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Replacing a GPS V


pametz

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I am ready to move on from my trusty GPS V that I bought a few years ago and frankly am a bit confused over the newer models and the various choices. I would appreciate any thoughts and direction the collective wisdom might have.

 

I move the GPS between my motorcycle, my car and rental cars when I am out of town. Therefore weight and size becomes a consideration.

 

Frustrations with the V include speed of recalc and load, small B/W display and memory size.

 

Elements that would seem important in a new unit would include:

 

Range of information available on the V (beyond maps) such as avg speed, sunset, etc.

 

Backlit for night/good quality daylight readable display

 

Ability to create routes and waypoints on my laptop and upload to the GPS.

 

Waterproof!

 

Voice is an interesting option, but I am flexible.

 

Unclear on how the touchscreen will work with gloves.

 

Battery power and well as 12v power would be helpful. Same 12V connection (and antenna connection) as the V would be a plus.

 

Any guidance or suggestions would be appreciated!

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Take a look at the Garmin 276C. It would meet all of your wishes except that the power plug is different than the one used by your GPS V, because the same plug is used for audio out. Since it is designed to be used in a marine enviroment, it is waterproof and it has a relatively large screen that is easy to read in sunlight, though no touch screen. It has a removable rechargable battery that will power it all day. (I rarely bother with the power cord, choosing instead to recharge the battery at night.)

 

The are more expensive versions of the x76 line, which can receive real time weather information and display it on the screen. Very cool, but the monthly subscription for the weather service pretty expensive.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Brian

R12RT

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If you like the GPS V form factor then the Quest 2 is probably ideal for you and you'll find it a night-and-day improvement in just about every respect. The only real downside is the smallish screen (at least relative to a 'full size' road GPS) but the Quest's higher resoulution and color display will still be a significant improvement over the GPS V.

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Bill Murray

I concur with the other recommendations -- look at the Garmin Quest/Quest2 or the 276. Like you, I previously used a GPS V, when I was riding a K12GT, I also grew frustrated with the slow recalculation speed and found the monochrome screen difficult to read at times. After looking at both the Quest, Quest2, and 276C, I concluded the Quest was the best value for the money. Prior to selecting the Quest, I was strongly leaning toward the 276C (I especially liked the idea of the larger screen, and the 276C screen is suppoed to be one of the brightest available). Because I planned to use a RAM mount attached to one of my mirrors, the Quest screen size was more than adequate.

 

My riding buddy has also purchased a Quest for his R12RT and mounted it above the instrument panel using a Motorrad Concepts mount. If that is your mounting location on your RT, you may find the larger screen size of the 276C more appealing.

 

I can recommend purchasing from The GPS Store, especially since they were located only 40 miles or so from where I live. Their prices are very good, and I believe they are one of the larger mail-order and online sellers in the U.S. of GPS units. My Quest was a remanufactured unit, with full 1-year factory warranty, for $299. Their web site indicates they still have some of those units available.

 

Good luck. Drop a PM if you need forther information.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
Take a look at the Garmin 276C.

 

Two years gone by now, and I have no regrets about replacing my GPS V with a 276C. It's everything the V isn't: big bright color screen, fast display driver for jerk-free pan/zoom, fast processor for route recalcs, lots of memory (256 MB will hold detail maps for ridiculously long trips), voice output if you want it. Still has all the data available that the V has: altitude, sunrise/set, max speed, all that stuff.

 

Whatever mount setup you get for your bike...make sure you also get the beanbag mount, and then you can take it with you in any car.

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Stan Walker

(256 MB will hold detail maps for ridiculously long trips)

 

And the now available 512 MB card will hold twice as much in your 276C. Plus latest two versions of this same great GPS design come with enough internal memory to hold the entire US.

 

Stan

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Okay,I changed my mind. Again. Popped for the 276c. My deciding factors were expandability & screen size. I made cardboard cut-outs of the Quest & 276. I then sat on the bike & held each in various mounting positions. That made the decision very easy.

 

Now I'll spend the next three weeks deciding how/where to mount it. crazy.gif

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Stan Walker

Popped for the 276c

 

Really good choice for the right reason. Now for some more good news:

 

When you get the unit you will find that 100% of that large screen is usable for maps if you choose having just 4 data fields in the overlay mode. This mode puts one "see through" data field in each corner and displays map everywhere including behind the data fields. Contrast this with most(all?) of the smaller units that use up what little map space they have to display data fields, often 1/3 or more of their screen is gone before you even start to display the maps.

 

You will love the 276C. Like the V it is fully configurable with almost every option Garmin could think of. There is an option on the "trip" page that will allow you to display about 16 different data fields at the same time, 10 of which are selectable from a list of about 50 or so, including voltage, sunrise, sunset, etc.

 

Stan

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Popped for the 276c

 

Really good choice for the right reason. Now for some more good news:

 

Really, really wish they did this model with the European basemap! bncry.gif

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Ditto to the 276C

 

I also liked that the transition in the learning curve was very easy since the controls and functions are so much like the V

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Any idea if the 276 has a volt meter available on it? My 3+ has one. I wasn't able to find it on my GPS5. Ended up using both,would like to get rid of one of them or both if the 276 had that option.

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John, at The GPS Store is high on the 2720. What is the experience with the touch screen in this context? I have mixed feeling? This unit supposidly has a brighter daylight screen, but few options to power it. (No battery)

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Joe Frickin' Friday
Any idea if the 276 has a volt meter available on it? My 3+ has one. I wasn't able to find it on my GPS5. Ended up using both,would like to get rid of one of them or both if the 276 had that option.

 

yes, can confirm 276c has a source voltage readout.

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Stan Walker

yes, can confirm 276c has a source voltage readout.

 

And you can have it on the main map screen, or on the trip screen, or on both if it toots your horn..... smile.gif

 

Stan

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Really, really wish they did this model with the European basemap!

They do: Garmin UK 276C page.

 

GPS Warehouse has it in an 'automotive' bundle with City Select; it's also compatible with City Navigator Europe.

 

AFAIK, basemap is not very important (useless for all but the most basic route information): it's the map data loaded into memory that makes the difference.

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I’m unfamiliar with using the source voltage readout on the 276c. I’ve never used it but I’ve seen the parameter for it. Could someone help me out and educate me on the value and use?

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I’m unfamiliar with using the source voltage readout on the 276c. I’ve never used it but I’ve seen the parameter for it. Could someone help me out and educate me on the value and use?
A voltage readout can give a rough indication of charging system performance and perhaps help the operator to catch a developing problem earlier than possible with the 'go/no-go' charging warning lamp in the instrument cluster (which like most such warnings only tell you after something's gone wrong, rather than providing any advance warning.)

 

In general you should see around 13.5 to 14.5 volts on your electical system buss when the engine is running and if it drops into the 12-volt range or below then you've likely got a charging system problem (I'm sure those who use a voltmeter in daily use can chime in with some more precise nominal readings for the oilheads.)

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday
I’m unfamiliar with using the source voltage readout on the 276c. I’ve never used it but I’ve seen the parameter for it. Could someone help me out and educate me on the value and use?

 

When you plug in external power, it tells you the voltage being applied to that plug by the external source. Thus, if the plug is wired to the bike, the voltage readout may be a handy roadside diagnostic for electrical troubles with the bike.

 

IIRC, it shows GPS battery voltage when not plugged into anything.

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