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Basic maintenance specs (capacities, torques)?


Joe Frickin' Friday

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Joe Frickin' Friday

The rider's manual that came with my '23 R1250RT includes all the torque specs you need for removing/installing the wheels.  So, great, I can do tire changes, that's helpful.  But what about other routine maintenance items?  I understand there's no BMW service manual available for owners to buy from the dealer, and it looks like there's nothing from Haynes or Clymer. 

 

Are there older 1250 bikes that do have a service manual available, with specs that are transferrable to my bike?  I'm wondering about basic things like:

 

  • drain and fill plug torques for the engine, gearbox, and final drive
  • oil capacities for the gearbox and final drive
  • oil type for the gearbox (70W-80 like the final drive?)
  • Rear brake caliper bolt torque
  • Front and rear brake bleeder torques

 

 

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RadioFlyer

For most of its history BMW Motorrad made service information available. This enabled owners and independent techs to undertake most service and repair procedures themselves. For many doing one's own maintenance is a valued part of the motorcycle ownership experience. For others, who live far from the nearest BMW dealership or who embark on a great adventure to remote places, doing it yourself is the only option. Similarly independent techs having service information give greater choice to those who don't want to DIY.

 

All that changed in 2021 when BMW discontinued the provision of service information on ALL bikes old and new. Only bootleg copies of the factory service manual are available now. Haynes/Clymer/Chilton haven't produced a BMW motorcycle manual since 2018. If you own one of the most recent models you are totally out of luck.

 

More and more we hear that BMW dealerships will not service bikes older than 10 years. When you combine the absence of service information with the unavailability of dealer service it does not bode at all well for the resale value of recent BMW bikes.

 

Fortunately there are quality alternative motorcycle manufacturers out there still offering service manuals. No way will I buy a motorcycle for which the manufacturer will not sell a service manual.  

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Well Mitch since the introduction of the WetHead in 2014, the transmission uses the same oil as the motor.

So there is no separate gear box oil or drain/fill plug.

The torque for the engine drain plug, the crush washer size and oil filter torque is the same as the WetHead motors.

The mounting torque settings for the rear brake and front brake caliper is the same as for the WetHead bikes.

The main difference is in the valve train.

 

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I agree Mitch. What happened to right to repair laws? BMW has done this in the past and been forced later to release information to the aftermarket. I don't know if they found a loophole.

 

Final drive capacity is still 180ml.

 

Most torques for major components like brake caliper mounting bolts can be gleaned from a torque chart by bolt size. The chart attached is maximums so you may want to back it off a bit but it's a good place to start.

 

Metric bolt torque specs.

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That's the best file I've seen. I replaced the one I had before. I really wish there was a service manual for a 1250, but they came out in 2019, and apprently BMW stopped making manuals in 2018, so no dice. Oh well. So for shift-cam valve adjustments when cams have to come out, are folks here using the 1200 torque specs??? Guess they should be very similar. And the actuator could be guessed by the size of the bolt, I'd assume. Will check BoxFlyer videos for that. Also curious about coolant change on 1250s; hopefully no need for vacuum filling.

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2 hours ago, JCtx said:

I really wish there was a service manual for a 1250, but they came out in 2019, and apprently BMW stopped making manuals in 2018, so no dice.

 

Wrong. I have the factory genuine repair DVD for the shiftcam bikes up to the 10.25 " TFT version from a dealer in Germany. They (the dealers) around the world ran out of stock sometime in 2020 or 2021.

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Dave_in_TX
5 hours ago, JCtx said:

That's the best file I've seen. I replaced the one I had before. I really wish there was a service manual for a 1250, but they came out in 2019, and apprently BMW stopped making manuals in 2018, so no dice. Oh well. So for shift-cam valve adjustments when cams have to come out, are folks here using the 1200 torque specs??? Guess they should be very similar. And the actuator could be guessed by the size of the bolt, I'd assume. Will check BoxFlyer videos for that. Also curious about coolant change on 1250s; hopefully no need for vacuum filling.

Boxflyer's YouTube videos or the video available from JVB (for a price) should give all you need to do valve checks or adjustments.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
11 hours ago, Bernie said:

Well Mitch since the introduction of the WetHead in 2014, the transmission uses the same oil as the motor.

So there is no separate gear box oil or drain/fill plug.

 

D'OH!  Forgot about that.  That'll be nice, actually.  I always found it a PITA to drain the gearbox oil from my 1100 and 1200; it seemed like no matter what I did, I was guaranteed to get gear oil slathered onto the centerstand and garage floor.  

 

9 hours ago, Dave_in_TX said:

This will have most of the torque specs: http://jimvonbaden.com/Wethead Torques 4.pdf 

 

Wow, that's pretty thorough - thanks!

 

10 hours ago, Dan M said:

What happened to right to repair laws?

 

Digging around a bit, it looks like most of the legislative effort has focused on handheld electronics (which are often not designed for repairability) and farm equipment (for which manufacturers had been restricting the sales of diagnostic equipment).  Massachusetts passed an automotive right-to-repair bill in 2012 (text here), and yeah, it sure looks like it requires manufacturers to provide access to diagnostic and repair info:

 

Quote

Section 2. Commencing with new motor vehicle model year 2015 and thereafter, no manufacturer of a motor vehicle may sell or lease or offer for sale or lease, directly or through a dealer, a new motor vehicle without affording to the owner access to the same diagnostic and repair information relative to said new motor vehicle that the manufacturer makes available to its dealers and authorized repair facilities.


The manufacturer shall maintain a diagnostic and repair information system which shall enable the owner of the motor vehicle or the owner's designated independent repair facility, the capability to utilize such system via the worldwide web or other electronically available manufacturer repair information system on a hourly, daily, monthly or yearly subscription basis at cost and terms that are no greater than fair market value and nondiscriminatory as compared with the terms and costs charged to dealers or authorized repair facilities.
Manufacturers shall provide access to their diagnostic and repair information system through a non-proprietary vehicle interface that complies with SAE J2534 as required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 40 CFR § 86.1808-01(f). The manufacturer's diagnostic and repair information system shall provide the same diagnostic and repair information, including technical updates, which the manufacturer makes available to its dealers and authorized motor vehicle repair facilities. The content of said diagnostic and repair information system shall be in the same form and shall be accessed in the same manner as is available to dealers and authorized motor vehicle repair facilities utilizing said information system. Manufacturers shall exclude diagnostic, service and repair information necessary to reset a vehicle immobilizer system. Information necessary to reset a vehicle immobilizer system shall be obtained by dealers, authorized motor vehicle repair facilities, motor vehicle owners and independent motor vehicle repair facilities through the secure data release model system as currently used by the National Automotive Service Task Force or other known, reliable and accepted law enforcement Internet-based systems.

Section 3. For vehicles manufactured from 2002 through the model year 2014, a manufacturer of motor vehicles sold in the commonwealth shall make available for purchase by owners of motor vehicles manufactured by the manufacturer and by independent repair facilities the same diagnostic and repair information, including repair technical updates, that the manufacturer makes available to its dealers and authorized repair facilities through the manufacturer's world wide web diagnostic and repair information system or other electronically available manufacturers repair information system.


All content of said repair information system shall be made available to owners and to independent repair facilities in the same form and manner and to the same extent as is made available to dealers and authorized repair facilities utilizing said repair information system.

 

And according to Wikipedia:

Quote

Early in 2014, the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association, Coalition for Auto Repair Equality, Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, and the Association for Global Automakers signed a memorandum of understanding that is based on the Massachusetts law and which would commit the vehicle manufacturers to meet the requirements of the Massachusetts law in all fifty states.

 

it's not clear just how binding that MOU was, since the article uses weasel words like "would" instead of "did."  

 

Bottom line, it's not clear to me what BMW is legally required to make available to US owners outside of Massachusetts.  For the time being, I just want to be able to do routine service at home without the cost and time associated with relying on the dealer.  With the PDF files and other info people have shared, I'm in good shape for now.  Thanks.  :wave:

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Dave_in_TX
3 hours ago, Joe Frickin' Friday said:

Digging around a bit, it looks like most of the legislative effort has focused on handheld electronics (which are often not designed for repairability) and farm equipment (for which manufacturers had been restricting the sales of diagnostic equipment).  Massachusetts passed an automotive right-to-repair bill in 2012 (text here), and yeah, it sure looks like it requires manufacturers to provide access to diagnostic and repair info:

 

And there is currently a bill in congress that focusses on real time data and related information for vehicles. However, what I get from reading the bill is that it only focusses on access to realtime data and repair information for the related systems. Looks to me like there is a a large loophole that would allow someone to use realtime data to diagnose a problem in a mechanical area (such as suspension) but would not require the manufacture to provide repair information for it.

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Scotto336
On 4/17/2024 at 8:19 PM, Dan M said:

I agree Mitch. What happened to right to repair laws? BMW has done this in the past and been forced later to release information to the aftermarket. I don't know if they found a loophole.

 

Final drive capacity is still 180ml.

 

Most torques for major components like brake caliper mounting bolts can be gleaned from a torque chart by bolt size. The chart attached is maximums so you may want to back it off a bit but it's a good place to start.

 

Metric bolt torque specs.

I would use caution with these values.  They are for the steel threads on the fastener only, NOT steel into aluminum.  Best to stick with the values in Dave's link.

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RadioFlyer
On 4/18/2024 at 7:12 AM, Dave_in_TX said:

And there is currently a bill in congress that focusses on real time data and related information for vehicles. However, what I get from reading the bill is that it only focusses on access to realtime data and repair information for the related systems. Looks to me like there is a a large loophole that would allow someone to use realtime data to diagnose a problem in a mechanical area (such as suspension) but would not require the manufacture to provide repair information for it.

 

The bill can be found here:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/118th-congress/house-bill/906

 

Everyone here should express their support for the bill to their representative.

 

My reading would suggest that the information to be provided is more general.

 

(3) CRITICAL REPAIR INFORMATION AND TOOLS.—The term “critical repair information and tools” means all necessary technical and compatibility information, tools, equipment, schematics, parts nomenclature and descriptions, parts catalogs, repair procedures, training materials, software, and technology, specifically including but not limited to information related to diagnostics, repair, service, calibration or recalibration of parts and systems to return a vehicle to operational specifications.

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Dave_in_TX
2 hours ago, RadioFlyer said:

 

The bill can be found here:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/118th-congress/house-bill/906

 

Everyone here should express their support for the bill to their representative.

 

My reading would suggest that the information to be provided is more general.

 

(3) CRITICAL REPAIR INFORMATION AND TOOLS.—The term “critical repair information and tools” means all necessary technical and compatibility information, tools, equipment, schematics, parts nomenclature and descriptions, parts catalogs, repair procedures, training materials, software, and technology, specifically including but not limited to information related to diagnostics, repair, service, calibration or recalibration of parts and systems to return a vehicle to operational specifications.

Well, we differ on that and I have seen my interpretation stated elsewhere on the web.

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It's not published in the service manual, BMW now recommends Hypoid G3 gear oil for the final drive assy...it has better shear properties than conventional gear oil, cost is significantly more but usage @180ml / 12K miles is not that bad.

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Dave_in_TX
36 minutes ago, sxc said:

It's not published in the service manual, BMW now recommends Hypoid G3 gear oil for the final drive assy...it has better shear properties than conventional gear oil, cost is significantly more but usage @180ml / 12K miles is not that bad.

G3 is simply BMW's designation/branding of a gear oil. I doubt it's really any better than any other synthetic GL5 gear oil. If you want a 70w80 GL5 gear oil, Mopar has one.

 

The owner's manual for my 2020 R1250GS said to use 70w80 GL5 G3. The owner's manual for my 2023 simply says 79w80 but I'm sure it still should beGL5 as opposed to GL4.

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It's the same 1250 final drive unit since 2019 (and maybe even before that), so there's nothing physically different. BMW keeps changing recommendations, like the LV brake fluid too, but if you use what was originally intended, which I believe was 75w90 GL5 for the final drive, and DOT4 for the brakes, it should be perfectly fine, instead of 75w80 and DOT4 LV brake fluid. Many of us use the former fluids with zero issues.

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dirtrider
20 minutes ago, JCtx said:

It's the same 1250 final drive unit since 2019 (and maybe even before that), so there's nothing physically different. BMW keeps changing recommendations, like the LV brake fluid too, but if you use what was originally intended, which I believe was 75w90 GL5 for the final drive, and DOT4 for the brakes, it should be perfectly fine, instead of 75w80 and DOT4 LV brake fluid. Many of us use the former fluids with zero issues.

Afternoon JCtx

 

You don't need LV brake fluid right up until the time that you do!

 

For most riding conditions regular brake fluid will probably work just fine. It's when you need quick ABS or DTC response in cold weather on a very slick surface that you will probably wish that you had it.

 

The LV fluid has proven to be a big asset in ABS & traction control on the automotive side & when BMW phased in the quick response dynamic traction control (DTC) the LV fluid was recommended. 

 

With all the newer quick-response ABS/traction control systems most of the auto manufacturers have pretty well gone to LV across the board.  

 

  

 

 

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1 hour ago, dirtrider said:

For most riding conditions regular brake fluid will probably work just fine.

Indeed, and that's exactly why I'm still using DOT4. I don't ride in winter (it's a naked bike:D); the coldest I ride is 60F. For the same reason, 75w90 final drive fluid is perfectly fine too:cool:.

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dirtrider
12 hours ago, JCtx said:

Indeed, and that's exactly why I'm still using DOT4. I don't ride in winter (it's a naked bike:D); the coldest I ride is 60F. For the same reason, 75w90 final drive fluid is perfectly fine too:cool:.

Morning JCtx

 

Problem is, you didn't say (I use & the reason why I personally use) you said   "but if you use what was originally intended, which I believe was 75w90 GL5 for the final drive, and DOT4 for the brakes, it should be perfectly fine". It isn't perfectly fine for a number of riders as they ride in cold, freezing, or even sub freezing conditions. 

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Yes, it'd still be perfectly fine to use DOT4 fluid... IF your bike calls for that, like my 2020 does (page 166 of the owner's manual). LV is NOWHERE mentioned. Do you know of any crashes caused by using regular DOT4 fluid? Didn't think so. Do you have any proof LV makes a difference over regular DOT4? Post it, but I bet you don't, because it'd be almost impossible to prove that. And most sane people are not going to ride a bike in freezing conditions anyway, so I don't even think this subject is relevant. So my statement is still valid for bikes that call for DOT4, like mine. Do what you want, and others can make that judgment for themselves.

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Stiggy

And most sane people are not going to ride a bike in freezing conditions anyway, 

 

You mean you haven't seen the little snowflake that appears on the dash on the way out in the morning yet? :)

 

DOT 4 gets stiff at around minus 30 degrees, so I'm not going to worry about that either.

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Bernie
9 hours ago, JCtx said:

And most sane people are not going to ride a bike in freezing conditions anyway, so I don't even think this subject is relevant.

Well, not too many „sane“ riders here in the SouthEast. We will ride regularly all winter long and my friends from the ATL area and around will meet me for lunch during the winter season. They as well as I will see temperatures below 32º F on a regular basis, while riding our bikes. Of course we use heated gear, seats and grips and sometimes even socks.

 

 

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Rougarou
9 hours ago, JCtx said:

And most sane people are not going to ride a bike in freezing conditions anyway, so I don't even think this subject is relevan

 

3* bruh, 3* is the coldest I've gotten down to (before I started using heated gear) and I ride/commute all year/all weather, hot/cold, matters not.  

 

Here's some not so sane people

 

And one more.  This video is the morning after I did a slip and fall on unexpected ice the day prior.

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday
23 minutes ago, Bernie said:

They as well as I will see temperatures below 32º F on a regular basis, while riding our bikes. Of course we use heated gear, seats and grips and sometimes even socks.

 

Back in the early 2000s there was a winter where Shawn and I rode to Sunday club breakfasts all through the winter.  Temps were generally between 20 and and 30 on any of these days, but relative lack of snowfall that season meant roads didn't have much salt/sand/snow/ice on them.  We had heated grips, but that was it - no heated saddle on the R1100RT, and we didn't have any heated gear. 

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MikeB60
Posted (edited)

Most sane people are not going to dispute the wisdom of two of the most knowledgeable people on this board in Boxflyer and Dirtrider when it comes to a recommendation regarding the maintenance of BMW motorcycles.

Edited by MikeB60
Missing word
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MikeB60
Just now, MikeB60 said:

Most sane people are not going to dispute the wisdom of two of the most knowledgeable people on this board in Boxflyer and Dirtrider when it comes to a recommendation regarding the maintenance of BMW motorcycles.

 

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RTinNC
1 hour ago, Bernie said:

Well, not too many „sane“ riders here in the SouthEast. We will ride regularly all winter long and my friends from the ATL area and around will meet me for lunch during the winter season. They as well as I will see temperatures below 32º F on a regular basis, while riding our bikes. Of course we use heated gear, seats and grips and sometimes even socks.

 

 

Ditto for “sane” guys in NC.  
we ride all year and many times are starting out in temperatures at 32° or a bit less..  Those times the forecast is for attempts to get up into the 40s or 50s, but starting out in the high 20s or low 30s is pretty common during our southeast winters here.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
11 hours ago, JCtx said:

Yes, it'd still be perfectly fine to use DOT4 fluid... IF your bike calls for that, like my 2020 does (page 166 of the owner's manual). LV is NOWHERE mentioned. Do you know of any crashes caused by using regular DOT4 fluid? Didn't think so. Do you have any proof LV makes a difference over regular DOT4? Post it, but I bet you don't, because it'd be almost impossible to prove that.

 

Why would BMW change the recommendation to LV if LV doesn't make a difference?

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Dave_in_TX
14 hours ago, JCtx said:

Yes, it'd still be perfectly fine to use DOT4 fluid... IF your bike calls for that, like my 2020 does (page 166 of the owner's manual). LV is NOWHERE mentioned. Do you know of any crashes caused by using regular DOT4 fluid? Didn't think so. Do you have any proof LV makes a difference over regular DOT4? Post it, but I bet you don't, because it'd be almost impossible to prove that. And most sane people are not going to ride a bike in freezing conditions anyway, so I don't even think this subject is relevant. So my statement is still valid for bikes that call for DOT4, like mine. Do what you want, and others can make that judgment for themselves.

Well, the owner's manual isn't always the most accurate/complete source of information. The manual for my 2023 R1250GS says simply to use 70w80 oil for the final drive with no mention of GL5 but you can bet I will only use an oil that meets GL5.

man.jpg

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Dave_in_TX
On 5/6/2024 at 5:13 PM, JCtx said:

... I don't ride in winter (it's a naked bike:D); the coldest I ride is 60F. ..

I guess  you are missing out on some nice riding weather.

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Twisties

I'm sorry, this is the first I've heard of LV brake fluid.  Our manuals specify DOT4.  Can someone point me to the source information for the change.

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Dave_in_TX
8 hours ago, Twisties said:

I'm sorry, this is the first I've heard of LV brake fluid.  Our manuals specify DOT4.  Can someone point me to the source information for the change.

Look at the parts fiche. The BMW fluid is low viscosity.

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Indy Dave
On 5/8/2024 at 7:46 AM, MikeB60 said:

Most sane people are not going to dispute the wisdom of two of the most knowledgeable people on this board in Boxflyer and Dirtrider when it comes to a recommendation regarding the maintenance of BMW motorcycles.

 

Mic Drop :5170:

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RTinNC
On 5/8/2024 at 7:46 AM, MikeB60 said:

Most sane people are not going to dispute the wisdom of two of the most knowledgeable people on this board in Boxflyer and Dirtrider when it comes to a recommendation regarding the maintenance of BMW motorcycles.

Oh yeah !!  Absolutely ! 

 

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Indy Dave
On 5/8/2024 at 7:46 AM, MikeB60 said:

Most sane people are not going to dispute the wisdom of two of the most knowledgeable people on this board in Boxflyer and Dirtrider when it comes to a recommendation regarding the maintenance of BMW motorcycles.

 

 

Fixed it for ya! :read:

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Indy Dave
On 5/7/2024 at 9:29 PM, JCtx said:

Yes, it'd still be perfectly fine to use DOT4 fluid... IF your bike calls for that, like my 2020 does (page 166 of the owner's manual). LV is NOWHERE mentioned. Do you know of any crashes caused by using regular DOT4 fluid? Didn't think so. Do you have any proof LV makes a difference over regular DOT4? Post it, but I bet you don't, because it'd be almost impossible to prove that. And most sane people are not going to ride a bike in freezing conditions anyway, so I don't even think this subject is relevant. So my statement is still valid for bikes that call for DOT4, like mine. Do what you want, and others can make that judgment for themselves.

 

Things change. You know what? My manual for my 2010 RT doesn't specify LV either. But it's become available since then, and now the official BMW REALOEM DOES specify Dot 4 LV.  Why anyone would believe that they know more about the ABS systems than the manufacturer has always been beyond me. And remember - I have a fairly primitive ABS system compared to your newer bikes.... AND STILL BMW calls for LV brake Fluid.

 

While it's ok to question MY sanity - I do ride all year round - freezing temps or no. And so do a lot of folks. If it's not wet/icy, I'm riding regardless of the temps.

 

And while you want to question others use of DOT 4 LV by asking them if they have proof that it works or that it makes a difference, me thinks the BURDEN is ON YOU to prove that it doesn't - after all YOU are the one who is advising against the manufacturer recommended use of DOT 4 LV.  And that BMW is wrong to specify DOT 4 LV just because YOU don't think it matters.

 

I can't think of a more critical system on motorcycles period, let alone when the chips are down than the ABS system. On what authority do you override BMW?

 

EDIT: Added REALOEM spec for my 2010 RT

 

Screenshot(112).thumb.png.e688929f0d6f77cee1f065dfc4d92e1e.png

 

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Skywagon

Well after following the @Boxflyer video's to service all my brakes a couple weeks back, after tire changes, now I see Dot4 is so dial up 1200 baud modem.  On a whim, I thought I would look for some Dot 4LV to have on hand for my next service.  None of my traditional auto part stores had any...... so I'm going to stay with the Dot 4 for the next 6000 miles and see about LV next time.  It's not like it every gets below 10 degrees here....only a few days a year.

 

I wasn't exactly sure what LV was all about....so google and a video later....  Here is a video that might help other folks like me who might not be up on the latest fluids.  

 

What is a DOT 4 LV Brake Fluid (advicsaftermarket.com)

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Indy Dave

You mean this video? :14:

 

Screenshot(117).thumb.png.1811e61307fe007133380eba03a0d9d9.png

 

 

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Twisties
20 hours ago, Skywagon said:

Well after following the @Boxflyer video's to service all my brakes a couple weeks back, after tire changes, now I see Dot4 is so dial up 1200 baud modem.  On a whim, I thought I would look for some Dot 4LV to have on hand for my next service.  None of my traditional auto part stores had any...... so I'm going to stay with the Dot 4 for the next 6000 miles and see about LV next time.  It's not like it every gets below 10 degrees here....only a few days a year.

 

I wasn't exactly sure what LV was all about....so google and a video later....  Here is a video that might help other folks like me who might not be up on the latest fluids.  

 

What is a DOT 4 LV Brake Fluid (advicsaftermarket.com)

Seems like a good video, but how is 750 mm/s less viscous than 1800 mm/s?  I'm confused.  Seems like it's the other way around.  About 2:30 in the video.

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Twisties

I was also wondering about the units.  Seems like it would be units of area, e.g. mm  squared, and in fact that proves correct.  I still can't figure out why something that spreads 750 mm squared / s is less viscous than something that spreads 1800 mm squared / s.

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TSConver
13 hours ago, Twisties said:

Seems like a good video, but how is 750 mm/s less viscous than 1800 mm/s?  I'm confused.  Seems like it's the other way around.  About 2:30 in the video.

Not sure what those units are.   Viscosity's unit of measurement is dynes per square centimeter (dynes/cm2).

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Twisties
55 minutes ago, TSConver said:

Not sure what those units are.   Viscosity's unit of measurement is dynes per square centimeter (dynes/cm2).

Multiple sources say that brake fluid viscosity is measured by the area of spread per second, under defined test conditions.  

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I have a Haynes for my '16 RS and would think it a reasonable assumption that most of the maintenance related torque specs carry over on boxers.  An exception being the shift cam heads.

Haynes Manual 2013-2016 boxers.jpg

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I just looked in the mirror and thought I should be smart enough to figure this out, (some of you have fell off the couch laughing rite about now) but shockingly for others, I'm stuck in disbelief scratching my head once again. How did Mr Boxflyer modify / shave that 16mm torque adapter down to 7.75 thickness? I've been known to be skillful in the art of pretending to be a good welder and dad even went so far as to buy a bunch of stock in grinding wheels when he saw how talented I was. I've lost Sling Blades file he used to trim that lawn mower blade, plus that would take an exorbitant amount of time in which would surely scare off my waffle house girlfriend. YES... WE GOT BACK TOGETHER! 🤣 

Changing my username to "MAYBE NEXT YEAR BRUINS FAN"

Keep smiling boys! 

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7 hours ago, BruinsFan said:

How did Mr Boxflyer modify / shave that 16mm torque adapter down to 7.75 thickness?

 Don't know how Boxflyer did his, I used a grinder to do mine.

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