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Long Distance Ride Tips


MichiganBob

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Good Afternoon,

 

I looked for previous threads on long distance ride tips and did not find anything. I'm wondering what your advice is on completing the long haul, not only in one day, but also consecutive days.

 

Many thanks.

 

Michiganbob

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What type of specific information are you looking for? I have ridden long distances of up to 700 miles in one day and 2500 miles is 4 days and how I have done it may not be the same as others. I also don't do this every year as compared to others. I will say that when I do it I try to break up a long day by making sure I stop for maybe 20 minutes or so, probably when I get gas or every 1.5 to 2 hours. This seems to keep me fresher. Also, make sure you carry water and some kind of energy bars. Also, ride with good riding gear, that is, good air flow for the summer rides and warmer gear for the fall and winter. Don't ride if you feel cold or to hot, get off and rest for until you feel good to go. I am sure that you will receive more recommendations on how to make longer rides. 

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52 minutes ago, MichiganBob said:

Good Afternoon,

 

I looked for previous threads on long distance ride tips and did not find anything. I'm wondering what your advice is on completing the long haul, not only in one day, but also consecutive days.

 

Many thanks.

 

Michiganbob

Evening Bob

 

Define what kind of trip that you are planning?

 

All motels, all camping, both combined?  Max miles per day or sightseeing (or both?).

 

What do YOU need for comfort? 

 

What do you need to have when you reach destination?  Just turning around & returning home or planning on staying at destination for a while?

 

Must haves are a cell phone, credit card, Comfortable seat, did I mention a Comfortable seat? GPS is handy & makes the trip easier to navigate while riding.  

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1, sell off any needy children, pronto.  :classic_biggrin:

2, LD Comfort Shorts

3, some form of riding hydration system. 

4, a light exercise routine a few weeks prior to departure and some stretching before and after the days ride.

5, IIRC, you’re working on a seat fix...;)

 

Solo, or with a riding partner? It’s good when you have the same attitude about your journey and similar riding styles.

 

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Great suggestions so far.

No matter where, when, or for how long I ride, I find that having some Aleve (or pain reliever of your choice) with me is always a good thing.

I used to be young and tough... :old:

 

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Good Evening,

 

Thanks for your input. I want to do a SaddleSore 1000 this Spring. I know, I know, why do it at 72? What are you trying to prove? You're too old. Blah blah blah. If I was rationale, I would not have ridden a motorcycle regularly since 1968. I've been craving that plastic IB member license plate holder and want it bad. I've been on a few 400-500 mile trips these past few years and it always blows my mind that I'm only half-way toward a SaddleSore 1000. So I need some suggestions on how to get the other 500 miles done. Anyone do these high mile trips? What have you learned? What works for you?

 

Many thanks,

 

Michiganbob

 

 

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I’m too lazy to do the whole Ironbutt process, but I’ve ridden 1,000 miles—plus in 24 hours at least a half dozen times and have done many 700-800 mile days. A few thoughts:

-Ride fast, but not stupid fast. Extreme speed kills your fuel consumption and is mentally tiring. 

-Hydration and attention to hyper/hypothermia are probably the most important aspects of doing high-mile rides.  Getting overheated is extremely dangerous, and getting too cold robs you of coordination and brainpower.  

-Ibuprofen is your friend. I take a dose every four hours, and it’s a huge help in avoiding painful inflammation.

-Even if you have greater fuel range, stopping and stretching every three or four hours is immensely helpful; doing this can help you hit the big numbers more easily and safely than going for extremely long stretches without a stop. Hydrate during those stops.

-It’s relatively easy to hit 1,000 miles in 24 hours, while still giving yourself a relatively long stretch of overnight sleep. If you’re not used to it, riding through the night is risky. You can likely get in a five or six hour stretch of overnight rest and still hit 1,000 miles, as long as you don’t screw around with the remaining hours of wakefulness.

-Probably most important: don’t feel as though you have to prove anything to anyone. If you get to the point that you’re dog-tired and losing concentration, getting dehydrated, or having trouble making decisions, you need to stop. The plate frame is cool; getting home alive is cooler. 

 

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Years ago rode from Columbus, ohio to Houston, tx in one stint which was over 1100. Yes I was much younger, but I don't look at the full 1000 miles I take it one gas stop at a time, stop for minimum time, drink something, take aspirin to keep muscles relaxed, and maybe eat an energy bar. The main thing I believe at our age is to prepare, that is, do stretching exercises for legs, arms, etc., then do some strength exercises for the legs. Also I would say try to do this when the temperature are mild, say lows in the 60s and highs in the mid 80s. I say this as I don't know what type of gear you have. The last 200 - 300 miles will probably be still a grit your teeth ride as your butt gets sore, at least mine did. Good Luck! 

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I just ordered my first RDL. This is my 6th Beemer and I have never had a custom seat. I used Alaska Leather and Airhawk in the past. From what I've heard, the RDL is going to help.  It's also time for some new LD Comfort Shorts, current pair is 15 years old. 

 

I'm thinking of all interstate. Kalamazoo to Marshall on I-94, I-69 to Indy, I-70 to St. Louis, I-64 to Louisville, I-65 to Indy, and then I-69 and I-94 again and home sweet home. It seems a lot easier and safer. Might do it on a weekend when there's less traffic, maybe leave at 4 am in May or June,

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A little knee pain but a few hundred steps takes care of that. More just plain tired. I've been reading that I need to cut down on the caffeine on these trips. I usually have coffee at every gas stop or two, It might be counterproductive -- at least that's what most of the hard core IB folks say.

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I break the ride into legs punctuated by planned gas stops and a meal stop (or two) so the ride distance to go is only to the next planned stop. Sometimes late into a ride I dig out of the tank bag a mint or piece or candy to enjoy only after a set amount of miles is behind me, say like 25 or 50 more miles. I spend a fair amount of time beforehand route planning and Google looking at where I'm going to stop. Know your expected mpg & tank range and plan gas stops with plenty of cushion instead of stretching to make the leg, particularly with SS1000s where we usually have plenty of extra time. If running on a road with limited fuel stops it might mean two short legs of 100 and 150 miles instead of trying to stretch one to 250 miles, example using a bike of with a safe range of 250 miles. Traffic conditions or wind might cut into mpg and make that 250 mile leg a nailbiter. Truck stops and travel plazas are least likely to be closed, have plumbing problems, or be out of gasoline plus I know the physical layout of the highway exit or intersection. Plan and execute. The IBA site has a suggested ride log to use or make up your own and fill it out every stop and put the receipts in a zip lock bag or zipper file. A SS1000 is relatively easy to do within the time limit but don't waste time. IBA rides are exercises in time management. My first SS1000 was 22 hours and I did some things all wrong such as not following much of a plan, riding too fast on too many small two lane roads, and it rained. After that one they ran a much smoother 16 to 18 hours.

 

This is just me talking but I make a point of prepping and completing at least one SS1000 on every street bike I've had since 2006. R1200RT, ST1300, NC700X, Tiger 800, Goldwing. I can't really say that one was better at it then the others, even seats (stock, Sargent, Russell) and wind management didn't come into play. The common thing was ability to hydrate and snack in the saddle and a mental attitude that I was going to have fun doing it.

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A good seat and windshield are paramount. Wind fatigues you slowly but surely. Stretch breaks and hydration are also key. Time of year is crucial...100F degrees and 80% humidity isn’t the time to do this at our age. Good luck. 

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On a few longer rides where the destination was the point I’d play the hundred mile game in my head. Meaning every hundred was an achievement. I guess that broke it down into more manageable bites IYKWIM.

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Buy a K1600, either flavor depending on your taste.  Send the seat off to Russell.  High end radar detector.  You are ready!

 

I've done one official Saddlesore 1000 ( RT) and finished a Iron Butt rally called  The Void on the GT.  Numerous 700 mile days as well.  Great advice in the thread, for me, a means to stay hydrated is most important.  I have a MotoJug that works great.  

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Lots of good suggestions, including the reference to the IBA site for many, many articles on the topic.  

 

One suggestion -- don't eat a large lunch or dinner -- that will just make you want to take a nap.  Eat a piece of fruit or some trail mix to keep your energy up but not tire you out.  And don't forget to save your gas receipts!

 

 

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John Ranalletta

Two personality characteristics have much to do with long haul trips of any kind:  Introversion vs. extraversion & patient vs. impatient

 

I tend toward extroversion and impatience; so I tend to enjoy multi-tasking and in social environments.  As a result, I need something to break up the boredom, like listening to a book while riding, setting distance or mileage goals to occupy my attention.  Definitely need to break up the trip or get it over with ASAP.  It explains why I prefer to tow to events rather than grind out miles on the slab.  In the car, I can make client calls, eat, listen to a book (bike, too) and create other distractions to break up the boredom that I can't do on the m/c.

 

A friend and rider is my opposite.  He is introspective and patient. He would be distracted listening to music or a book (and has said so); and, he can grind out the miles and hours without becoming bored with the process.

 

Understand yourself and what you need and then plan.

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I have found that music really helps get the miles to roll by. I haven't tried an audio book, but I can see that working too. I was of the "no motorcycle should have a radio" camp, but now that I have one, I think it's great. In fact, it needs an amplifier and better speakers! (I rarely wear a helmet, and don't have it set up for sound yet. Rock and roll!!)

Good luck on your run, I've been meaning to put together an "official" run one of these days. I think there is a 1500 IB in 36 hours? I've heard some say it's easier than the 1000/24.

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One more thing, check your tires of course, if they are worn, but not necessarily "worn out", it is probably best to change them before going, even if they "probably" have enough tread left on them. I'm sure you know this, but I've seen guys run tires way too long, trying to save money running a tire to the very end of its life, a subject that would fill a whole other thread.

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earplugs, but then again you should never ride without them

 

I stop at every rest area even if I just recently stopped for gas. always adds to my refreshment and I can check my bike again for issues

 

make sure you drink enough water

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1 hour ago, Hosstage said:

I think there is a 1500 IB in 36 hours? I've heard some say it's easier than the 1000/24.

That would be a Butt Burner 1500.  30 hours is the time.  Not too sure about "easier!"

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RecentConvert

I made a lot of mistakes during my SS1000.  Plan a simple route (which you seem to have done).  I made 14 gas stops to get receipts for documentation of turns etc.  Huge mistake!   Check the weather for your route.  I ran into 30 mph side winds on a 175 mile leg.  Stand, stretch, use the rear pegs, play with settings, listen to music, talk on the phone.

 

Use a GPS tracking app. " Ride with GPS"  is a cycling apps that works well by tracking your phone.  Start it at the very beginning and don't shut it down until finished.  Downside, it also records speed.    Very reliable as long as you keep the phone charged.  In the end the  IBA used that data and not the odometer and gas receipts as primary.

 

Follow Whip or Scout6 leaving Torrey for Grand Junction!

 

 

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Damn that hydration. Never been a big water guy but now I put a tablespoon of BCAA in my water jug and it increases my daily fluid consumption. For this SS1000, I'll do my usual long haul packing of my Camelbak in the top of my tank bag with the hose accessible on the side loop. Hopefully not too many pee breaks. Will pack some fruit, nuts, jerky, and extra water for this little trip. Some great tips here and appreciated. All I need now is the right mantra for those last 500 miles.

 

 

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1 hour ago, MikeB60 said:

That would be a Butt Burner 1500.  30 hours is the time.  Not too sure about "easier!"

That loss of 6 hours makes a big difference.

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9 hours ago, Hosstage said:

That loss of 6 hours makes a big difference.

A Bun Burner 1500 is 1500 miles in 36 hours, a Bun Burner Gold in 1500 in 24 hours. I've done both. The BB1500 allows a whole night's rest while a BBG is in the category of extreme IBA rides. The requirement of an overall average of 62.5 mph means a minimum of short stops on a bike with good tank range. Extreme IBA rides become a math problem. 80 mph limit = 18.75 hours but you can't average 80 with stops... the IBA might deny an attempt that the faster riding that an 80 mph average requires. 72 overall average is just under 21 hours. A 250 mile leg results in 6 stops. At 15 minutes a stop that's 90 minutes or 22.83 hours. That leaves just a 70 minute cushion. I'm proud of that license plate surround.

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10 hours ago, MichiganBob said:

Damn that hydration. Never been a big water guy but now I put a tablespoon of BCAA in my water jug and it increases my daily fluid consumption. For this SS1000, I'll do my usual long haul packing of my Camelbak in the top of my tank bag with the hose accessible on the side loop. Hopefully not too many pee breaks. Will pack some fruit, nuts, jerky, and extra water for this little trip. Some great tips here and appreciated. All I need now is the right mantra for those last 500 miles.

 

 

A tip someone gave me is to start drinking water a few days before and on the ride itself start drinking perhaps 5 pulls on the bite valve every 30 minutes - top and bottom of the hour. If this makes me pee before a gas stop then reduce to 3 pulls every 30 minutes during the next tank. The idea of course is to balance water intake with perspiration so that we don't have to stop to just pee but rather do everything during a planned gas or meal stop.

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Maybe that's the mantra I need. "Fatigued? Just be glad we didn't add another 500 miles to the day." Perhaps this realization would bring me joy. Amazing how we can trick our mind (sometimes).

 

 

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This has brought back some great memories. I remember seeing the IBA 50CC License plate frame in 2008 and asking what it meant. My initial thought was "that's impossible". I attempted the ride and mentally prepared myself for a 50/50 outcome.

I was not going to ride if I felt like I was pushing it and would rest when I needed to. I did use the IBA site and learned to completely get off of any stimulants ( especially caffeine ) a month prior to attempting the ride. I had my jacket pockets full of Beef Jerky and a camelback hydration system in my tank bag and some electrolyte crystals to add to water once I got into the humid states. I was astonished on how aware and alert I stayed with only water and beef jerky. I made 1000 miles in the first 14 hours so doing this in 24 hours is very doable but still quite an accomplishment. I stopped 2 times and slept for 3 hours and went from San Diego to Jacksonville Beach in 47:46... less than 2 days. I really don't think I could have done this without detoxing from caffeine first.

Another thing I remember doing was really enjoying each and every gas stop. Get off bike take off helmet, remove earplugs, restroom break and closing eyes for a couple minutes. Make sure you have a legible receipt, keep your records in the same spot every time. Get back on bike and repeat every 200 miles. The hardest part at the beginning was to figure out how much water to drink as I was stopping sooner than I had wanted the first 2 or 3 gas stops because I had to pee. Better to drink and be hydrated and need to stop more. Don't get dehydrated.

I also remember being in pain with my throttle hand developing blisters ( No cruise control ) and of course my ass was on fire after the first 1500 miles ( I did have a RDL too ) I did not take any advil or anything to relieve the pain.... I wanted to feel it as I was doing something that I didn't think I could do and I had earned that pain.

 

I think it is super cool that you are wanting to attempt this challenge. Just remember, it is no big deal if you don't achieve it on your first attempt either. Because the IBA doesn't even know that you are attempting the ride. You only submit your proof after you accomplish your goal.

 

BTW, I did my ride on May 20-21 and believe it or not I went from San Diego to Florida then back to San Diego Via Santa Fe New Mexico and not one raindrop hit the plastic of my 2004 R1150 RT. So I like the months of May or June that you choose.

 

Good Luck. I'm rooting for you wether you accomplish it or not.

IBA.jpg

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No two people are alike, you need to find what works for:  riding alone or with a buddy, ride every day before a big ride or don't ride for 30 days before a big ride, accept that each ride is different and be flexible, hydrating before a ride doesn't work for me (have to pee every hour or so), eat meals or regular snacking, etc....  With todays speed limits it's much easier to get sleep even during a SS1000 as opposed to our previously national mandated double nickel limit.

 

Go for it and find what works and doesn't work for you and, if necessary, tweak your efforts and go again or again.

 

Good luck and ride safe......

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14 hours ago, Bigfish said:

This has brought back some great memories. I remember seeing the IBA 50CC License plate frame in 2008 and asking what it meant. My initial thought was "that's impossible". I attempted the ride and mentally prepared myself for a 50/50 outcome.

I was not going to ride if I felt like I was pushing it and would rest when I needed to. I did use the IBA site and learned to completely get off of any stimulants ( especially caffeine ) a month prior to attempting the ride. I had my jacket pockets full of Beef Jerky and a camelback hydration system in my tank bag and some electrolyte crystals to add to water once I got into the humid states. I was astonished on how aware and alert I stayed with only water and beef jerky. I made 1000 miles in the first 14 hours so doing this in 24 hours is very doable but still quite an accomplishment. I stopped 2 times and slept for 3 hours and went from San Diego to Jacksonville Beach in 47:46... less than 2 days. I really don't think I could have done this without detoxing from caffeine first.

Another thing I remember doing was really enjoying each and every gas stop. Get off bike take off helmet, remove earplugs, restroom break and closing eyes for a couple minutes. Make sure you have a legible receipt, keep your records in the same spot every time. Get back on bike and repeat every 200 miles. The hardest part at the beginning was to figure out how much water to drink as I was stopping sooner than I had wanted the first 2 or 3 gas stops because I had to pee. Better to drink and be hydrated and need to stop more. Don't get dehydrated.

I also remember being in pain with my throttle hand developing blisters ( No cruise control ) and of course my ass was on fire after the first 1500 miles ( I did have a RDL too ) I did not take any advil or anything to relieve the pain.... I wanted to feel it as I was doing something that I didn't think I could do and I had earned that pain.

 

I think it is super cool that you are wanting to attempt this challenge. Just remember, it is no big deal if you don't achieve it on your first attempt either. Because the IBA doesn't even know that you are attempting the ride. You only submit your proof after you accomplish your goal.

 

BTW, I did my ride on May 20-21 and believe it or not I went from San Diego to Florida then back to San Diego Via Santa Fe New Mexico and not one raindrop hit the plastic of my 2004 R1150 RT. So I like the months of May or June that you choose.

 

Good Luck. I'm rooting for you wether you accomplish it or not.

IBA.jpg

I did mine the other way - from Jacksonville Beach to Ocean Beach, CA in 42 hours 30 minutes. I picked out Van Horn, TX to stop for the sleep break as it was 1510 miles from the start thus picking up a BBG1500 inside of the 50CC. I did mine the last weekend in July and it was over 95F for ~1800 of 2669 miles. Each gas stop in daylight I bought a 8 or 10 lb bag of truck stop ice, poured off or gave away about half and stuffed the remainder still in the bag in the top of my Aerostich. I went home from San Francisco through the Sierras, the Wah Wah mountains of west UT,  high Rockies pass Loveland, CO then I-70 across the plains, dropped down to I-40 and into the Smokies. 6500 miles in 9 days over and back. Dropped my iPhone at 75 mph somewhere in KS and when unsuccessfully looking for it I found a counterfeit $20 bill on the shoulder.

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  • 1 month later...

Long distance multiple day rides are great.  They can be a learning experience and a money saver, too, as after the third day or so you may conclude you don't need an aftermarket farm tractor replica seat after all.  You body has adjusted.  It's you, not the bike.

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All good inputs.   

Recap - everybody is different.  Have to hydrate even if riding in cool 70-low 80's temps.

 

One thing that isn't really discussed much.....develop a stretching and exercising routine for once every hour.  Spend 5-10 minutes.  I do yoga and can adapt many of the stretching exercises into a sitting position.  leg lifts....calf stretches - ankle rolls - cat and cow stretch....many out there.  This gives you something to do, gets your blood moving and it keeps you active which helps being alert and helps with the body and joints aches.

 

I also do an adaptive meditation while riding to keep my focus.

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12 hours ago, sbeec said:

All good inputs.   

Recap - everybody is different.  Have to hydrate even if riding in cool 70-low 80's temps.

 

One thing that isn't really discussed much.....develop a stretching and exercising routine for once every hour.  Spend 5-10 minutes.  I do yoga and can adapt many of the stretching exercises into a sitting position.  leg lifts....calf stretches - ankle rolls - cat and cow stretch....many out there.  This gives you something to do, gets your blood moving and it keeps you active which helps being alert and helps with the body and joints aches.

 

I also do an adaptive meditation while riding to keep my focus.

Over time, I've done more hydrating AND stretching during frequent stops, maybe every 40-50 minutes.  Climbing back in the saddle, I'm new again and super alert.

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I have a tendency to ride by the gas gauge, stopping when it says it's time, or when I really have to go to bathroom. This when riding alone. Not always a ideal, but, that's my gig. Unless extreme heat or cold, then I try to pay much better attention to my condition.

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On 12/19/2020 at 6:17 PM, Groanup said:

Great suggestions so far.

No matter where, when, or for how long I ride, I find that having some Aleve (or pain reliever of your choice) with me is always a good thing.

I used to be young and tough... :old:

 

I am allergic to NSAIDs, so I rely on acetaminophen. That said, after checking with my doctor, I tried Voltaren (diclofenac) which although an NSAID, is applied as a gel, rather than ingested. I have arthritis at the base of my right thumb, and it helps. 

 

Here are a few other suggestions:

  1. A small tube of water-based cortisone cream. A dab in each ear helps prevent earplugs from getting annoying after several days. Do not use a petroleum based ointment, such as Neosporin, as the lubrication will make it next to impossible to keep earplugs in place.
  2. A tube of Blistex, both for the lips and inside nostrils. LD riding in hot weather can really dry these out.
  3. Sunscreen for cheeks and nose. Even with a full face helmet, a lot of UV can get through the shield.
  4. A small container of baby powder, both for crotch and gloves in hot weather.
  5. Take breaks as frequently as possible. Getting off the bike and stretching is a good thing. My internal fluid tank needs to be emptied more frequently than the fuel tank of the motorcycle.
  6. In hot weather, I fold a bandana into a triangle, pour some crushed ice on it, then roll up and tie it around my neck. Lasts about 60 minutes before needing a recharge.
  7. A resealable package of glass wipes to clean faceshield. Remove bug splats ASAP,  before they harden.
  8. For really long rides, a scrubber sponge. Dead bugs can build up on the fork tubes, which can damage seals. Scrape the fork tubes at the end of each day.

Here is a link to my packing list for a 6-week trip to Alaska and back:   https://web.archive.org/web/20070502183524/http://userwww.service.emory.edu/~libssd/Alaska2006/packinglist.html

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thanks for your tips Selden and the attached packing list. It has some similarities to my Alaska trek list. It looks like you have read "Going the Extra Mile" by Ron Ayers which I have read as well. A good read.

 

Take good care.

 

MB

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On 12/20/2020 at 1:49 AM, 041100S said:

Years ago rode from Columbus, ohio to Houston, tx in one stint which was over 1100. Yes I was much younger, but I don't look at the full 1000 miles I take it one gas stop at a time, stop for minimum time, drink something, take aspirin to keep muscles relaxed, and maybe eat an energy bar. The main thing I believe at our age is to prepare, that is, do stretching exercises for legs, arms, etc., then do some strength exercises for the legs. Also I would say try to do this when the temperature are mild, say lows in the 60s and highs in the mid 80s. I say this as I don't know what type of gear you have. The last 200 - 300 miles will probably be still a grit your teeth ride as your butt gets sore, at least mine did. Good Luck! 

 

Half a lifetime ago, back in the 80's,  I used to regularly ride from my home town in England, to the South of France. Even with an hour on the ferry I could do the whole 960 miles in as little as 16 hours.:revit:

 

I don't recall any particular discomfort, but I kept a pocket full of toffees, that I could unwrap and pop in my mouth occasionally to keep sugar and energy up. I also used to sing loudly (and horribly) to keep myself awake if fatigue started setting in. :D

 

I can't do that sort of distance any more, though I did 500 miles in a day several times on rides in Europe over the east few years. The 'bucket' seat on my '97 1100r felt great on sub 150 mile rides, but anything longer than that and it was awful, it locked me in place, no room to wiggle or reposition. After the first trip, where I was in rear end agony for a  ten day tour, I hacked the seat around, made it flatter, and used an Air hawk inflatable seat pad. That made a world of difference. 

 

I generally ride for 100-130 miles then look for fuel, have a brief stop, then back on the road. The bike will do 200 miles on a full tank, but I like a break long before then as running out of fuel wont be fun. 

 

One thing I learned; don't drink lots of coffee with breakfast.... or I'm stopping every half hour to drain the snake. I stick to one small strong espresso when I'm out touring. :lick:

 

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday
On 12/19/2020 at 5:46 PM, Hank in WV said:

I find it's far less tiring on a long ride when wearing earplugs.

 

Earplugs all the time for me.  Howard Leight Max 33, the best you can get.  It means the music fidelity coming through my helmet speakers is less amazing, but the payoff is that my ears aren't ringing at the end of the day, and I'll have a stronger chance of being able to hear normal conversations 20 years from now.

 

The IBA's first tip - don't plan on a long sequence of high-mileage days - is a big one.  It's been a while since I crossed the Great Plains from here in Michigan, but ever time I did it, I made sure the first day was the longest, e.g. something like 750 miles the first day and then 500 miles the second.  

 

After that, comfort is key.  Being able to drink water on the go is helpful (I use a Camelbak), and so is having adequate wind protection for high-speed cruising, along with gear that's not too hot or cold.  Make sure your bike fits, e.g. seat is a good height, maybe you do or don't need barbacks.  Highway pegs provide another option for leg position while cruising.

 

If there's no traffic nearby, stretch while you're riding.  stand up on your footpegs, flex your legs/butt to get the blood circulating.  Dangle your legs straight down.  Stick your legs out to the side, and let the wind stretch them to the rear a bit.  Reach back and grab the rack with one hand, twist your upper body.  Repeat using other hand.  Lay down on the tank.  Try to kiss the mirrors.  Anything you can think of to move all the joints in your body, stretch all the muscles.  

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When I got my RT in 2010, my neighbor and I decided to take a ride to Deals Gap.  All in all, the day trip totaled roughly 700+ miles.  My preparation,.......fill up the bike.  We stopped once to fill up in Asheville, lunch at Deals Gap, made the loop to Cherohala skyway, a couple of short stops at the overlooks, but overall nothing of significance was done for a "long" ride.  I've done several like this and when alone, I only stop to fill up and am only stopped long enough to fill up and generally don't even get off the bike while filling up.

 

A few years later, I had to visit one of our facilities in Cullman, AL, 500 one way, stopped once en route for fuel, site visit the next day, after site visit that day, back on the road.  On the way back, I detoured it to the Highlands area for some more scenic travels.  Did a couple of stops for happy snaps, fuel and lunch, but no more preparation than I do for my one hour commute for work.

 

Each person is different and each person can handle different things.  I do wear ear plugs, simply because I want to save what I have left, but nothing out of the ordinary as far a prep goes.  I do listen to music, but I always have music playing.

 

 

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On 12/19/2020 at 8:11 PM, MichiganBob said:

Good Evening,

 

Thanks for your input. I want to do a SaddleSore 1000 this Spring. I know, I know, why do it at 72? What are you trying to prove? You're too old. Blah blah blah. If I was rationale, I would not have ridden a motorcycle regularly since 1968. I've been craving that plastic IB member license plate holder and want it bad. I've been on a few 400-500 mile trips these past few years and it always blows my mind that I'm only half-way toward a SaddleSore 1000. So I need some suggestions on how to get the other 500 miles done. Anyone do these high mile trips? What have you learned? What works for you?

 

Many thanks,

 

Michiganbob

 

 

did a saddle sore 1000 on a road king, stock, no problem, it was comfy.  50cc on my RT east to west in 46 hours and change with a stop, comfier.  

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After decades of riding in Colorado and northern Arizona throughout the year, I've learned the importance of staying warm. I use my heated jacket whenever the temps are likely to remain no higher than 60-65 degrees throughout the day, not always turned on. I find I can maintain my energy and alertness much better, especially with temps in the high 40's and 50's, when most riders would probably not feel the need. Probably less advantage when riding shorter distances...200-300 miles, but when on  the bike for 8-10+ hours a day, it makes all the difference. It also enables the "200 miles before breakfast" approach, which needs an early start.

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Yep, by the time you know you are getting cold, there is NO WAY to get warmed back up!

Easy enough to stay warm enough for a couple hours, after that is the real test. 

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3 hours ago, lawnchairboy said:

did a saddle sore 1000 on a road king, stock, no problem, it was comfy. 

First saddle sore 1000 on a stock Ultra Classic. Quite comfortable, but man did that thing eat gas at higher sustained speeds.  Later long distance rides on an RT, but the comfort level was about the same, albeit with greater range and a non-vibrating GPS.  Also easier to take a nap on the RT when you put it on the center stand and dropped your head onto your crossed arms on the handlebars.  That is not doable on a leaning HD.

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