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Top 3 choices for video mounting equipment


GelStra

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After having seen so many great ride videos, mostly from members here clap.gif, I am considering my options. 3 choices have come up as very viable:

1: Rider's

 

2: Beemer-Biker's

 

3: Sportbikecam's

 

So, we have headlight mount, crashbar mount and tank mount. Any reason to believe any are better or worse than the others? I think David's idea of remote micing would probably be best in all for wind noise purposes. Thanks.

(Tried posting the links as images with no luck. blush.gif)

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Mine is the best. tongue.gif

 

a) Center of the bike.

 

b) Out of the way, with no obstructions.

 

c) A couple of secods to remove in case of rain or as a theft prevention.

 

d) Picks up sound beauitfully, and simple to control with dual lead: remote start/stop and remote mic.

 

Actually, mine would be better if it were lower.

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russell_bynum

For the GS, I think David's mount is just about ideal. (He's right, though...it should be lower.)

 

I've used the tank mount on Lisa's R11RS and on my CBR600RR. In both cases, the windscreen was in the way. Shooting through the windscreen isn't the end of the world, but it isn't ideal either.

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For the GS, I think David's mount is just about ideal. (He's right, though...it should be lower.)

 

I've used the tank mount on Lisa's R11RS and on my CBR600RR. In both cases, the windscreen was in the way. Shooting through the windscreen isn't the end of the world, but it isn't ideal either.

 

Russell,

 

Isn't the trade off, potential debris hitting the camera? I've experimented with the tank bag and 'behind to shield' approach for that reason.

 

Mike O

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For the GS, I think David's mount is just about ideal. (He's right, though...it should be lower.)

That's what I was thinking about the crash bar mount. Also gives perspective with the front wheel in view.

Re: debris. Riding solo, what's going to fly up? You're talking one precise bug to hit the lens DC.

 

 

BTW, how did I just KNOW David would vote his #1? wink.gif

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russell_bynum

Isn't the trade off, potential debris hitting the camera?

 

I guess it's a possibility, but it hasn't been a problem for me. Just put a cheap UV filter on the lens and replace that when/if it gets scratched/chipped/etc.

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Isn't the trade off, potential debris hitting the camera?

 

I guess it's a possibility, but it hasn't been a problem for me. Just put a cheap UV filter on the lens and replace that when/if it gets scratched/chipped/etc.

 

Related question. Are your applications predominately track (where far less debris is expected?) or street as well?

 

I have a cheap digital that will shoot 'lesser quality' video, but have resisted to date exposing it to the sand here in Co.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Regards,

 

Mike O

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russell_bynum
Isn't the trade off, potential debris hitting the camera?

 

I guess it's a possibility, but it hasn't been a problem for me. Just put a cheap UV filter on the lens and replace that when/if it gets scratched/chipped/etc.

 

Related question. Are your applications predominately track (where far less debris is expected?) or street as well?

 

So far, I've only shot one video on the track, everything else has been street.

 

I rode all over the place last summer at Un with a helmet cam attached under the oil cooler of the RT. The lens protector on the helmet cam is still pristine.

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I've used it on the track, on the road, and on nasty dirt stuff in Mexico. It works great. As Russell points out, a cheap UV filter ($6?) is all you need.

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Sounds good... As for filter, I can't buy one for my old camera (this technology changes so fast!). But since it's an old camera, I'm willing to gamble on debris a bit (besides right now I can only velcro it behind the screen anyhow so it's not an issue for me. Mostly just curious).

 

Regards,

 

Mike O

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If it helps you feel better, I've never had one of the UV filters chipped with a rock. There's inevitably a huge bug, though, right when I get a great pass through some nice curves. tongue.gif

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Why not RAM mounts? I haven't tried yet, but that's the avenue I've been considering most seriously.

 

Has anyone here tried them for this purpose? I'm looking specifically at a brake cover or other mount with a small arm and simple camera-mount ball. My current video camera is pretty small & light, so I'm guessing it would be ok. They might not work as well for a larger one. Interested to hear others' experiences.

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russell_bynum

I'm looking specifically at a brake cover or other mount with a small arm and simple camera-mount ball.

 

I've used the RAM mounts for other stuff, and they're quite good.

 

My concern with using them as you suggested for a camera mount, is something like a reservoir cover mount would put the camera way off the centerline of the bike, way up high, and the camera would turn with the bars instead of with the bike.

 

That's not to say it wouldn't/couldn't produce some interesting angles and shots, but I don't think it is an ideal solution.

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This is a direct rip-off of David's idea. As a way of showing what we've done:

 

62671639-M.jpg

 

62671765-M.jpg

 

The only thing is our camera has an infra red remote, and the camera's pick up is in the front. So I haven't come up with a way to remotely control it yet. Need some sort of a way to fiber optic to the front of the camera or something. Ideas anyone?

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You left off helmet cam and wife shooting over your shoulder. The static mounts work O.K. but it gets pretty boring and the tilting get to be distracting during play back. Bike vibration is a problem also. I have done a lot of video work from my bike and snowmobile. You must have a way to edit the footage after shooting or it will be a turn off to watch. The lanc control on the hand grips help with wasting tape. Follow someone keeps it more interesting. Being able to add the stops and follow the action with a helmet cam or hand held adds a lot. Music tracks work magic with smoothing transitions from one shot to the next. If you can keep the intrest of non-bikers or sledders you know you have something good. wave.gif

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wife shooting over your shoulder.

The video from the couch would get boring REAL FAST! (She won't come anywhere near the bike. "That's the way, uh huh, uh huh, I like it! Uh huh, uh huh.")

Thought of helmet cam, but, in watching others', I find the head turning ("OOh, look, a squirrel!") distracting. I happen to love the lean of static mount. Ain't that why we ride straights, to get us to the next set o' twisties? I agree with the editing and music.

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  • 5 months later...
The only thing is our camera has an infra red remote, and the camera's pick up is in the front. So I haven't come up with a way to remotely control it yet. Need some sort of a way to fiber optic to the front of the camera or something. Ideas anyone?

 

A strategically placed mirror at an angle maybe...?

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