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Ken Insley

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marcopolo

This was, indeed, shocking news. Ken just seemed invincible, such a fit, vibrant guy.  I first met him at START 2014, after I had moved to the U.S. I always will remember how welcoming he was at that first (for me) ART. He was an incredibly talented rider but, as others have said, humble at the same time. One of the more interesting conversations I had with him was not at a Spring, or Fall, ART, but at the Red Lodge, Montana, UnRally in 2016. I wandered over to the lodge bar with my friend, Tim, from Wyoming. There was Ken, by himself, enjoys glass of scotch. We immediately struck up a lively conversation. Tim, like Ken, is incredibly fit, so we talked about workout regimens. I, of course, figured that I could give both of them workout tips. I remember asking Ken about his workout routine. He then told me he worked out only two times a week, for a total of thirty minutes each time. When I heard that, I immediately ordered another beer, and we all had a good laugh. We will all miss his incredible contributions to this group, especially those wonderful routes, which were masterpieces. I can’t imagine the heartache that Nikki is now enduring. 

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Kinsley

Hi everyone this is Nikki.  Ken truly loved and cherished this group. Thank you to you all  for sharing your photos, posts and heartfelt words and special memories of him. They are a lovely source of comfort to this very devastated and shattered heart. Ride free my love!

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OoPEZoO

Damn.......I'm sad.  Many a good conversations were had with him at more locations than I can remember.  All were enjoyable, and he will be missed greatly.  RIP buddy

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ESokoloff

2020 is shaping up to be one of THOSE years.

 

I never had the privilege to meet the man. 
My condolences to those that knew & loved the man. 

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szurszewski

Nikki - 

My family and I are so sorry for your loss. :(

 

I believe the first time I met Ken was at START in 2017, but the first time I SAW him was a decade or so before. I think it must have been on Olympia ad - I know it was in the MOA mag and was when we lived in bush Alaska, so it must have been 2006 or 2007. I distinctly remember showing the ad to my wife and saying something like, check out the amazing jaw on this guy. He had a great smile and we both agreed he looked much more personable than most male moto models. Later, I remember knowing that Ken "from the board" was a model and photographer but I don't think I ever connected him to that ad in my head. 

 

Fast forward to 2017 and we - my wife, son, our two dogs and I - are on a long trip and get "invited" to detour to START. The night of the dinner my wife, Laura, wasn't feeling well and stayed back at our cabin. Ken came right over and introduced himself to me and Jeremiah just after we walked into the restaurant - it was plain that his welcome was sincere and we both felt immediately truly at home at the event. 

 

That night, getting back to our cabin, I said, Hey Laura - remember that one guy from those Olympia motorcycle gear ads? She said, The one with the amazing jaw? Yep - him. You should have come to dinner - you would have been sitting right across the table from him, and he's exactly as nice in person as seems in the pics. 

 

 

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Kinsley

Thank you for your kind sentiments and for sharing these lovely memories . He truly was a beautiful man inside and out :)

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TEWKS

Nikki, I'm very sorry for your loss. I met Ken a couple times at different events and he was just as everyone describes him. Ken would search out new faces in the crowd and if that happened to be you, he made you feel instantly comfortable. I also had a chance encounter meeting him on the road one time, he passed me while on the way to the Johnson City MOA rally. :) I think that was our first encounter actually, I recognized his white GS at the time from pictures posted. We talked a bit at sign-in and again he was truly interested in your story.

 

Belonging to this board, I often associate people with different parts of the country, Ken was definitely Mr. Southeast! :thumbsup:

 

When you're strong enough to do so, any information on what may have happened would be very valuable to others here. Ken was an accomplished rider and mistakes weren't in his playbook.

 

Again, so sorry to you and to all of the board members that were very close to him. :(

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Matts_12GS

I've been trying to write this for 2 days now. I'm just leveled by this. Ken was always one of the faces I enjoyed seeing at our events. He was a great friend, great collaborator when it came to building routes or helping to entertain our guests at events. He always had a smile and a warm greeting for anyone that showed up. I'll miss him. 

 

Rest well my friend, your work here is done. We'll meet again someday. 

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Huzband

Such very sad news indeed. I had the pleasure of meeting Ken at El Paseo in '06. We hit it off right away as I'm sure everyone did. I was always glad to see him at an event here or there. Last time was on a lunch ride with Bernie several years ago. Ken was on a separate ride but somehow we crossed paths at an intersection out in the middle of nowhere. A quick laugh & hand shake & we were off in different directions.

 

My heart felt condolences to his family & close friends.

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KDeline
14 hours ago, marcopolo said:

I wandered over to the lodge bar with my friend, Tim, from Wyoming. Tim, like Ken, is incredibly fit, so we talked about workout regimens.. I remember asking Ken about his workout routine. He then told me he worked out only two times a week, for a total of thirty minutes each time. When I heard that, I immediately ordered another beer, and we all had a good laugh.

We talked workouts every time we would meet up at events. Always without fail, are you still working out, me, apparently not enough if you're asking. He often talked of his, hmm, routine, got me convinced to try it for two months. Not the results he got. We would laugh, I would cry.....  He was a mutant, probably the first Xmen. I told and reminded him of that constantly after my failed attempt at his workout. He laughed but never denied it.....

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ERdok

Wow! So sorry to hear. What a great loss to us all. I've been part of this group, attending most of the Spring and Fall Southeastern events since 2008. Without exception, Ken always made me and everyone feel welcome. Condolences to all his "family" - I know the numbers are countless...

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John Ranalletta

I wasn't privileged to know Ken as well as many here, but was always happy to see and chat with him.  Several years ago, I told a young woman at our office that one of my riding friends was a male model.  She laughed until I showed her a few pictures of Ken from his modelling site.  She was awe struck and showed the pictures to other young women in the office to their "oohs" and "aahs".  A couple times later, when I'd meet Ken, I'd Facetime my coworker and Ken could say, "Hi".  He played along happily and she was thrilled.  Truly, one of the good guys.

 

FYI, the funeral home handling Ken's arrangements has posted this 

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Stir

I never had the pleasure of meeting Ken.  But you can tell a lot about a man and his character by how people remember him.  You can see he was someone you'd want to ride with.  God speed moto brother.

 

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Lone_RT_rider
2 minutes ago, Stir said:

You can see he was someone you'd want to ride with. 

 

He was even harder to keep up with. (insert fond memories here).

 

I've known and ridden with Ken for over 15 years now. We've broken bread in ATL at some fine restaurants, hosted events together, I've scouted routes for those events and in the early years we traded friendly jabs on a regular basis. He had a genuine investment in this board and it's people. Yes, he loved to ride but creating the routes as he did wasn't just for him, it was for us. He's led me down many a goat path and I've cursed him in my helmet more than once for it, but it was always with a smile. Through these routes, he gave us so many memories.

 

Once I followed him home from the Rubber Chicken event in West Virginia.  We left at about 7:30 AM, late for him because I can't get my lazy butt out of bed early.  We made up for it.  475 miles later with about 10 miles of total expressway, I was pulling into my garage.  It was 4:30 PM.... Ken continued on to ATL with another 3 hours of riding to do. He was as good of a rider as they come.  

 

This world was a better place with him in it. He is, and always will be missed. 

 

:(

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Joe Frickin' Friday
54 minutes ago, Matts_12GS said:

I've been trying to write this for 2 days now.

 

That makes two of us.  Ken was one of the luminaries of this site; I always enjoyed riding the routes he created for our events, and I always enjoyed seeing his smiling, cigar-smoking face in the parking lot when I pulled in after a long day in the saddle.  Had the pleasure of one fantastic ride with him between Maggie Valley and Burnsville many years ago, and despite my best efforts I was never able to get very far ahead of him.  :)

 

Sad to know that he's gone.  :cry:

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Richard_D

Nikki , Thank you for coming on here . It made me feel better . I bet I'm not the only one too. You are a brave strong woman. My prayers are with you. 

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Burt

I've been sitting here at a loss for words.  My thoughts and prayers are with Nikki.  I always enjoyed talking to Ken at our events.  As others have said, the big smile and cigar were always there.  I appreciated the time he put into setting up the routes.  They always made for a great ride.

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Indy Dave

Thank you for emailing photos - they are still coming in, and some folks have said they'll send some today. Please feel free to share what (via email for best resolution) you may have from Ceder Key, Unrally, ART's El Paseo, BRR, etc.  I'm beginning to piece together some things. Please PM me for my email address.

 

As I go through pictures, so many memories come flooding back - and they reinforce the core and foundation of the comments made here that illustrate Ken's persona. Just by being himself, he was setting a example and a high bar in all things he did. It came naturally to him and he had a quiet confidence in all that he did - yet he wasn't looking for the spotlight and in fact he preferred to avoid it. I have so many things I'd like to unpack and share about Ken that speak to what an incredible guy he was, most of them illustrate and re-enforce much of what has been said here. He was always positive, always looking to improve what we did with ART's, always looking big picture. Always thinking of others. And we had a project we'd been working on that illustrates this - something for consumption later. 

 

For now, let me just add some context to our relationship - something to keep in mind for what ever I may share going forward: Ken and I were were opposites in a lot of ways. That's probably not news for any of you who know us both. While I know I drove Ken crazy at times, despite my best efforts, he never once let on. When making ART posts, it was understood (and a joke between us) why I used this when referencing Ken :bike::bike:  and this  :ohboy::ohboy: when referencing me.

 

On 4/19/2020 at 4:25 PM, twistyguy said:

Hey brothers and sisters.

 

I just want to share some memories.  Please excuse me if this post is too long.

 

Ken was one of the most special people I've ever spent time with.  I didn't know him long like many of you--I've only been a member of BMW Sport Touring since 2016.  But I was drawn to Ken when one night I was lucky enough to be invited to dinner in Blowing Rock by Indy Dave and Ken was there.  We, of course, were talking motorcycles at dinner.  I was blown away with his knowledge.  He was NOT a show off.  The guy was plain smart--he didn't bullshit.  I was impressed and started to pick his brain so that I could get better.  Ken took riding SERIOUSLY.  He was humble--he didn't think he knew it all.  He took courses--a LOT of courses like Keith Code's California Superbike School.  He read all the books on riding--I remember him speaking so knowledgeably about Lee Parks Total Control riding philosophy.   I really respected that.  He understood the physics behind the technique.  You get a lot of opinions from a lot of people about motorcycling.  You just know when you meet someone who really knows what they are talking about.

 

When BMW Sport Touring printed business cards for us to give prospective riders who might be interested in the group, I was stunned by the picture on the card--it was a perfect picture in my mind--really--perfect.  It was taken in the peak of Fall looking up a beautiful twisty road next to a fantastic rustic barn.  Please excuse me, because, like all of us, I'm very emotional right now.  But that photo spoke to my soul.  It was perfect.  As a motorcyclist, the road was perfect.  The composition was perfect.  The colors were perfect.  I've never seen a shot that affected me like that.  I didn't even know who took it.  When I found out Ken was the photographer, I asked him if I could purchase it.  He gave me the link to his website where I bought it for....$1.00.  I couldn't believe it.  $1.00 for the greatest photo I had ever seen!

 

I asked Ken where the photo was taken--it was somewhere near Sparta I think.  He was gracious enough to offer to ride with me there during a START.  I was excited because I wanted to see his process--how he combined two of his greatest loves--motorcycling and photography.

 

We met in the parking lot that morning.  I distinctly remember him saying that he had to be careful because he hadn't ridden in a while.  I was impressed with that--he wasn't cocky.  Despite all his experience, he respected the danger of motorcycling.  So our kickstands were up at 0700 sharp and off we went on a wet, foggy  morning.  I thought I was an okay rider at the time.  I had taken Lee Parks course and had ridden at a FART and START and did okay.  Well, I was humbled.  Ken could ride.  On his camhead GS he just blew me away.  His lines were precise and confident.  He was such an efficient rider--from behind it just seemed it was effortless for him.  The conditions were very tough for me--visibility was terrible, the roads were slick with wet  debris and I remember being very tense.  Ken just flowed in front of me.  I was awed.

 

We came to the spot where the "perfect" picture was taken.  I was stunned--it was so disappointing--the barn was a dump, the road was ordinary.  I couldn't believe it was the same place that picture was shot.  It was then I realized how talented he was--he created a masterpiece from the ordinary.

 

We parked our bikes and then we discussed how to shoot the scene.  We decided it would be cool for me to ride up the hill and he could use an open exposure so the bike would be a blur of tail light whizzing by the barn.  It was fun.  The shot eventually became the background of a FART announcement on the website.

 

We continued to ride through DENSE fog.  I was hesitant and tense.  Ken left me in the mist.  We finally stopped for breakfast at the Pisgah Inn.  We discussed riding--it was there I learned how much Ken studied riding.  He would take courses whenever he could.  He never rested on his laurels.  He always strove to get better.  So impressive.  And he was so encouraging with me.  It helped me a lot.

 

After breakfast we continued to ride along great roads until Ken suddenly pulled over.  There was a farm with a great old house.  He parked his bike and opened up his custom camera box attached to his GS.  Out came the camera.  He took his time walking around to find the right angle, making adjustments to his camera after each shot.  It was fascinating watching him work. Below are some pics I took of him at work.  I was embarrassed using my lousy cell phone for a camera--sorry for the awful quality.  But for some reason I knew I wanted to shoot pics of him photographing by his motorcycle.  I'm so glad I did.

 

Thank you Ken for everything you did for us.  Your routes were other-worldly good--so precise and well thought out with different length options and excellent lunch stops.  Thank you for all the effort organizing START and FART.  Thank you for your amazing photography--I especially love the shots you took of members of the group next to their motorcycles in the parking lot--so great.  Thank you for sharing your amazing expertise in riding and route planning.  I am a better rider because of it.

 

To Indy Dave--I know how close you were with Ken.  You guys were a perfect team.  I can't even imagine what you must be experiencing.  We are here if you need us, Dave.

 

And to Nikki and Ken's family, thank you for sharing Ken with us--he must have put so much time into START and FART.  Our hearts go out to you for your tremendous loss.

We will dearly miss him.  He was a great man.

 

Peter

 

 

 

 

Well said! The conversation was very rich at dinner in Blowing Rock - as it always is at these events. Riders   talking   geeking  about riding, hungry to learn and improve. Ken made that dinner so rewarding, unpacking insights and observations. These kinds of conversations have always been a highlight of ART's.

 

Ken Insley holding court in Blowing Rock:

 

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As Peter said, Ken was SMART. But so are some other folks. What set Ken apart, was that he was smart about being smart - never coming off as a know-it-all or superior. Ken knew that sometimes leading one down a path of self-discovery is more teachable, impactful and lasting then just telling someone something.  And Ken had the grace to lead one down a path (towards something Ken already knew), and he was discerning enough to know when one could be told, and when one needed to be led down a path. He wasn't looking for the recognition that he knew something you didn't or something you should have known. Letting one discover or have a "ah-ha!' moment takes time and effort. Ken was willing to put the effort into this when needed; when it would have been much simpler and faster to just make a point and let the chips fall where they may. While this illustrates Ken's thoughtful understanding of learning and humility,  it also illustrates a commitment to establishing a mutual understanding and the care that he invested into others that was so transcendent.


On a similar note to Peter's - Ken knew I like to take photos when I ride. We shared ride photos and were always looking for good shots for ART slides. I find it's when I'm riding alone that I take most of my photos - it's so simple to pull over and take the time to fiddle or explore and you can take as much time as needed - a luxury not always the case when not riding solo.  Here's the kind of photos Ken would return with:

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These photos just made me want to explore that area and that road and the images invoke my mind to start spinning with curiosity. In contrast, I would return with a photo of my bike in front a of barn  - yawn! :ohboy:

 

Something @twistyguy said made me chuckle. Whenever I rode with Ken, he was always clear to let me know that it was OK to stop and take photos if I saw anything that looked interesting. And knowing the pressure one feels when riding with others not to stop, this came from a very sincere place. Whenever we would stop - which as you know if you've ridden with Ken - was not often, he would again make sure you knew it was OK to stop and take a photo. I chuckle because - when we would ride together, it took every once of concentration to focus on where I was going - and I had no idea of what I'd just passed! I was unable to multitask and take in what I was passing by, let alone consider what kind of photo it might make. But that was nothing at all for Ken :bike: , he was able to do both - and with a discerning eye - as Peter pointed out. That was remarkable.

 

And so was Ken.

 

 

 

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Tasker
Posted (edited)

I posted this over on the FB page, as well:

 

Mark Davis told me about Ken's accident Saturday night. I'm still in disbelief. Ken and I clicked as soon as we met many years ago at one of the El Paseo weekends in NC.The last time I saw Ken was a FART weekend in Blairsville (thanks for the reminder, Dave). He and I had one of the funniest conversations that week about a man of his GQ looks getting older and how it affects his modeling career. I asked him, "Ken, what happens to GQ-looking models like yourself when you are too old for underwear and condom adds?" While laughing, he told me that he moves over to Cabella's and Orvis. I asked him, "And then after that?" He told me then it was time to model adult diapers. I'm really sorry that he will not ever model adult diapers. As has been told by many, he was the real deal and will be missed by many. He was so kind and gracious to everyone who met him--always helpful. Godspeed, my friend...

Edited by Tasker
Clarification
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Indy Dave

And who could forget this commercial Ken did:

 

 

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BamaJohn

Here's to you, Brother!  

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RightSpin

It's taken me a day of work and talking with good friends to crack open my photo archives and start finding pictures of Ken from this year.  I can tell a bunch of stories, and probably will as time progresses, but I'll just let these pictures speak for themselves. 

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RightSpin

And my favorite from our last ride together.  You guys were so much fun to be with that day Nikki.

 

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MikeRC

 

I'm sorry I never met Ken.  But I always appreciated his photographer's eye and looked over his photo gallery a few times over the years.  

 

May those he left behind remember the best.  

 

Mike C

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SteveHebert

Shocked is an understatement.  Steve reached out to me and gave me this very sad news.  I still can’t believe it.  From our first encounter over 17 years ago when Ken and Brinda blew past Uli and me like we were standing still, to my last BB&B

event, we stayed in touch - talking about riding and helping me look for realtors and properties in the Smokies.

 

Nikki - The pictures of your last trip together in SA highlighted the love you two shared.  I am so sorry this has happened and just can’t imagine the heartache you are feeling.  Please be comforted in beautiful memories of Ken and from all the beautiful things said about him here.  He was one hell of a guy!

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Selden

Oh jeez. Brain fart. I didn't connect "Ken Insley" with "Kinsley" until I looked at this thread and saw the photos. Ken was probably the last person on this list that I would have expected.

 

Life really isn't fair when guys like him are gone while geezers like Bernie, Marty, and me push on. 

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SSTwin

As all have said already, this sad news truly is a gut punch to all who knew Ken and loved his company, humor, guidance and good cheer,  One of a kind in so many ways.  I had the good fortune of being with Ken on several events and always came away feeling thankful that it was yet another great experience, made more enjoyable because of Ken.

 

Godspeed, Ken.  May your future journeys be filled with wonderful roads, great adventure, and if we are all so fortunate, many shared memories of the good times together.  See you around the bend.......

 

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twistyguy
6 hours ago, Selden said:

Oh jeez. Brain fart. I didn't connect "Ken Insley" with "Kinsley" until I looked at this thread and saw the photos. Ken was probably the last person on this list that I would have expected.

 

Life really isn't fair when guys like him are gone while geezers like Bernie, Marty, and me push on. 

In the spirit of remembering Ken’s sense of humor, “thanks Sheldon!”  You know he would have said that!

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Ed's Tagalong

Circa 2015, I believe. We'll miss you Ken. RIP.

 

My prayers and sympathy for Nikki and family.

 

IR192.jpg

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EffBee
On 4/19/2020 at 10:08 AM, David said:

When I started El Paseo, with the help of a bunch of friends, he was instrumental in the ride planning. A very gracious guy and an avid rider. He was also a big enthusiast of the Riding Well program, and helped me organize a few of the earlier "instruct the instructor" classes. Ken represented what motorcycling was about: loved people, loved riding, and selfless.

 

Very much along the same lines.  Back when I ran the board, we needed a location for the UnRally back east the following year.  It didn't take long and Ken contacted me and asked if he could take it on.  I'd known Ken from the board and some of the east coast events he'd organized, but I didn't know him personally.  But I was going to find out, and quick.  He not only put on the Unrally the next year, but he kept me abreast of every step along the way, even up to sending me the negotiated room rates contract as well as the contract for the rental of the banquet hall for the last day's group dinner.  He sent me route files.  He sent me restaurant locations (even menus) in the area for riders to enjoy.    He always asked, "What do you think? Can we do better?"  He wanted it to be a great event.  

 

I finally got to meet him and thank him in person at the Red Lodge UnRally.  And he was every bit the upbeat, positive, always smiling, give-me-the-ball person everyone who knew Ken had discovered him to be.

My prayers go out to those who knew him, loved him and benefitted from his selflessness.  I know I did, and we did.  RIP, Ken.  May the traction be fantastic and the curves arc perfectly.  And may the speed limit signs say, "Make yourself happy."  

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gamecock
1 hour ago, EffBee said:

 

Very much along the same lines.  Back when I ran the board, we needed a location for the UnRally back east the following year.  It didn't take long and Ken contacted me and asked if he could take it on.  I'd known Ken from the board and some of the east coast events he'd organized, but I didn't know him personally.  But I was going to find out, and quick.  He not only put on the Unrally the next year, but he kept me abreast of every step along the way, even up to sending me the negotiated room rates contract as well as the contract for the rental of the banquet hall for the last day's group dinner.  He sent me route files.  He sent me restaurant locations (even menus) in the area for riders to enjoy.    He always asked, "What do you think? Can we do better?"  He wanted it to be a great event.  

 

I finally got to meet him and thank him in person at the Red Lodge UnRally.  And he was every bit the upbeat, positive, always smiling, give-me-the-ball person everyone who knew Ken had discovered him to be.

My prayers go out to those who knew him, loved him and benefitted from his selflessness.  I know I did, and we did.  RIP, Ken.  May the traction be fantastic and the curves arc perfectly.  And may the speed limit signs say, "Make yourself happy."  

Sad that you will now have to update your signature because another of us has fallen. Thanks for your tribute to Ken. Your quote at the end is so fitting.

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taylor1

I just read this post and had an indescribable feeling come over me .

I only met and rode with Ken once . It was about 10 years ago at a Rubber Chicken rally in W.V.
At the end of the day , I truly enjoyed his company and the tales we swapped on the days ride.
He was very welcoming to me, as I knew no one , and in the brief time we talked , I could tell he was someone special.
May God Rest His Sole  And my condolences To His Loved Ones

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Indy Dave

Don't mess with Ken!

 

 

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Marty Hill

Yes, I can see Ken doing that and getting away with it.

 

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**   Chris   **

This is great, I had never seen any of his commercials!

 

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gamecock
18 hours ago, ** Chris ** said:

This is great, I had never seen any of his commercials!

 

There are five or six on YouTube. Pretty cool. 

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