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RosBos

Parasitic draw ???mA, what is normal?

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RosBos

Does anyone know what is max allowable draw on the battery with the bike off, key out of ignition?

 

2012 GSA, if it sits for 4-5 days would not turn. Battery (gel) is few months old. Nothing plugged in the accessory socket, only aftermarket thing added is led stop, turn lights bar.

 

Thanks

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dirtrider
6 hours ago, RosBos said:

Does anyone know what is max allowable draw on the battery with the bike off, key out of ignition?

 

2012 GSA, if it sits for 4-5 days would not turn. Battery (gel) is few months old. Nothing plugged in the accessory socket, only aftermarket thing added is led stop, turn lights bar.

 

Thanks

 

 

Afternoon  RosBos

 

The only info that I have is for the earlier 1200 GS bikes (I sent you that info in a  reply to your PM).

 

I forgot to mention that you need to be careful in how you measure the parasitic draw as the 1200 bike's onboard electronics can play games with you after a battery dis-connect.

 

I usually remove the battery cable from  the battery post, then hook up a good sized jumper between the removed cable & battery post, then turn the key to on (allow dash to boot & stabilize), then turn key off & wait about 20 minutes.

 

Next, hook your amp meter between the battery post the cable  (BEFORE disconnecting the jumper), THEN disconnect the jumper & read the meter. 

 

 

 

 

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RosBos
UPDATE:
 
Had a chance to work on this problem this weekend while installing Touratech cockpit assembly on my bike. What I have learned and discovered (pictures attached):
  1. Alternator works fine, engine running at 3500 rpm and measured over 14V at the battery terminals
  2. Parasitic draw was over 80mA with everything connected as it came from previous owner (did make little difference with key in off and key in lock position)
  3. To troubleshoot I disconnected AdMore Lighting Inc. LED bar (installed by previous owner), parasitic draw drops dramatically.
  4. Further research proved that initial instructions that came with this LED assembly were wrong. Previous owner had wired it to the battery as instructed. They have since changed the instructions (surprise!), so it needed to be wired to switched power.
  5. Rewired the light bar to positive wire leading to under seat accessory plug.
  6. With cockpit installed, LED bar rewired and after 15 minutes post turning off the bike parasitic draw is now 1.39 mA.
  7. 15 minutes because it takes about 10 minutes (rider manual) after turning the bike off for control module to shut down the power to all systems and power consuming parts.

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dirtrider
1 hour ago, RosBos said:
UPDATE:
 
Had a chance to work on this problem this weekend while installing Touratech cockpit assembly on my bike. What I have learned and discovered (pictures attached):
  1. Alternator works fine, engine running at 3500 rpm and measured over 14V at the battery terminals
  2. Parasitic draw was over 80mA with everything connected as it came from previous owner (did make little difference with key in off and key in lock position)
  3. To troubleshoot I disconnected AdMore Lighting Inc. LED bar (installed by previous owner), parasitic draw drops dramatically.
  4. Further research proved that initial instructions that came with this LED assembly were wrong. Previous owner had wired it to the battery as instructed. They have since changed the instructions (surprise!), so it needed to be wired to switched power.
  5. Rewired the light bar to positive wire leading to under seat accessory plug.
  6. With cockpit installed, LED bar rewired and after 15 minutes post turning off the bike parasitic draw is now 1.39 mA.
  7. 15 minutes because it takes about 10 minutes (rider manual) after turning the bike off for control module to shut down the power to all systems and power consuming parts.

 

 

Afternoon RosBos   

 

Thanks for the update,

 

I hope that you got rid of that blue Scotch Lock in the process  as those things are almost guaranteed to ruin a future ride due to electrical gremlins.

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Ladioviro
On 9/25/2019 at 3:44 PM, dirtrider said:

 

 

Afternoon RosBos   

 

Thanks for the update,

 

I hope that you got rid of that blue Scotch Lock in the process  as those things are almost guaranteed to ruin a future ride due to electrical gremlins.

What's the substitution? 

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dirtrider
46 minutes ago, Ladioviro said:

What's the substitution? 

 

Evening Ladioviro

 

There are a number of ways  much better than those darn Scotch Locks.

 

Personally I just hate chasing electrical issues caused by someone's old improper wire taps as they sometimes work & sometimes don't so can be a devil to find at times.

 

My personal way is to strip  back the insulation on the original wire, then strip back the end  of the added wire, then use a properly crimped splice clip to make a resistance free connection, then carefully solder the splice slip,  then cover the joint with properly sized sealing type heat-shrink. If I can't slide the heat shrink on the original wire then I usually  cut the wire then slide on the heat shrink, then  hook the 3 ends together with a properly crimped splice clip, then solder the splice clip, then slide the heat shrink over the exposed joint & heat shrink it.  (the important thing is get a solid resistance free joint that is totally sealed from future moisture intrusion).

 

Some do use a thing called a  ' posi-tap '  as those are WAY better than a  Scotch Lock, I'm not that crazy about ' posi-tap's ' myself but they do work & are a better attachment than the wire damaging Scotch Locks.  

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Bud

By properly crimped splice, I assume you mean one done with a "real" splice crimping tool, not that black, flat sheet metal kind that comes with the cheap connectors in the kit from Wally World.

 

Rather than just tightening the sleeve around the wire, a professional crimping tool actually produces enough force to cold fuse the wire and the sleeve. 

 

 

notthisone.jpg

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dirtrider
4 minutes ago, Bud said:

By properly crimped splice, I assume you mean one done with a "real" splice crimping tool, not that black, flat sheet metal kind that comes with the cheap connectors in the kit from Wally World.

 

Rather than just tightening the sleeve around the wire, a professional crimping tool actually produces enough force to cold fuse the wire and the sleeve. 

 

 

notthisone.jpg

 

Afternoon Bud

 

Yes, a real (correct) crimping tool, that one that you have pictured is not the correct tool for properly folding splice clip ears.

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Rider1200RT

May I suggest a marine grade crimp as they have heat shrink built in that after properly crimping virtually guarantees a waterproof connection... YMMV

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dirtrider
14 hours ago, Rider1200RT said:

May I suggest a marine grade crimp as they have heat shrink built in that after properly crimping virtually guarantees a waterproof connection... YMMV

 

Morning  Rider1200RT

 

Those are  one of the best (non-solder) for  joining 2 wire ends as they work well on non ferrous wires that can't easily be soldered. In fact they are about the only approved non-solder wire repair for ABS wheel speed sensor wires on automobiles due to their use of sealing type heat shrink.

 

They do require a perfect crimp using a proper tool as there is no way to solder the wire joint due to the built on sealing heat shrink.

 

The problem is they are not the best for adding a tee'd in wire as the original wire needs to be cut  then one end going into the crimp will  have a double wire. So if the crimp is sized correctly for the double wire end then the single end will be too large to properly crimp to the single wire unless that wire end is folded over on itself .  They are basically a fancy butt connector but Still a LOT better than those darn  Scotch Locks.  

 

 

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Bud

When wiring up the Hyperlites to the Hex EZ Can, the wires were so small and thin that I used a Western Union splice w/o solder then heat shrink to fasten and seal out moisture. There is no tension on either end so it won't physically pull apart and the heat shrink insures that it stays dry.

 

Most likely not approved by anyone, but it works for me.

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