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Tire puncture repair kit


Scott9999

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... or Tyre Puncture Repair Kit, for our friends on the other side of the pond. 😁

 

Anyhow, I was doing the dangerous Friday morning thingy, which is looking at stuff on Amazon (air gauges) after reading PastorJay's  "Correct Air Pressure" thread, and came across this nifty little kit on Amazon.

 

ARB 10000011 Speedy Seal 2 - Universal Heavy Duty Tire Repair Kit For Car, Truck, RV, Jeep, ATV, Motorcycle, Tractor, Trailer. Flat Tire Puncture Repair Kit Fix Punctures and Plug Flats 50 String Plug

 

It comes with about 50 repair plugs, plus every tool one might need to repair a tire, all in a nice extruded plastic box.  Which spurs a question I've had in my mind previously, but which I never really had an answer.  To wit: What are the rules for tire patching?

 

I know that any puncture through a side wall pretty much destroys any tire, i.e. can't repaired to make the tire safe.   I've also "heard" that these plugs are not considered reliable in a radial tire (i.e. if I take a radial car or truck tire to a tire shop, they usually dismount it and lay a patch across the hole from the inside).   I believe, though this has been years (actually decades 🙄😖) since I've dealt with one, that a ripped or torn tire, i.e. perhaps an inch or two, is unrepairable, as well. 

 

So, (a) I'm looking for feedback on repairing tires, and (b) what do y'all think about this kit?  I love the stout handles.  Generally looks like quality equipment.  I've always been meaning to get something like this, about every time I have a tire puncture (in Northern Idaho, with all the building, it seems like I have one every year, and usually at the worst time).  Not sure that this is compact enough to incorporate into a motorcycle repair kit, but I suppose it could be condensed into a small carry bag for that purpose.

 

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Edit:  Upon further review of Amazon feedback on this item, while this kit has something like a 95%, four or five star rating overall, there is some feedback that the "robust" tools I described, were weak or bent easily during actual use.  So, buyer beware.  Feel free to add your own kit recommendations, as well!

 

Edit #2: (Honestly, this is the last edit!).  Seems like the reason all of these similar kits have a set screw on the handle, is that one can buy a separate, much better quality reamer to replace the one that comes with it.  So, the set screws (a) make the tool upgradeable/fixable and (b) create an additional failure point, i.e. you can insert the reamer or plugging tool into the tire, pull out, and the tool separates from the handle.  If you're working in the garage, one of those reaming bits with your electric drill is the way to go, seems much easier and more thorough than a hand reamer.  (BTW, that's the down side of stuff on Amazon.  You can find 200 of the similar, even same item under different package, like all from the same Chinese factory.  However, separating the wheat from the chaff, so to speak, is a monumental job, when so much poor quality junk in listed on Amazon. /end rant).  

 

 

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Scott...this is similar to an oil thread.  You will get a lot of opinions.  Some of the ones I've seen posted here is, pull the tire and do an internal patch, just plug it and ride it until it wears out, plug it to get home then go buy a new tire.  There are some here that say after a plug done right, they ride them until the tire is worn out.  The one thing everyone seems to agree on and is pretty common sense; if sidewall damage replace the tire as nothing will hold.

 

I had my first on the road flat about 6-8 months ago.  A piece of steel went through the tire near the center.  The dash started going crazy with lights.  It was flat in less than 30 seconds. I was miles and miles from anyone or anything. I had my trusty Newley  tire plug kit with me.  I followed the directions, plugged it, aired it, and rode home (about 100 miles).  The next day I had new tires put on.  It was probably fine, but for me tire is a pretty important item, so I just replaced both.  If I had it to do over again, I would do the same thing,

 

The one tool I didn't have with me was a knife to cut the plug clean.  I did my best with dikes, but there was a little sticking out.  By the time I got it home it had worn smooth.  There is one thing I recommend adding to any plug kit.  A PVC Tee to help you push through the plug into the tire if your reaming tool is shaped like the handle on a screwdriver.  In the kit you listed above you wouldn't need it due to the shape of the handle.

 

1/2" Schedule 40 PVC Tee Threaded, 405-005

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3 minutes ago, Skywagon said:

... The next day I had new tires put on.  It was probably fine, but for me tire is a pretty important item, so I just replaced both.  If I had it to do over again, I would do the same thing, ....

 

I'm pretty much of the same mind.  My tires (until I tried the original PS1's or PS2's) routinely lasted maybe 5K or 6K miles, anyhow, so the down side of replacing a "good tire" was usually not that bad.  Patching a tire on an 4-wheeled vehicle, with 3 extra wheels to spare, doesn't seem as high a risk (plus, I hate to replace on tire at a time, unless I have to, and the cost to replace four car or truck tires?!).   On a bike, you've got only two tires keeping you from the pavement, and I want the law of averages to favor my survival at all times - yeah, just replace 'em.

 

Your comment on differing opinions, well, that's why my mind's never been settled on the issue of tire patching.  🤣  I like black and white, true or false, and tire patching seems to fall into the relative area of an "art". 😏

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51 minutes ago, wbw6cos said:

Well, there is tire plugging and tire plugging/patching combo.

Lol, that doesn't look like a tire that he's patching.  Not even a bicycle tire or inner tube.  Very weird advertisement.  (Hmm, they even have two, 3-year old reviews, which I assume are from the owners of the company.  This thing can't possibly work on tire repairs.) 

 

re:  " Use To Repair Tire Injuries"

 

What part of China-America calls tire punctures "injuries"?! 🤣🤣🏆

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Your original post indicated you wanted to know about that kit.  I do not have any knowledge about that item.  I figured that I would give you another option to consider.   What I posted was just the brand that I bought.  I have had if for a few years and have used one once.   I also have some vulcanizing rubber cement.     My original intent for buying these was in case the tire plug (rope) will not work due to the puncture.

 

I carry tire plugs (rope), a reaming tool, insertion tool, rubber cement, foldable razor, and a Slime Pump (thanks Bob!!).  Oh, and a cell phone and a credit card in case I fail to stop the air leak.  HA

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1 hour ago, wbw6cos said:

Your original post indicated you wanted to know about that kit.  I do not have any knowledge about that item.  I figured that I would give you another option to consider.   What I posted was just the brand that I bought.  I have had if for a few years and have used one once.   I also have some vulcanizing rubber cement.     My original intent for buying these was in case the tire plug (rope) will not work due to the puncture.

 

I carry tire plugs (rope), a reaming tool, insertion tool, rubber cement, foldable razor, and a Slime Pump (thanks Bob!!).  Oh, and a cell phone and a credit card in case I fail to stop the air leak.  HA

I'm sorry, William, if it seemed like I mocked you for purchasing the product.   I'm glad that it worked for you when you needed it.  I was just responding to the vendor's advertisement, and I guess after browsing 200 Amazon (and other) ads today, I was a little bit short tempered about it (as my final comment in my original post also indicated).   Thanks for your feedback!  All good?

 

What you're carrying is better than what I currently have, which is.... um ... nothing. 😞  

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Well, that tire plug/patch combo cannot be used roadside unless you can dismount/mount the tire as one would need to access the inside to affect repair.

 

A lot of the forum members carry similar repair kits, but without the hard case.  In fact, quite a few even take the case off their air compressors to minimize the space it takes up in top case.  You may find it easier to get all the items you need from the auto parts stores and carry in a zip lock bag.

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William...thats a pretty clever looking patch/plug.  Have you ever used one?  Curious how well they work.  I also carry a slime pump. I've been carrying it for at least 15 years.  I used it once six months ago and it worked great.  I wrote slime and asked them about getting a new one for another application.  Those rascals sent me a newer version for free and said enjoy.  I think it was a return as it was uncoiled, but it works great too.

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2 hours ago, wbw6cos said:

Well, that tire plug/patch combo cannot be used roadside unless you can dismount/mount the tire as one would need to access the inside to affect repair.

OHHH, I see now.  I expected it was an outside the tire patch.  :4607:

 

I can see how that might work well.   Pulling a tire off a Beemer roadside ain't fun, but it's entirely doable.   In that situation, however, I'd probably prefer to plug it and take my chances, than R&R the wheel from frame, tire from wheel, and the rest of that work.

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David,

I believe I used one for my R 1200 C rear tire, which took a 3" hex bit driver.  I tried plugging with 2 ropes and it still leaked air.  The tire was 50%, so I figured I would try it before getting a new one.   I  recall reading about those on one of these forums.  The best part about it was that I was able to put it in by only removing one side tire bead; it was tight, but a 2 x 4 block worked as a spacer.   The  repair spot was in a tread groove and worked pretty well.   It must have been a good repair because I forgot about it until I read this thread.    

 

The box came with 25.   I do not run a tire shop so I hope to hell I do not need to use them up.  :ohboy:

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Like many on this forum, I like the Nealey kit. They are strings but a different material from regular tire strings. Nealey claims they they are a permanent patch.

 

Not sure if Nealey is still in business but the same strings are also available from Chemi Cure.

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Nealey is definitely the best kit to throw in the side case.  I think three of the four tires on our hooptie Ford Ranger have Nealey plugs and ive plugged a few motorcycletires as well. That said for now they are not available as the owner retired. The website states the business was sold but should be back online soon. 

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23 hours ago, Scott9999 said:

 

 

 

 

ARB 10000011 Speedy Seal 2 - Universal Heavy Duty Tire Repair Kit For Car, Truck, RV, Jeep, ATV, Motorcycle, Tractor, Trailer. Flat Tire Puncture Repair Kit Fix Punctures and Plug Flats 50 String Plug

 

It comes with about 50 repair plugs, plus every tool one might need to repair a tire, all in a nice extruded plastic box.  Which spurs a question I've had in my mind previously, but which I never really had an answer.  To wit: What are the rules for tire patching?

 

I know that any puncture through a side wall pretty much destroys any tire, i.e. can't repaired to make the tire safe.   I've also "heard" that these plugs are not considered reliable in a radial tire (i.e. if I take a radial car or truck tire to a tire shop, they usually dismount it and lay a patch across the hole from the inside).   I believe, though this has been years (actually decades 🙄😖) since I've dealt with one, that a ripped or torn tire, i.e. perhaps an inch or two, is unrepairable, as well. 

 

So, (a) I'm looking for feedback on repairing tires, and (b) what do y'all think about this kit?  I love the stout handles.  Generally looks like quality equipment.  I've always been meaning to get something like this, about every time I have a tire puncture (in Northern Idaho, with all the building, it seems like I have one every year, and usually at the worst time).  Not sure that this is compact enough to incorporate into a motorcycle repair kit, but I suppose it could be condensed into a small carry bag for that purpose.

 

Morning Scott

 

That kit is kind of a neither good or bad, but it REALLY depends on what you want or need it for. 

 

It's too large to easily  carry with you on your motorcycle & not the best for permanent tire repairs around your property or for long term tire repair.  

 

Patch/plug or proper internal patches are the best for permeant tire repairs or high speed tire repairs but not really usable while out on the road riding. Mushroom type plugs are better for a somewhat permanent repair but difficult to use road side and they usually have problems sealing in ragged hole punctures or tire cuts. 

 

You sort of need to define your requirements, for local (at home or close to home) tire repairs then removing the tire from the rim & using a proper patch or patch-plug complete with buffing the tire's internal area where the patch seals is best & can give you a lasting repair that will run to end of tire life. 

 

On the other hand if you cut a tire in the middle of nowhere (especially at night) the best internal repair in the world won't help you plug that ragged hole without removing the tire from the rim (about impossible road side at night). 

 

So what are you looking for? Or put another way, you probably need both types. 

 

The other thing to think about is how fresh are the patching/plugging components going to be when you need to use them  (typically the glue part is probably getting pretty bad after carrying for a summer).

 

Personally I don't carry a kit but do carry a sealed plastic baggie with rope type plugs & some fresh glue along with basic  hole prep & insertion tools that I replace the glue & rope plugs a couple of times a riding season.  They are not the best for a long term repair (but I have at times rode a rope or string type repair to full tire life). But I have found over the years that rope/string type are the best for getting a leak-free repair in those odd-ball tire cuts or irregular punctures. 

 

For simple nails or screws in the tire I can usually  just use my 12v air pump to keep the tire inflated then ride on until I get to destination (or to a place that I can make a full repair).

 

For at home or around my property I do have a number of tire patches/plugs/ patch plugs but seldom use any  of them as I prefer to just go buy new (fresh) so I get the best longest lasting repair possible. 

 

A number of riders in my normal riding group carry the Nealey kit & that usually does a decent job of on-the-road tire repair. I have a few times had to add a couple of my smaller string plugs to their Nealey repair if the hole/cut was improperly prepped or the  Nealey repair leaked (usually that tire is unless after the trip anyhow so we just keep shoving it strings to keep it sealed &  get to destination).

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, dirtrider said:

A number of riders in my normal riding group carry the Nealey kit & that usually does a decent job of on-the-road tire repair.

Just FYI, looks like Mr. Nealey has retired, and either closed or sold his business.

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16 minutes ago, Scott9999 said:

Just FYI, looks like Mr. Nealey has retired, and either closed or sold his business.

Afternoon Scott 

 

A couple of the riders that I ride with carry a Stop & GO tire repair kit. I haven't ever used one but the riders that use them seem to like the Stop & Go. I'm not sure what one they have but most of us in my riding groups keep the motorcycle carried tools/parts/kit to the bare minimum so it would probably a basic kit. 

 

Added: a good way to understand a tire plugging system (like the  Nealey  or  Stop & Go is to practice plugging a worn motorcycle tire (on the motorcycle) just before replacing that tire. That way the first time you use it won't be on a good tire a long ways from home. 

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14 hours ago, Scott9999 said:

Just FYI, looks like Mr. Nealey has retired, and either closed or sold his business.

The same strings and tools are available from Chemi Cure. According to a post on the MOA site, Chemi Cure made the kits for Nealey.

 

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7 hours ago, Dave_in_TX said:

Last time I searched, Chemi Cure was available on multiple sites but the one above looks good.

yep, stupid me thought that this was the Chemi Cure web site, I should have realized that this was just a tire products vendor.  Ignore that post.  You can get this stuff anywhere, and maybe for a lot less. 

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1 minute ago, Scott9999 said:

yep, stupid me thought that this was the Chemi Cure web site, I should have realized that this was just a tire products vendor.  Ignore that post.  You can get this stuff anywhere, and maybe for a lot less. 

The site you found is a good one, I just wanted to point out that it was available elsewhere.

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