Jump to content
lather

Getting on centerstand with worn rear tire

Recommended Posts

lather

I have put about 4000 miles on my 2013 since I bought it in June. Initially I found it fairly easy to get on the centerstand. When I bought it it had plenty of tread on the rear tire but not so much on the front. So before a  3000 mile trip this September I put on a new front. NOw I find with a fairly fresh front tire and a well worn rear I cannot get the bike on centerstand without help. The help I came up with is a piece of 3/8 inch plywood under the rear tire. Raising the rear that much makes it fairly easy again.

Maybe my technique is a lacking. OPen to any tips. I am going to order a new rear tire but until I get it I am going to carry a square of plywood with me! 

Share this post


Link to post
9Mary7

If you have ESA then set the preload to the highest setting (2 helmets). Without ESA, turn your manual adjuster all the way up. (Your plywood spacer takes the place of doing this and is excellent BTW).

Once you have the bike as high on its suspension as it will go, step down on the center stand arm with your right leg while holding the pass grab rail with your right hand, and hold the left handgrip with your left hand. No need to pull back on anything, just use your right leg muscles to straighten up while maintaining a straight back and right arm.

Proper technique will send it right up onto the stand.!

You will also be able to leave the suspension alone once you get used to the technique.

( I've put an RT-P up with totally flat rear this way)

Share this post


Link to post
lather

Thanks, I forgot about the ESA! Your technique is the way I do it. Guess with my gym closed for so long I havre lost some leg strength.

Share this post


Link to post
dirtrider
15 hours ago, lather said:

I have put about 4000 miles on my 2013 since I bought it in June. Initially I found it fairly easy to get on the centerstand. When I bought it it had plenty of tread on the rear tire but not so much on the front. So before a  3000 mile trip this September I put on a new front. NOw I find with a fairly fresh front tire and a well worn rear I cannot get the bike on centerstand without help. The help I came up with is a piece of 3/8 inch plywood under the rear tire. Raising the rear that much makes it fairly easy again.

Maybe my technique is a lacking. OPen to any tips. I am going to order a new rear tire but until I get it I am going to carry a square of plywood with me! 

Morning   lather

 

To (somewhat) easily get that RT on the center stand without the plywood or extending the rear suspension you need to weigh-more & the rear of the motorcycle needs to weight-less. (THIS is the secret to the whole deal)

 

No need to eat more, or put lead in your pocket-- You can use your arm & leg muscles to both effectively weigh more & to the make the rear of motorcycle weight less.  

 

Start with left hand on left handlebar grip, & right hand on rear luggage rack rail, & right foot on center stand pedal, now lightly step on the center stand pedal (just enough to get the left center stand foot to touch the ground) NOW straighten the motorcycle up & step a little harder on the center stand pedal  until you get BOTH center stand feet  FIRMLY on the ground (motorcycle can't be leaning on only one center stand foot).  Rock the motorcycle a bit to verify that BOTH center stand feet are evenly on the ground. 

 

Now to the--  "YOU" weigh more & "motorcycle" weighs less thing--- At the VERY  same time as you step down hard on the center stand pedal, briskly  lift up as hard as you can on the luggage rack rail (this adds the motorcycle weight to your base weight as it removes some rear motorcycle weight. As you start to push with your right foot & lift with your right hand, slightly lift your left foot weight off the ground  so ALL your weight is now on the stand pedal.  If done correctly in one "brisk" smooth push/pull the motorcycle should move right up on the center stand. I have seen a 110 lb girl do this on a fully camping gear  loaded 1200RT  & make it look easy. 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
lather

Those are some good detailed tips that I can see will improve my technique, thanks dirtrider.

Share this post


Link to post
Rinkydink

Dirt rider is correct. A spotter is helpful here so you can throw all caution to the wind until you’re comfortable.  I personally push down on the center stand with all my fat boy weight more than pulling up with my weak right arm. When you get comfortable it’s just an all in one motion kind of thing and it becomes second nature. 

Share this post


Link to post
Skywagon

Lather.. every once in a while I’ll find the same problem. I’m big enough so that isn’t the issue. I stop and realize I don’t have the center stand centered. When I can’t I find I have the bike leaning left a bit ( not square on the stand) and or I am pulling sideways not straight back. When I correct those two things it comes right up

Share this post


Link to post
9Mary7
1 hour ago, Skywagon said:

I am pulling sideways not straight back.

Don't pull back.....That's why the bike leans left. The stand will bring the bike straight back with its leverage & design.

DR's description is spot on to how I was taught 31 years ago in Motor Officer school.

Share this post


Link to post
waynerd

The original post has some validity that seems to have been discounted in the subsequent advice (save for the ESA trick).  There is a difference in the lever point of the center stand when you have a "compromised" rear wheel, i.e. starting at a more acute angle to the ground.  I'm not sure I've ever been so observant to notice it on a worn tire, but it's quite obvious when you have to pop up the bike with a flat rear tire.  Yes, you can do it, but it does take a little more grunt.

Share this post


Link to post
dirtrider
12 minutes ago, waynerd said:

The original post has some validity that seems to have been discounted in the subsequent advice (save for the ESA trick).  There is a difference in the lever point of the center stand when you have a "compromised" rear wheel, i.e. starting at a more acute angle to the ground.  I'm not sure I've ever been so observant to notice it on a worn tire, but it's quite obvious when you have to pop up the bike with a flat rear tire.  Yes, you can do it, but it does take a little more grunt.

Afternoon Waynerd

 

Yes, flat tire is quite noticeable.

 

But I just don't see the big difference with a worn tire (at least a safe worn tire).

 

About- 10/32"= 5/16" new tire tread depth

 

Around- 2/32" = 1/16" worn tire tread depth 

 

Close to- 8/32" = 1/4" lower with worn tire. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
lather

I think in my case it may have been a combination of a newer front tire and an older rear tire. When I first got the bike it had the opposite, a worn front and a fresh looking rear and I had no trouble getting it n the centerstand.

At any rate setting the ESA preload to two helmets plus using the techniques siggested by dirtrider and 9Mary7 I got her up today with ease! :thumbsup: 

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...