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The most difficult tire removal


Rougarou

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Yesterday, it was time to change the rear tire on the RT.  Not quite to the threads like I normally do, but just about,....also, the bike was feeling a wee bit squirrely in the low 90s.

 

Anyway, as I typically do, I place the tire/wheel in the sun to warm it up.  Since yesterday was "cool", I placed it on the hood of my beater '89 K1500.  I left it up there for a few hours and then commence to removing the tire.  No joy, none, could not stretche the bead over the rim.  What typically takes less than 30 minutes for two wheels, continued for a few hours.  I fired up my cabinet heater and placed the wheel/tire in front of that for some time, rotating front/back.  Rubber was hot to the touch on both sides, should be pliable right,.....nope, not at all.  I ended up having to cut the tire off.  What a PITA!!!  I've changed a'plenty and this is the first I couldn't just wiggle off.

 

The replacement went on just fine, ugh.

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I was gonna try my best Mr. Peabody impersonation to try and explain / blame the angle of the December sun for the hood trick fail, but dammit, it’s hard to even fake smart! :classic_biggrin:
 

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I do like the failure is not an option, mentality though! :yes:

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I thought about making a video during this as a "this is how I do it", but, I'm glad I didn't cause some sensitive ears may have heard alot of CSer's, MFer's and stuff, as well as tools that take unexpected flight.

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A friend changed the front tire on my F700GS (OEM Michelin Anakee), and complained it was the worst tire change he had ever done. Rear tire, no problem.

 

Out of curiosity: 1) What make/model tire? 2) What did you use to cut off the tire?

 

I assume the new one mounted without any significant problems.

 

Back in the day, before tubeless tires were the norm, I had at least a 50/50 chance of poking a new hole in the inner tube while remounting a tire — usually by the side of the road. 

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1 hour ago, Bluenoser said:

Is the tire a brand that you have removed without difficulty before?

 

14 minutes ago, Selden said:

A friend changed the front tire on my F700GS (OEM Michelin Anakee), and complained it was the worst tire change he had ever done. Rear tire, no problem.

 

Out of curiosity: 1) What make/model tire? 2) What did you use to cut off the tire?

 

I assume the new one mounted without any significant problems.

 

Back in the day, before tubeless tires were the norm, I had at least a 50/50 chance of poking a new hole in the inner tube while remounting a tire — usually by the side of the road. 

 

It was the rear, Dunlop Roadsmart III.  I had gone through two before, just odd that this one didn't want to stretch as I don't recall it being a problem going on.

 

On the 1250gsa, I've already changed the Anakee's once, that was without problems. 

 

The tire that I put on yesterday was the Dunlop Sportmax and went on without any problems.

 

 

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The 14" tire on the rear of my Burgman 650 is about the worst tire I've ever dealt with.  The small size plus the stiff sidewall (for a 600 lb scooter) means I have to use spoons to get the last bit of bead over the rim.  Next to that, real honest to goodness DOT race tires from Dunlop are the second.  Letting them sit in the sun makes them sticky-er, and the Dunlops have a very stiff sidewall to give maximum feedback for the rider.  Definitely a mount/dismount bar and one spoon to get them to go.  Regular 17" motorcycle road tires are a breeze compared to either one of those.

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Last spring I put new tires on my bike and had the same experience.

 

The irons just could not get it.  It was Michelin PR 4.  So I used a angle grinder to cut them off.   They call those things angle grinders, I think.   Basically it is just a large Dremel.  Of late I have found that there are people in this world what don't know what a Dremel is. 

 

I guess maybe the proper name is rotary tools.  I used a rotary tool.

dc

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7 minutes ago, Dennis Andress said:

I've found that scrubbing the inside of the wheel to remove any rubber residue makes a big difference.

 

It wasn't popping the bead, it was stretching the bead over the rim.........tire just would not stretch

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Dennis Andress

I have used a No-Mar for years. Their approach to getting the bead over the rim relies on lubrication instead of brute force. Bits of old rubber stuck to the inside of the rim screw it up.

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12 hours ago, Dennis Andress said:

I have used a No-Mar for years. Their approach to getting the bead over the rim relies on lubrication instead of brute force. Bits of old rubber stuck to the inside of the rim screw it up.

What do you recommend for lubrication? 

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Dennis Andress
22 minutes ago, Bernie said:

What do you recommend for lubrication? 

No-Mar's stuff is pretty good. Mix it 50/50 with water in a spray bottle to use when taking the tire off. Use it straight when mounting the tire.

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6 hours ago, Rockosmith said:

Ru-Glyde from NAPA is really good too.

 

I use the No-Mar paste for mounting and Ru-Glyde for dismounting.  I break the bead and follow up with a spray of Ru-Glyde around the bead of the old tire.  This keeps the bead from wanting to re-seal before I can shove the bead down all the way around the rim.  I follow the No-Mar procedure for the use of their paste when mounting.   

 

One other trick I use is to insert small wooden blocks shoved in around the bead to keep the tire in the recessed part of the rim.
 

 

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