too hot with a blunt drill you will melt the plastic of the mudguard. I then used a pair of vice grips on the stub of the screw which remained. Even this would not release the screw. Next I used a fine blowtorch on the stub to get it really hot. You need to be really careful not to get heat onto the ABS wiring and components. Anyway the combination of heat and vice grips did the job.

 

I re-assembled with a new screw with some anti seize compound (but don't overdo the compound as you don't want any to get on the brake rotors.

 

Good luck

 

Cabbage

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DavidEBSmith

If you're talking about the upper screw (the larger one, #5), that goes into a clip (#7) on the black part of the mudguard. It may be that the clip is turning or is messed up, or that the clip is displaced or missing and the screw isn't even going into it. Feel around behind the mudguard and see what you can find.

 

If you're talking about the lower (smaller) screw (#2), it's probably seized and about to snap. It seems to be real prone to seizing. The good news is that if does snap it off, it's relatively easy (once you get the broken screw out) to put a Heli-Coil in there.

717792-mudguard.gif

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Clive Liddell

Once you have removed your mudguard you may like to consider what I have to make this little chore much easier. I used to struggle to get the top screws started.

 

I have made two 6mm thread studs of appropriate length (by cutting off the heads of longer screws) which are then screwed in and locked in position with a narrow nut. It is simplicity itself to line up the mudguard, bend it slightly outwards to accept the stud(s), washers on, and then tighten up the nuts - I use stainless steel capnuts mainly for looks. You need a fairly thin walled 10mm socket for easy access to the nuts.

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David,

 

Its the lower pair. I am wondering what kind of release fluid might be good for these steel/aluminium joint threads? Reminds me of my friend who has an R1100S and decided to replace loads of original screws with stainless steel ones. Then heads of the SS screws holding the front alternator belt cover started breaking off after two years. Same thing with the SS cyl head guards.

 

Ian

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Eckhard Grohe

Stainless steel and aluminium is not a recommended combination especially if there may be salt involved. Some types of stainless are better than others but generally don't replace the regular steel screws with stainless in aluminium in a road going application. You could have the stainless plated with zinc but that would leave you without the BLING .

 

In addition stainless is generally not that strong so if strength counts forget stainless.

 

Mother nature is a hard mistress!

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Joe Frickin' Friday
In addition stainless is generally not that strong so if strength counts forget stainless.

 

Strength can vary widely, but I've seen SS bolts with strength comparable to SAE grade 5 (metric prop class 5.8), which ain't bad. If strength is an issue, I wouldn't automatically say forget stainless, but I would say run the numbers and make sure it'll work.

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Eckhard Grohe

The problem with running the numbers is that it is impossible to know what the load assumptions were by the BMW engineers when they spec'd the bolt the BLING artists are replacing.

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Cabbage,

 

Did you use a 6mm drill?

 

Ian

 

 

 

Yes Ian. A 6mm bit, I had to move the drill about carefully to widen the circle of cut, making sure I didn't touch the plastic, until I could feel the head was weakening and was held on by the smallest amount of metal. I gently moved the mudguard back and forth until the head broke off.

 

FWIW I replaced the broken screw with a stainless item but I made sure I applied copper anti sieze. I will check it is not seizing from time to time or when I carry out a service.

 

Cabbage

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