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TEWKS

Whip's Music Videos Part 2

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TEWKS

The original thread is a traffic jam so let's open another lane. ;) A great beat with some funny tossed in. :cool:

 

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Rougarou

Meh, a little "older" school,......recognize the sample??

 

 

 

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Whip

 

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Rougarou

Enjoy this little Dutch band.  It has a mix of melodic female vocals and brutal death growls.......good stuff

 

 

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Rougarou

A fine, fine oldie

 

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday

This popped up earlier this week.  A couple of years ago, Huun-Huur-Tu, a Tuvan folk music group, did a 45-minute session for Seattle public radio (KEXP) .  I like obscure global folk music like this; close your eyes and listen and imagine yourself on horseback, roaming across the steppes of central Asia.

 

1:09 Chryaa-Khoor (Yellow Pacer)

8:33 Konguroi (Sixty Horses In My Herd)

13:33 Interview

28:58 Odugen Taiga

41:12 Aa-Shuu Dekei-oo

 

 

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday

From the previous video, I went a little further down the rabbit hole and found these guys.  I used to think German was the best language for metal, but now I'm pretty sure it's Mongolian:

 

 

 

If you like their Mongol-warrior sound, check out Song of Women, their powerhouse ode to the female half of Mongolia.

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Rougarou
13 minutes ago, Joe Frickin' Friday said:

From the previous video, I went a little further down the rabbit hole and found these guys.  I used to think German was the best language for metal, but now I'm pretty sure it's Mongolian:

 

 

 

If you like their Mongol-warrior sound, check out Song of Women, their powerhouse ode to the female half of Mongolia.

 

I so dig it when traditional and modern collide.  Eluveite is an example of a band that takes traditional instruments (hurdy-gurdy, flute, etc) and bring it to the front with the metal sound.  If we go back to Jethro Tull and Ian Andersons flute (genre debatable, I like to think of them as Diet Metal), which I believe that many people said "how can you have a flute in metal/rock",......well, I think it works.

 

Thanks for bringing this group up.

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Rougarou
On 10/3/2019 at 8:06 AM, Joe Frickin' Friday said:

From the previous video, I went a little further down the rabbit hole and found these guys.  I used to think German was the best language for metal, but now I'm pretty sure it's Mongolian:

 

 

 

If you like their Mongol-warrior sound, check out Song of Women, their powerhouse ode to the female half of Mongolia.

 

When I'm on my personal medieval torture devices in the basement sweating it out, I have youtube running to take my mind somewhere other than than my present physical exertion.  The playlist was started as Lacuna Coil but morphs into various other groups including "The Hu".  One particularly interesting video that popped up was Heilung  definitely different, definitely worth another listen to.

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday

Bluegrass pickin' - Japanese style, courtesy of the Yoshida brothers:

 

 

The instrument is called a shamisen.  Three strings, no frets - and for these guys, no sweat.   Top comment on the video sums it up:  "It's like a cool Japanese banjo that you play with a paint scraper."

 

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Rougarou
39 minutes ago, Joe Frickin' Friday said:

 

 

 

The instrument is called a shamisen.  Three strings, no frets - and for these guys, no sweat.   Top comment on the video sums it up:  "It's like a cool Japanese banjo that you play with a paint scraper."

 

 

Where we lived in Okinawa, the locals would play the Sanshin nightly, I dig it.

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Joe Frickin' Friday

I love watching TED talks; they're a great way to pass the time on long flights.  I recent stumbled on this one, delivered by choral composer Eric Whitacre.  You can watch the talk at that link if you want - it's interesting - but it's not the music video I'm here to share.  I'll give you the 15-second summary of that TED talk here:

 

In 2010 Whitacre posted a video on YouTube in which he asked other YouTubers to post videos of themselves singing a part - soprano, alto, bass, whatever - for a choral composition he had written.  Each singer sang alone while watching a video of him conducting, so every singer's voice was perfectly synced.  Whitacre and his team then collected all of the videos and assembled them into a virtual choir 2000+ voices strong. 

 

Here's the result:

 

 

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scout6

Joe,

This is a very similar thing to your link above.  The folks here have done some great multitrack recording, and do a lot for poor areas of the world.  Love the double meaning of the group.

Rob

https://images.app.goo.gl/jNUsBCBQ8PcFScUc6

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Joe Frickin' Friday
1 hour ago, scout6 said:

Joe,

This is a very similar thing to your link above.  The folks here have done some great multitrack recording, and do a lot for poor areas of the world.  Love the double meaning of the group.

Rob

https://images.app.goo.gl/jNUsBCBQ8PcFScUc6

 

Thanks, that was pretty slick.

 

Going off in a slightly different direction, here's a cooperative effort between Bobby McFerrin and the audience at a concert he gave.  McFerrin of course planned this, but certainly the audience did not; it's crazy what he can do with his voice, and the result of their cooperation is surprisingly beautiful.  

 

 

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eddd

Here's another "sing-a-long" video, and one where audience singing really added to the performance.
 

 

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roadscholar

Takin it down a notch or three.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rougarou

Oh, did someone post a little Cajun:

 

 

 

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Joe Frickin' Friday

Puddles Pity Party is a peculiar act: a giant of a man (6' 8") dresses as a sad clown and performs covers of popular songs.   If you've seen him on America's Got Talent, then you know he's got a Voice.  

 

He recently posted an unusual cover of a classic rock staple, Foreigner's "I Want To Know What Love Is."  His explanation:

 

Quote

A new friend of ours (yours and mine) suggested I do this tune. I was like "I dunno". What could I do that would make it ours (yours & mine)? Just then it came to me. All those sweet critters out there, in need of forever homes, are yearning for kindness and safety and security. They want to know what love is. And we (you & me) could provide that for them. Please adopt.

 

Here ya go:

 

 

 

 

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