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Tire Change


Rinkydink

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I replaced tires on my ‘17 RT Friday. (Bridgestone T31) My friend’s bike lift has front/rear drop out panels to facilitate removing wheels making it so easy. 
 

My lift has no drop panels. Of course the rear is a breeze with the single sided swing arm. How hard is it to remove the front wheel while bike is on center stand and flat surface? Is weighing the rear of the bike down sufficient or do you have to jack up the front a bit to get the wheel out? I do of course remove the calipers and ABS sensor. I have always paid someone to change tires for me but the $$ and inconvenience has finally forced me to try the self maintenance route when I can. Excuse me if this has been discussed many times b4. 
 

Thanks in advance. 

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3 minutes ago, Rinkydink said:

I replaced tires on my ‘17 RT Friday. (Bridgestone T31) My friend’s bike lift has front/rear drop out panels to facilitate removing wheels making it so easy. 
 

My lift has no drop panels. Of course the rear is a breeze with the single sided swing arm. How hard is it to remove the front wheel while bike is on center stand and flat surface? Is weighing the rear of the bike down sufficient or do you have to jack up the front a bit to get the wheel out? I do of course remove the calipers and ABS sensor. I have always paid someone to change tires for me but the $$ and inconvenience has finally forced me to try the self maintenance route when I can. Excuse me if this has been discussed many times b4. 
 

Thanks in advance. 

Afternoon  Rinkydink

 

On the front wheel, I first strap the center stand to the exhaust so the center stand can't collapse when working on removing the wheel.  

 

I also use a scissors jack under the engine as that makes precision front height adjustments much easier (if you just weight the rear then the  motorcycle can jump or quickly tilt when the front wheel weight is removed or added back to the forks.  

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Thanks DR. I did use a tie down on the rear of the bike and a scissor jack while doing the front. The drop out panel meant jacking it up just enough to remove the front contact patch to freely drop the panel down. I will use the center stand strap from now on. 

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When I am removing the front wheel, I put the bike on the centerstand, and then use a pry bar to lever the front wheel in the air.  I have a length of 2"x4" that I cut to fit between the engine case and the surface of my lift.  So, with one hand, I pry the tire in the air, and with the other hand, I slip the 2"x4" in place to block the the front.  Works like a charm.

 

If I am on my game, I remember to loosen all the bolts first, before jacking the front end up.  But, it's not really necessary.

 

Cap

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+1 on the scissor jack in front.  I have a little lightweight jack that I got from Northern Tool to change the sidecar tire on my Ural.  The Ural is long gone, but the little scissor jack remains and gets used for all sorts of tire changes and other chores.

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Boxflyer

 

That is a nice video and all.  I do think it seems you have never heard of a deep dish socket.  That is what I use to take off the muffler on my 2008.   With it, I didn't have to cut nothing. 

 

Like the others I have used the scissor jack under the engine to lift the front wheel.  But lately a handfull scissor jacks were bent and ruined and thrown away trying to use them on something heavier than they were meant for.  So I recruit a neighbor or other person to press down on the rear end while I put a large block under the engine. 

 

That holds the front end up nicely.

dc

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I put the bike on the center stand, no strap, use a floor jack to bump it up, pop the front wheel off.

 

If the wheel will be off for a long time, I'll put the axle back in, place a jack stand under and lower the floor jack.

 

I've left it on the center stand with no rear wheel and the jack stand under the front axle for a day once, but most times, it's just a few hours while I do whatever maintenance I need to do,.......or if I'm distracted.

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On 12/17/2020 at 1:30 PM, migrant said:

Bought this to raise and support the bike while it is on the lift. Use a cordless impact to raise and lower.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0196PAZ1S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Those jacks were not made to be used with an impact wrench, much potential for damage. You do not want the jack screw to break, no good. It's come up a few times on other forums.

Also, lube the jack screw to keep it from binding and wearing.

 

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