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And you guys said fork seal replacement was easy...I need a bit of help


Jerry_75_Guy

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Jerry_75_Guy

Well once I managed to get the front wheel off, (I broke three tools, including the standard/phillips head screwdriver from the bikes tool kit getting the axle out) the process of getting the old seal and dust cover out and replaced was really fairly easy....until I tried to put it back together.

 

You can't put the slider back onto the fork unless the bleed valve screw at the top of the fork is open to let excess air out as you push the slider up the fork leg, and there's the rub.

 

The nut holding the fork to the upper fork bridge appears to be frozen. Unless I can get that off, I won't be able to get the fork off to open that bleed screw. Twist hard enough and the fork will rotate in it's socket in the fork bridge, and yes, I can hold it in place with a box wrench under the bridge, but the bolt is still good and stuck. I put a little oil into the threads to loosen it, but with no effect.

 

Unless I can get the bolt off, and the fork out, I'm screwed.

 

Any suggestions?

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Juan_in_a_million
Well once I managed to get the front wheel off, (I broke three tools, including the standard/phillips head screwdriver from the bikes tool kit getting the axle out) the process of getting the old seal and dust cover out and replaced was really fairly easy....until I tried to put it back together.

 

You can't put the slider back onto the fork unless the bleed valve screw at the top of the fork is open to let excess air out as you push the slider up the fork leg, and there's the rub.

 

The nut holding the fork to the upper fork bridge appears to be frozen. Unless I can get that off, I won't be able to get the fork off to open that bleed screw. Twist hard enough and the fork will rotate in it's socket in the fork bridge, and yes, I can hold it in place with a box wrench under the bridge, but the bolt is still good and stuck. I put a little oil into the threads to loosen it, but with no effect.

 

Unless I can get the bolt off, and the fork out, I'm screwed.

 

Any suggestions?

 

To remove the nut on top, you need to slide down the black rubber dust shield under the triple clamp. Then you will shee that the fork, at the top has a hex shape. You need to hold it with a 22mm open wrench while you remove the nut on top.

I'm not sure this is the source of your problem but this is the way I do it.

Juan Antonio

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Juan_in_a_million
Well once I managed to get the front wheel off, (I broke three tools, including the standard/phillips head screwdriver from the bikes tool kit getting the axle out) the process of getting the old seal and dust cover out and replaced was really fairly easy....until I tried to put it back together.

 

You can't put the slider back onto the fork unless the bleed valve screw at the top of the fork is open to let excess air out as you push the slider up the fork leg, and there's the rub.

 

The nut holding the fork to the upper fork bridge appears to be frozen. Unless I can get that off, I won't be able to get the fork off to open that bleed screw. Twist hard enough and the fork will rotate in it's socket in the fork bridge, and yes, I can hold it in place with a box wrench under the bridge, but the bolt is still good and stuck. I put a little oil into the threads to loosen it, but with no effect.

 

Unless I can get the bolt off, and the fork out, I'm screwed.

 

Any suggestions?

 

To remove the nut on top, you need to slide down the black rubber dust shield under the triple clamp. Then you will shee that the fork, at the top has a hex shape. You need to hold it with a 22mm open wrench while you remove the nut on top.

I'm not sure this is the source of your problem but this is the way I do it.

Juan Antonio

 

Sorry I did not read the last paragraph of your message. I guess you're already doing what I suggested. dopeslap.gif

Maybe somebody used loctite on the top nut. Try heating it with a heating gun.

Juan Antonio

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When you rotate the fork tube you can't access the bleed valve? Seems like I remember leaving them in a position that allowed access without fork removal.

74.png

Are you talking about number nut #4 being frozen? I'd try a legitimate penetrating oil like liquid wrench.

 

Otherwise, you could always turn the bike upside down and unscrew the drain plug to let air out. eek.gif

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Juan_in_a_million

Unless I can get the bolt off, and the fork out, I'm screwed.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Also, (For big problems, big solutions) you could use an impact wrench. I wouldn't use it to tighten the nut but to loosen it I would do it as a last resort.

I have never seen that particular stud nor nut with rust buildup on any bike so I would say that the source of the problem is that either somebody crossed the threads or somebody applied loctite on it.

 

I wish you luck

 

Juan Antonio

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Jerry,

I had a similar problem with mine. My vent screw was loose and I needed to remove the fork leg to tighten it but I had difficulty in getting the top nut undone.

I resorted to Juan Antonio's impact gun solution and it worked quite easily.

My biggest concern was shearing the stud from the top of the fork but luckily, that didn't occur.

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Jerry_75_Guy

Thanks guys. Unfortunately the space between the bottom of the fork bridge and the bleed screw is approx. 1/4", so unless I can find an Allen wrench with a very short elbow, the bolt will have to come off some how.

 

Apparently, this nut hasn't been exposed since initial assembly, has a small amount of white corrosion on it, and has some blue left on it from the loctite used during that initial assembly (a$$holes!! Ggrrr!!).

 

Looks like a trip to look at impact wrenches tomorrow frown.giftongue.gif

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Jerry, If you can get any kind of tool on the edge of that bleed valve, I think that would be the easiest. Needle nose vice grips sometimes work well. There "shouldn't" be that much force invloved to break it free, but then your top nut "shouldn't" be siezed either. My adivce would be that if you don't "need" to unsieze that nut, don't mess with it.

 

I always cringe about tearing into something with an impact wrench, particularly where things are made of aluminum. Looking back, that has always been the point where my cheap, one day projects turn into month long, and several hundred dollar investments.

 

OTOH it may work great. Just a word of caution. wave.gif

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What Ken said, what Sid said. Rotating the tube, and using a cut down Allen or a ball end Allen you should be able to get to the bleed plug without removing the retaining nut.

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Jerry_75_Guy
What Ken said, what Sid said. Rotating the tube, and using a cut down Allen or a ball end Allen you should be able to get to the bleed plug without removing the retaining nut.

 

Yep, cutting down a Allen occured to me also, and buying a new set and cutting several down has got to be cheaper than an impact wrench (although I've been wanting one for a while and this seemed a good excuse tongue.gif). You're right, though, about getting a little too excited and 'goin' all cowboy' with an impact wrench; I didn't stop to think about the 'aluminum' aspect of the problem, but my 'spidey sense' felt like something bad was hiding somewhere in this process. The needlenose plier idea is worth a shot too. Can't believe that didn't occur to me; the bleed valve is knurled on the exterior for better grip, implying this type of approach. I'll report back.

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Jerry_75_Guy

Quick follow up. Needlenose pliers 'no worky', but after a little trim with the Dremel, the Allen wrench worked; it was slow going as it was still a pretty tight fit though.

 

Thanks very much for all the input; I was starting to get a bit tweaked.

 

Now, just 1k mi to go then I'll get started on the 42k service. I can't wait, she really needs a TBS done; sure vibrates more than the VFR tongue.gif (eh..maybe I'll start a little early).

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Juan_in_a_million
after a little trim with the Dremel, the Allen wrench worked

 

thumbsup.gifthumbsup.gifclap.gifclap.gif

 

Congratulations. The impact wrench solution, as I said, should be a "last resort". However, somebody correct me if I'm wrong, I don't think that the fork studs are aluminum. I think they are steal.

Juan Antonio

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