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MarinPhil

Time to replace front brake pads

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MarinPhil

Getting ready for a long trip and front brake pads need replacing.  First time on the old girl, 2000 R1100RT.  So, seems fairly straight forward.  Pull out cotter pin on brake retaining pin.  Loosen retaining pin. Remove caliper bolts and remove caliper, not letting it damage brake line or scratch the wheel. When i remove the retaining pin,, push each side pad in.  At this point do the pads just drop out?  Reassemble.  Am i missing anything?  Thanks.  Oh, on other pad replacements, I’ve usually put a very small amount of copper paste on the back side of each pad- good?  Anything special on the abs side other than being careful of the abs sensor and wire?

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dirtrider
10 hours ago, MarinPhil said:

Getting ready for a long trip and front brake pads need replacing.  First time on the old girl, 2000 R1100RT.  So, seems fairly straight forward.  Pull out cotter pin on brake retaining pin.  Loosen retaining pin. Remove caliper bolts and remove caliper, not letting it damage brake line or scratch the wheel. When i remove the retaining pin,, push each side pad in.  At this point do the pads just drop out?  Reassemble.  Am i missing anything?  Thanks.  Oh, on other pad replacements, I’ve usually put a very small amount of copper paste on the back side of each pad- good?  Anything special on the abs side other than being careful of the abs sensor and wire?

 

Morning MarinPhil   

 

That pretty well coves it.

 

Just make sure that  the master cylinder isn't overfull before starting as the  fluid level in the reservoir will increase with installing thicker (new brake pads). If the reservoir is overfull that not only makes pushing the caliper pistons back in difficult but can cause brake drag on the new brake pads due to pressure build up  with no place for the expanded fluid to go. Plus, brake fluid can  go all over the bike if you ever remove the reservoir cover with it under pressure of being too full.

 

If you can see in the master cylinder reservoir view window (maybe if it isn't too clouded) then you can open a caliper bleed screw to let some fluid out if you need to.

 

On the copper paste usage?-- you can as some riders do, just be very carful to not apply very much & do not get any on the brake rotor or friction side of the brake pads. If you new brake pads already have an anti-squeal coating on the back side of brake pads then you shouldn't need to add anything additional.

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MarinPhil

Much 🙏. Riding up to BC Vancouver in September.  Always looking forward for some alone time. Shhhh. Dont tell the wife. 

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BrianM

I clean the calipers any time I change brake pads (actually clean them every winter), before pushing the pistons back in.

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MarinPhil

K. The new front pads install went off without a hitch. Didnt have to take off wheel and thanks to Dirtrider’s advice, I bled a little form the left side and then same for right side before pushing the pistons in for the new pads. 

 After the task was done, just added a little dot4 back into the reservoir to just below the top of the sight glass. 

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