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West_Coaster

My new to me 2012 RT

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West_Coaster

Hi, this followed me home today.

 

Its a 2012, 55k miles, very extensive service history, new tires, brake pads, recent tractive front and rear non esa shocks, super comfy seat, cee Bailey screen and a few other add-ons. Recently had service and is ready to go.

 

Took the long way home and had a 2.5 hr ride through the boonies. Nice uneventful ride, though it was about 92-95 degrees. 

 

Hope to put many miles and smiles on.

 

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TEWKS

That looks like a 5k, not a 55K motorcycle! :thumbsup: Nice, good luck with it! :clap:

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wbw6cos

Nice!

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6speedTi

I have a 2012. I don't recall that color blue available as OEM. I may be wrong but that is one nice looking RT. CONGRATULATIONS!

Enjoy.

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9Mary7

Congrats!! That is a sweet looking Camhead:18:

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BMW_Ken

Nice.  I have a 2011 RT that I have enjoyed immensely for 73k miles.

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MontanaMark

Beautiful ride! 

 

Same color as my 2013.  I've put on 10k since I bought it a year ago.  Trouble free.  I see the RDL seat, same as I had on my 99 RT.  Great seat.  I have a Mr Moto seat on the 2013 and at first thought it would be too soft, but I was wrong.  I like it even better than the RDL.  I have to admit to loving the ESA shocks and the cruise control. 

 

Happy riding!

 

Mark

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Yango

Very nice. Congratulations.

My 2013 that I picked up this spring. Only 7,000km (4,300mi). I’m absolutely loving it—I’m sure you’re going to feel the same about yours!

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West_Coaster

I've had my RT for over a month now and I thought I'd post my opinion of it. Going to do this as well after I've had it a year.

 

Engine: I was told to be careful as a 1200 is a lot of power for an inexperienced rider and I maybe should get a smaller CC bike to start out. Well, my experience is that the RT engine is very easy to control. It has very linear power and doesn't explode at some specific rpm into an uncontrollable frenzy. I haven't had any issues controlling the bike, the engine has the perfect amount of torque and HP for its size. What I have noticed is the high amount of braking it creates when you roll off the throttle. With twin 600CC pistons, the engine slows the bike down quite a bit if you close the throttle. I have had a few times where I didn't match the rpm when shifting and it immediately let me know to do better next time. I do wish it was a tad bit smoother at idle, but it's not even close to Harley territory. Seems very easy to work on, though I don't expect to do much other than oil changes and valve clearance checks. I don't like the oil check site glass, that seems very old technology and very easy to make mistakes. But since I've only looked at it once, it's not a big deal. I do like that I don't get any heat from the engine while riding or at a stop. 

 

Transmission: Yuck. Very clunky in the lower gears, embarrassedly loud when downshifting to 1st coming to a stop. Seems to shift OK, smoother as the gears progress. I've heard most bikes are like this and as long as it stays together I can deal with it. Very easy to service, I like that. The clutch is very smooth, however with it being a dry clutch and very expensive to change, I'm treating it like it's made out of glass. First gear seems to be pretty long, so it takes some slipping to get the bike going smoothly, but I haven't read of many people having clutch trouble. Not a big deal, my previous riding experience is kicking in and I'm one of those easy on the clutch people anyway.

 

Shaft drive: This is the second bike I've had with shaft drive and it's very similar though more refined. Shifting sometimes makes the suspension unload a bit, mostly when the shifts are not done very well. I do like shaft drive, less maintenance and more reliable, but it does affect the suspension more than a chain. 

 

Suspension: I have to admit I was a little disappointed to find my bike had the ESA removed and replaced with Tractive front and rear non ESA shocks. When I first rode it the bike was VERY floaty, it bottomed out a few times and had little rebound control. I am an avid off roader and have a lot of experience tuning suspensions and I at first thought the shocks may be setup very wrong, or blown. I did not get any documentation for the suspension other than the receipt, which showed the shocks were only 1 year old. I called the beemershop and spoke with the owner who went through what I had and how he suggested to setup the rear shock. Within a few rides I had adjusted the preload and comp/damping and now the bike rides very well. I am now a fan and am very happy that the previous owner spent $2K upgrading the suspension. On rides I can see that my bike handles bumps and potholes much better than my buddies bike. As mentioned earlier, the suspension does get upset with crappy shifts, but that happens very rarely. I like that I will be able to fine tune it for both 1 and 2 up.

 

Controls & Gadgets: At first all the buttons looked like distractions and I simply ignored them to keep my focus. The Nav kept nagging at me so I had it turned off most of the time. And why doesn't the Nav lock on the bike, I hope nobody walks off with it. After a while I had to sit down with the manual and learn the audio system, the wonder wheel is pretty cool. I mostly use a USB for music and play through the speakers, it's easy to use while riding. The BMW Nav is shit. Luckily the bike came with a cell phone holder and I'll never have to use the BMW nav system as it's years behind Google maps or other android nav apps. The adjustable windscreen is cool, but I haven't figured out if I like the wind in my face or not. I know I don't like looking through the windshield or my helmet visor, so I normally have it up where the air hits the top of my helmet to get air through the helmet vents. I don't think I've had my helmet visor all the way down more than once other than on the highway. I know sunglasses are not good eye protection, so I need to figure out what I'm going to do long term. Maybe goggles?

I haven't used the seat or handlebar heat, it's been 80-90° so far. There is a button next to the ESA that I have no idea what it does, maybe turn off ABS? I had to adjust the rear brake lever height, that was easy. The rest of the controls are good. One other thing I need to figure out is my body position on the bike. From riding motorcross while younger I have a tendency to keep my elbows up and that translates into holding the grips tighter than I should. I'm wondering if I should get handlebar raisers to help lower my elbows and raise my hands. When I purposely lower my elbows I can feel my hands relax on the bars. I try to let just one hand do the work through a turn countersteering, I know having 2 straight arms in a panic don't translate into more control in a panic turn. Need to figure out how to get my arms more relaxed.

 

Looks: Damn this is a good looking bike. The previous owner did a great job keeping it up and it looks great. I've had my bonding time going over the bike cleaning it and adjusting a few things. My only gripe is that I don't like the rear license plate area, looks a bit unfinished.

 

Overall I feel like I made a great choice buying this bike. I had some pressure to get a Harley as my riding buddy has one, as well as a few other friends. I'm now called the guy riding the "sissy" bike, but I don't give a $hit, I have a comfortable bike with modern abs brakes, smooth engine, good suspension, and good handling. I feel safer than I would on a hog. All of them that have tried it came back saying, wow that's a smooth bike and its pretty fast.

 

Let's see what my opinion is after a year. 

 

Note: I just read my post and it looks negative in some areas, not my intention at all. So far I love this bike and really can't think of anything I would call a negative other than the NAV. Just wish I could be riding it more.

 

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Hosstage

That's a pretty bike, glad you are enjoying it! Good feedback on your findings so far. Good call too ignoring all the buttons until you got comfortable with basic operations.

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dduelin

My only comment is the basic BMW box o rocks transmission will make you a very good shifter given time and practice. Most of us probably agree the transmission can feel clunky and 'agricultural'. The clutch pack rotates at engine speed and is fairly heavy unlike and compared to most bikes with a small diameter wet clutch and a gear set between engine crankshaft and transmission input shaft. The factors combine to have a lot of rotating inertia when matching gear speeds up and down so when you do complete a smooth snick-snick up or downshift the feel is very satisfying. Plus the transmission case is very light aluminum alloy and doesn't have to withstand demands of supporting the crankshaft and engine block so it rings like a crude tuning fork when the relatively heavy hard steel gears contained within slide in and out of place. A good BMW pilot can make smooth shifts and you will too and it will make you feel really good.

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West_Coaster

Dave, I've noticed that it's best not to dilly dally when shifting. Once that engine slows down that's when the noisy shifting happens, least that's what it seems to me. I try to shift quickly to match engine  speed with the next gear. 

 

Good points on the mechanics, it does make sense now that I think about it. Gearbox isn't hidden in the engine cases, large mass clutch, etc.

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dduelin

My first BMW was a 1981 R100 purchased out of curiosity in 2006. I quickly came to love that bike and when I got the opportunity to ride a new late model BMW at a dealer demo day I hopped on a new 2006 or 2007 RT. I was sort of dismayed that the transmission in the new bike felt pretty much like the box in the '81.The goal posts didn't move much in thirty years. It's just part and parcel of the design and now part of their endearing character. These are long lived transmissions though. My second BMW was a 2007 project bike with a cash register ca-ching noise in the transmission when shifted but the original box and clutch logged 190,000 miles before the failing input shaft bearing started making noises. An eBay transmission fixed that one up to sell and set me up for 2007 RT number two. Like you, the more I ride it the more I like it.

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Bernie

Good afternoon, @West_Coaster!

For the seating and handlebar portions, you may want to read and try the article that from RDFrantz.

Master Yoda's Riding Position

It has helped a lot of us to get comfortable on these bikes.

As for the transmission, do not lug the engine, compared to cruiser bikes/motors, these bikes enjoy higher rpms.

 

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West_Coaster

Took my wife for her first ride on the RT today. Was 100 degrees so we only rode 40 miles.

 

She was very nervous at first, but after 10 minutes she was relaxed and enjoying herself. She goes jetskiing and off roading with me, she's a trooper. 

 

We ended up with 2 questions after the ride.

 

She cannot figure out where to hold on. My jacket is smooth in back, nothing to grab, and she does not like the handles down on the sides of the seat. Those of you with a passenger, where do they hold on? 

 

Second, we will need an intercom soon. Time to read up on that.

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wbw6cos

THIS may be an idea on what to start looking for.  I do not use one as Laura uses the grab rail in the twisties.  Just a thought.

 

My Scuberth C4 helmet has SC1 Standard intercom built in, which basically a Sena product.  To be able to talk on a ride,  I bought Laura a Sena 20S to clip onto her Shark helmet.  At first, she used her earbuds, but the 20S came with speakers to tuck in the helmet ear recesses with no modifications to the helmet.  

 

You have asked, so others will add to the communication issue as they will have a lot more experience with intercoms than I do.  :thumbsup:

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Hosstage

I always prefer a backrest or trunk of some type to hold my passenger on. If no backrest, I worry about catching her off guard and having her slip off.

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West_Coaster
1 minute ago, Hosstage said:

I always prefer a backrest or trunk of some type to hold my passenger on. If no backrest, I worry about catching her off guard and having her slip off.

I forgot to mention I did add a backrest a few weeks ago, she loves that but end somewhere to put her hands that make her feel safe.

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wbw6cos

Oh yeah, I forgot to add that I have the BMW 49 L topcase, which makes a difference.

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dduelin

For safety sake she needs to find a comfortable grip on the luggage rack/hand rails. When she gets a start or gets a fright you don't want her tugging on you and creating unwanted control inputs.

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greiffster

I find the the smoothest low gear shifts happen when you preload the shifter with your toe, and it will slip into the next gear as you pull in the clutch and release. Quicker is better. 

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West_Coaster

As an update, I thought long and hard about what to do about my wife's fear of being a passenger and not having a spot to lock in or hold. I created several spreadsheets with my options, listed the pro's and con's, had friends review my data and gathered their opinions. I also consulted a lot of websites and studied the information I took in. 

 

And did nothing. :5147:

 

We've been out and about half a dozen times on 100+ mile trips and she's totally comfortable on the back now. She just needed some time and experience to see she wasn't going to mysteriously fly off or whatever. She uses the side grab rails on take off and slowdown, and a light hand on my hips while we are cruising.

 

We got this.

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West_Coaster
On 10/4/2020 at 8:19 PM, greiffster said:

I find the the smoothest low gear shifts happen when you preload the shifter with your toe, and it will slip into the next gear as you pull in the clutch and release. Quicker is better. 

 

I do have to work on my shifts, your right that quicker is better. I tried shifting faster and better matching the engine speed to the next gear and it definitely upsets the bike a lot less. I have to say that my RT has the worst bike transmission I've ever shifted. The first 3 gears are very clanky and loud up or down shifting, feels like they are 18 wheeler sized gears. I also don't like that 1st gear is so long, starting off going up a hill with a passenger requires some clutch work. That said, my buddies Harley is no better. Feels like the tranny was built to hold 1000 HP. On the flip side, I haven't read one thread with an RT transmission issue, so I guess I'd trade off some noise and clunks for a bulletproof gearbox.

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