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Tire Inflator?


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Is there a consensus as to which one is the best?  Looking to upgrade from my small, manual bicycle Topeak.

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Scotto336

I've used CO2 cartridges successfully in the past after plugging.  They take up minimal space.  Just be sure to leave your glove on.  They get very cold!  I used one on a friend's bike just 2 weeks ago.  

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dirtrider
16 hours ago, Paddler said:

Is there a consensus as to which one is the best?  Looking to upgrade from my small, manual bicycle Topeak.

Morning   Paddler

 

It sort of depends on what you want to do with it. If just an occasional use to add air to a low tire then small will work, & if you remove the outside case, the pump itself packs a lot smaller. I usually shorten the hose & add wire length to the pump motor as a longer wire packs smaller than a longer hose.

 

Now if you are looking to inflate large completely out of air tires or inflate air mattresses, etc then you need to do some research to verify the pump has a metal piston. Unfortunately a number tire inflater pumps now have plastic pistons & those can melt under extended usages.

 

The little Slime pumps used to be a good deal but I'm pretty sure they now have plastic pistons (needs to be verified).    

 

You also need to define how you are going to power the pump. If you have newer BMW (computer controlled) power outlet motorcycle then you have a 10 amp cap on pump power usage. If you have an older (real early)  1200  then you only have 5 amps at the power outlet to use. But you can always go battery direct to power about any of them.  

 

Something like the Moto Pump I believe only uses 5 amps but it's pressure output I think is maxed at around 40psi or so & they are slow to fill larger tires.  But should be fine for topping off or occasional use. 

 

If you are just using it to top off a couple of pounds at tire checking (especially on multiple motorcycles)  then some of the new wireless pumps have caught my eye). I have no history or usage of those but they sure look intriguing to me (seeing as I  ride a lot of off-road at very low tire pressure then need to re-inflate for on-road hi-way longer runs. 

 

Possibly something like the Airmoto (not sure on how good it works but it sure looks handy).

 

 

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Skywagon
11 hours ago, Rougarou said:

the itty bitty slime pump, I got it because DR recommended it in some thread some years ago

 

The same...I have one on the bike that I've had to use twice when tire got a hole in it, and I keep one in my car that I've used once to repair a full size boat trailer tire...took a while on the full size tire but it worked.  I ran it about 5 minutes or so, let it cool, rinse and repeat.

 

I have a pigtail to the battery for my battery charger.  I use the same pigtail for the slime pump rather than the accessory outlet.

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Dave_in_TX
57 minutes ago, dirtrider said:

 

Something like the Moto Pump I believe only uses 5 amps but it's pressure output I think is maxed at around 40psi or so & they are slow to fill larger tires.  But should be fine for topping off or occasional use. 

 

 

I currently have a Motopump (older version). It is significantly more powerful than the Slime pump it replaced. I don't know what its maximum pressure is but I have inflated motorcycle tires to 45psi with it.

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Paddler
1 hour ago, Dave_in_TX said:

 

Thanks, everybody.  I read the same review linked above, which said that the Slime inflator uses a male cigarette lighter plug instead of the more common SAE connector.  I also have an SAE pigtail on my battery for trickle charging, so prefer that.  The Motopumps Airshot 2.0 looks like a good one, a bit more expensive at $80 but made here in the USA and has a 5-year warranty.  The Bike Master Mini Air tested well and is half the price. 

 

This will be just for roadside puncture repairs.  I also bought the Nealey tire repair kit, which is different from the rope type in that no reaming is required.  Anybody else here use the Nealey?

 

https://www.amazon.com/Nealey-Repair-Truck-Mower-Motorcycle/dp/B075D6KZ5Y/ref=asc_df_B075D6KZ5Y/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=693070740235&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13125803110219508725&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9052142&hvtargid=pla-1946339243228&psc=1&mcid=0ec0d1d426d03312a1ca4bbd2ab6266c&gad_source=1 

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taylor1

I bought a moto pump over 15 years ago. Used it twice for flat and plugged rear tires.
A few years back I was checking my gear before heading out to the UN in W.V. and found that the pump was froze. I contacted the company to see if there was anything I could do or parts that could be replaced, also told them that I had the pump for over 10 years and that I would be leaving on a trip in less than a week. They said no problem and 2 day shipped me a new pump at no cost to me. I offered to pay as I figured I got more than my money's worth already. They refused and said they stand behind their product. They may or may not be the best pump out there, but I don't believe anyone will beat their customer service. A+

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Paddler
2 minutes ago, taylor1 said:

I bought a moto pump over 15 years ago. Used it twice for flat and plugged rear tires.
A few years back I was checking my gear before heading out to the UN in W.V. and found that the pump was froze. I contacted the company to see if there was anything I could do or parts that could be replaced, also told them that I had the pump for over 10 years and that I would be leaving on a trip in less than a week. They said no problem and 2 day shipped me a new pump at no cost to me. I offered to pay as I figured I got more than my money's worth already. They refused and said they stand behind their product. They may or may not be the best pump out there, but I don't believe anyone will beat their customer service. A+

 

Excellent information.  Motopump it is.  I love it when people stand behind their products, which is why I like my Aerostich gear.

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Dave_in_TX
24 minutes ago, Paddler said:

 

Thanks, everybody.  I read the same review linked above, which said that the Slime inflator uses a male cigarette lighter plug instead of the more common SAE connector.  I also have an SAE pigtail on my battery for trickle charging, so prefer that.  The Motopumps Airshot 2.0 looks like a good one, a bit more expensive at $80 but made here in the USA and has a 5-year warranty.  The Bike Master Mini Air tested well and is half the price. 

 

This will be just for roadside puncture repairs.  I also bought the Nealey tire repair kit, which is different from the rope type in that no reaming is required.  Anybody else here use the Nealey?

 

https://www.amazon.com/Nealey-Repair-Truck-Mower-Motorcycle/dp/B075D6KZ5Y/ref=asc_df_B075D6KZ5Y/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=693070740235&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13125803110219508725&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9052142&hvtargid=pla-1946339243228&psc=1&mcid=0ec0d1d426d03312a1ca4bbd2ab6266c&gad_source=1 

I also use the Nealey repair kit. I have had to use it a few times and am a satisfied customer.

 

I also am a Motopump user.

 

 

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Paddler
4 minutes ago, Dave_in_TX said:

I also use the Nealey repair kit. I have had to use it a few times and am a satisfied customer.

 

I also am a Motopump user.

 

 

 

Cool.  My Nealey kit will be here tomorrow and I just ordered the pump.  I may need to leave my camera tripod behind but hopefully everything will fit.  Thanks again everybody.

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strataj

I have the Aerostich been great.  On a group ride one of the riders had a flat and some pulled out a battery operated pump.  He set the pressure and it work great,  I have to say it very easy to use.  On another ride a guy used the Micro Start. It required more amps then his fuse allowed, the owner of the pump said he needed to changed his out to a 15 amp.  I did do a nice job but 15 amps ? 

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Skywagon

I’ve used mcneely twice. You do have to poke through and clean the hole a bit. Do yourself a favor, go to your local hardware store and add one of these to your mcneely kit. It makes a great handle to use shoving that poker through the hole. 

75413829-16CB-4404-9F5C-5808659B3FC3.jpeg

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RTinNC
1 hour ago, Skywagon said:

I’ve used mcneely twice. You do have to poke through and clean the hole a bit. Do yourself a favor, go to your local hardware store and add one of these to your mcneely kit. It makes a great handle to use shoving that poker through the hole. 

75413829-16CB-4404-9F5C-5808659B3FC3.jpeg

:18:

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RTinNC

I bought 2 of these about 6 months ago and am very happy with this product.  VERY VERY small and comes in a nice small case. 

 

I tested it on my RT and it filled my rear tire to 30 PSI in exactly 5 min with not a sign of over heating.   Happy I swapped out my budget Slime inflators which worked OK but not as good or small as this! 

 

https://www.rockycreekdesigns.com/products/copy-of-motopressor-pocket-pump

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Hey guys, did you check the 'ARI AirPlugger' over the MotoPump site? Looks great, especially for $12. And the plugs look similar to the Nealey ones. I also have a Nealey kit under the seat already, along with some CO2 cartridges. But would like to be safer with a pump. Will probably order the MotoPump, but would like to check the amperage of the fuse on my battery pigtail. I never did, but think they're super low, like 3A. I'd change it for 10 (or 15?), to be able to use it for that, and not having to carry the BMW plug...but need to remove the battery; what a drag. Anyway, does anybody know the BMW plug's amperage on my 2020 R? 10A? Tried looking for that info on the owner's manual, and couldn't find it. Just out of curiosity. I'm using that circuit to charge my iPhone, by the way, but left the plug operational in place (used a 'Y' BMW adapter). Thanks.

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Paddler
18 minutes ago, JCtx said:

Hey guys, did you check the 'ARI AirPlugger' over the MotoPump site? Looks great, especially for $12. And the plugs look similar to the Nealey ones. I also have a Nealey kit under the seat already, along with some CO2 cartridges. But would like to be safer with a pump. Will probably order the MotoPump, but would like to check the amperage of the fuse on my battery pigtail. I never did, but think they're super low, like 3A. I'd change it for 10 (or 15?), to be able to use it for that, and not having to carry the BMW plug...but need to remove the battery; what a drag. Anyway, does anybody know the BMW plug's amperage on my 2020 R? 10A? Tried looking for that info on the owner's manual, and couldn't find it. Just out of curiosity. I'm using that circuit to charge my iPhone, by the way, but left the plug operational in place (used a 'Y' BMW adapter). Thanks.

 

Those are rope plugs which require reamming.  The Nealey plugs are thinner and reamming isn't required.  

 

The Motopump draws 7.5A according to the guys on Expedition Portal.  See Dave's link above.

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Skywagon
1 hour ago, Paddler said:

he Nealey plugs are thinner and reamming isn't required

 

Not quite right  Watch the Nealey video.  If you don't open the hole, then the probability the patch will fail increases.  I'm not sure which tires carry steal belts, but if jacket belt is left, it will increase the likelihood the plug will be cut.  It takes just a few seconds to ream the hole.

 

 

 

 

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Dave_in_TX
5 hours ago, Skywagon said:

 

Not quite right  Watch the Nealey video.  If you don't open the hole, then the probability the patch will fail increases.  I'm not sure which tires carry steal belts, but if jacket belt is left, it will increase the likelihood the plug will be cut.  It takes just a few seconds to ream the hole.

 

 

 

 

You don't actually ream the hole, you just use the insertion tool to get wires from steel belts away from hole. The hole isn't made bigger.

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wbw6cos

At home, I have had to ream the hole with a drill, which was too small for the insertion tool.  I used a drill bit that was approximately the size of the Nealey tool.   It does seem counterproductive to make a small hole in a tire a bit bigger, but when properly done the Nealey repair will last.  My most recent repair lasted the life of the new tire, which was about 5,500 miles (remaining.)  :bike:

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taylor1

Always carry both the stop and go and the Nealey. A little while back they said the maker of Nealey was going to retire and wasn't sure if someone would carry the torch, so I thought I should get some before they're gone. A neighbor came over one day and complained he got a screw in his brand-new tire on his F250. Told him we could probably fix it. Screw was on the beginning of the outside radius of the tread. Tried the stop and go twice and it kept leaking. Then went to the Nealey and it stopped the leak on the first try. Told him that was a temporary fix until he could get to a tire shop. 4 months later he is still driving on it. Oh well
 

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RTinNC
4 hours ago, wbw6cos said:

At home, I have had to ream the hole with a drill, which was too small for the insertion tool.  I used a drill bit that was approximately the size of the Nealey tool.   It does seem counterproductive to make a small hole in a tire a bit bigger, but when properly done the Nealey repair will last.  My most recent repair lasted the life of the new tire, which was about 5,500 miles (remaining.)  :bike:

Yup .... I have done the same exact process and the Nealey plugs worked like a champ! 

 

Have never been a fan of the Stop-n-go mushrooms. 

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Rougarou
1 hour ago, taylor1 said:

Always carry both the stop and go and the Nealey. A little while back they said the maker of Nealey was going to retire and wasn't sure if someone would carry the torch, so I thought I should get some before they're gone. A neighbor came over one day and complained he got a screw in his brand-new tire on his F250. Told him we could probably fix it. Screw was on the beginning of the outside radius of the tread. Tried the stop and go twice and it kept leaking. Then went to the Nealey and it stopped the leak on the first try. Told him that was a temporary fix until he could get to a tire shop. 4 months later he is still driving on it. Oh well
 


i left a nail in one of my Jeep tires for a couple years. Never leaked as far as i could tell

 

once it rusted out, then it bubbled air, so i plugged it

 

1 hour ago, RTinNC said:

Yup .... I have done the same exact process and the Nealey plugs worked like a champ! 

 

Have never been a fan of the Stop-n-go mushrooms. 


 

Ive used the mushrooms on tractors snd trucks with no issues. Gotta pull it back purty decent to seat it well

 

Not had to do a bike yet

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Paddler
10 hours ago, Dave_in_TX said:

You don't actually ream the hole, you just use the insertion tool to get wires from steel belts away from hole. The hole isn't made bigger.

 

Yep, the instructions on the kit say to insert the unloaded tool into the hole and rock the handle vigorously to clean the hole.  Sound great, and the kit is very compact.

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9Mary7

I've only had to repair one puncture, a rear, and it was while I was riding the City's Authority bike. 

Naturally I sought out the nearest fire station and rode into the air conditioned Engine room to plug the tire. Genuine BMW rope plug to fix and then fire station air compressor filled it right up in about 30 seconds........... This is why I am nice to firemans.  :thumbsup:

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wbw6cos

Yeah, I would hate for someone to cite you for blocking a fire lane, or something.  :burnout:

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Dave_in_TX

Picked this up in Clovis NM on a Sunsay morning, 500 miles from home. Used two Nealey strings (probably should have ysed three). Tire had a slow leak but it got me home with two stops to add air.

IMG_20240707_072346.jpg

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dirtrider
21 hours ago, Rougarou said:

 

Ive used the mushrooms on tractors snd trucks with no issues. Gotta pull it back purty decent to seat it well

 

Not had to do a bike yet

Morning Rougarou

 

I don't know if all those pull-to-seat mushroom plugs are the same but most only seal to the plug stem not the mushroom part. 

 

Years ago I tested a mushroom plug (actually tested a string type also) on an old tire just before replacement removal.  I plugged both types in the same tire.

 

I used a large 16d nail to puncture the tire so that did require opening the holes a little for both the mushroom & the rope/string plugs.

 

After I installed both in the same tire (same place on the tire  about 1-1/2" off center), then rode the motorcycle to work & home.

 

Both held air, but when testing the push through force to  push the plug back through into the tire (like riding over small odd shaped stones)  I got an unexpected surprise. 

 

I used a Phillips screwdriver slightly smaller than plug size & the mushroom plug pushed all the way into the tire rather easily (way easier than I thought it would), that also left a big air leak that would flatten the tire pretty quickly. (big surprise I didn't expect)

 

So I re-plugged the tire in that location, then re-inflated the tire, then repeated the push through test on the rope/string plug. That took a lot more force to push the screwdriver through but it also gave me something unexpected. It didn't push the entire string through, just some of it so the hole sort of re-sealed from the remaining part of the rope/string. Now this was on a one day fresh install so I don't know if only part of the string would have pushed through after many days & multiple heat cycles.

 

But on that very limited test it was an eye opener for me. 


My recommendation  is to test it for yourself using your mushroom plugging device & your current mushroom plugs to see how you feel about their push through integrity & quick air release if one would push through. Maybe your mushroom plugs work better or different than mine did.  

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Rougarou

Didja cut the mushroom stem to the depth of the tread?

 

There's chances in everything we do and the chances of one of these types actually hitting that odd shaped rock are likely small.

 

I 'memba my dad plugging tires with string type plugs,.....once plugged, he'd light it and let it burn for a bit,.....haven't seen that in years.  I guess the idea was that the plug would melt to the tire, I dunno. 

 

Maybe carry a bit of rubber cement to add to the mushroom head before it goes in the tire,......I've yet to use it on the bikes, but have used it on tractors and trucks with on issues.

 

Thanks for your experience on this, it's now a thought of consideration.

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dirtrider
12 minutes ago, Rougarou said:

Didja cut the mushroom stem to the depth of the tread?

 

Morning Rougarou

 

Yes, I pulled it tight then cut it off flush with the tire surface. 

 

The reason that I tested was I ride a lot of gravel roads & chip seal roads that get re-surfaced every few years (lots of small stones). I had heard of plugs being pushed back in so decided to test it myself on a tire I was about to replace. I did pick a somewhat thicker off center to test so I wasn't testing a paper thin area. 

 

I have pretty well always been a rope/string guy anyway as I never seem to get a nice round puncture. The puncture is usually a slit or ragged shape that a mushroom is probably not the best choice to use. With enough ropes or strings pushed in you can seal about anything to at least get you to a place to find a new (or used) replacement tire.   

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I received both the Nealey kit and the Motopump now and am quiet pleased with both.  I'm thinking 5 minutes to plug the hole and another 5 minutes to reinflate.  The Motopump was the fastest of the inflators tested, and at 5 minutes it pumped the rire to 47PSI.  Nice.

 

I've read that the rope plugs, and I'm assuming the Nealeys also, vulcanize to the tire.  Not sure the Stop and Go mushrooms do as well.  I think it would be kind of iffy trying to get enough glue in the right place with the mushrooms given the method of installation.  

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8 hours ago, Paddler said:

I received both the Nealey kit and the Motopump now and am quiet pleased with both.  I' thinking 5 minutes to plug the hole and another 5 minutes to reinflate.  The Motopump was the fastest of the inflators tested, and at 5 minutes it pumped the rire to 47PSI.  Nice.

 

I've read that the rope plugs, and I'm assuming the Nealeys also, vulcanize to the tire.  Not sure the Stop and Go mushrooms do as well.  I think it would be kind of iffy trying to get enough glue in the right place with the mushrooms given the method of installation.  

The Nealey strings will vulcanize to the tire. That isn't true of all string plugs. That is why many strings require glue.

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I tested the Motopump inflator today.  I had the bike power on and the menu showing tire pressure.  I let air out gradually, stopping several times to look for the TPMS warning.  It wasn't on at 31.5PSI, but came on at 30.1PSI.  I let air out to 20PSI and hooked up the Motopump.  At 2 minutes inflation time my Milton gauge read just under 34PSI, at 3 minutes it was at ~39PSI, and at 4 minutes it was 44PSI on my Milton gauge.  The Motopump pressure gauge included in the kit read 41PSI, and the bike read 39.7PSI.  I'm pretty sure the bike read low because it's 101F here presently.

 

The base of the inflator hose got hot to the touch, so a brief waiting period seems prudent before putting it back in its pouch.  And another take home, the included tire pressure gauge is more than good enough.  Very pleased with my purchase.

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How big is the MotoPump? And how much does it weigh? The one above (AirMoto) reportedly is 1.6x2.4x6.1", and weighs 1.25 lbs. Says it works 40 min continuously, but I don't believe that for a second. Maybe without nothing connected, but that wouldn't be real use.

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It's Not tiny but not too big. I can't measure it now. I'm fishing. Doesn't make sense to me to buy a battery operated tire inflator when the motorcycle has a perfectly good battery to use.

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37 minutes ago, Paddler said:

It's Not tiny but not too big. I can't measure it now. I'm fishing. Doesn't make sense to me to buy a battery operated tire inflator when the motorcycle has a perfectly good battery to use.

 

Your bike battery died and you just fixed a flat tire, so you need to used your battery operated inflator  to pump up your fixed flat so you can push start your bike old school style.:grin:

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I feel the same way (use bike's battery). If the MotoPump is smaller and lighter, I'd get that one too. I only ask because both cost the same. Couldn't find dimensions and weight on the MotoPump. Thank you.

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2 hours ago, Rougarou said:

 

Your bike battery died and you just fixed a flat tire, so you need to used your battery operated inflator  to pump up your fixed flat so you can push start your bike old school style.:grin:

 

 It's hard to ride a bike with a dead battery far enough to get a flat tire.

 

27 minutes ago, JCtx said:

I feel the same way (use bike's battery). If the MotoPump is smaller and lighter, I'd get that one too. I only ask because both cost the same. Couldn't find dimensions and weight on the MotoPump. Thank you.

 

In its soft, padded pouch it weighs 1.25#.  The pouch packed with the kit measures 7.5" x 8" x 2.4".

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