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John Ranalletta

Brisket

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John Ranalletta

So, after watching shows about the guy in Austin who can't smoke enough brisket to satisfy all who want it; and, after having brisket at Kruez Market in Lockhart, TX, we bought a Traeger smoker.  Bought full briskets from the best butcher in Indy followed numerous recipes to the T; got the digital blue-tooth thermometers.  Everything but a baby cam to watch it cook.  The result?  Brisket with the texture akin to that of a rubber bungee cord.  Pork loins tend to do well.  RIbs are so-so.  Too much trouble and time for the results we're getting.

 

Tri-tips by Goodyear, too.  Wish I had Glenno's touch with the grill.

 

How by you?

 

Kruez Market brisket & sausage.  If you're in the San Antonio vicinity, don't miss it.

 

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aggieengineer

What temperature were you cooking at?

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Antimatter

Prep is the key.  For ribs, you need a good rub and to let the ribs sit overnight in the fridge covered.  I take the ribs, make sure to remove all the facia, cover them in mustard, then sprinkle enough rub to completely coat them.  I just use my regular gas grill, but I have two pans of wood chips (one dry, one wet) and a pan of water under the grate.   The grill gets run with just the back burner on, and the ribs in front..  2 hours and 45 minutes at 245 F (250-is is fine), then lightly coat the ribs with a sauce of your choice and put them over a 'live' burner for about 5 minutes per side - that caramelizes the sauce.  That give me a rib that is slightly toothsome, as I don't like gelatinous consistent meat. 

Moisture content really seems to be the key to avoiding rubbery meat.  I used to make ribs in the stove in a closed turkey pan over a bath of water, but changed to the grill over time. 

For tri-tip, again a good rub is key.  I use the Susie-Q's tri-tip rub, again letting the meat sit overnight in the fridge before grilling.  High heat sear, then low heat until it passes the 'bounce test', although I also use an meat thermometer to check the internal temp.  And - very important - bring the meat in from the grill, wrap it in foil, and let it sit for 5 - 10 minutes before slicing.  That's when I do the rest of the side-dish prep (garlic toast, and a veg). 

Hope that helps!

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John Ranalletta
1 hour ago, aggieengineer said:

What temperature were you cooking at?

 

Whatever Traeger recommended.  Monitor both meat internal and cooker temp to assure in spec.

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John Ranalletta
36 minutes ago, Antimatter said:

Prep is the key.  For ribs, you need a good rub and to let the ribs sit overnight in the fridge covered.  I take the ribs, make sure to remove all the facia, cover them in mustard, then sprinkle enough rub to completely coat them.  I just use my regular gas grill, but I have two pans of wood chips (one dry, one wet) and a pan of water under the grate.   The grill gets run with just the back burner on, and the ribs in front..  2 hours and 45 minutes at 245 F (250-is is fine), then lightly coat the ribs with a sauce of your choice and put them over a 'live' burner for about 5 minutes per side - that caramelizes the sauce.  That give me a rib that is slightly toothsome, as I don't like gelatinous consistent meat. 

Moisture content really seems to be the key to avoiding rubbery meat.  I used to make ribs in the stove in a closed turkey pan over a bath of water, but changed to the grill over time. 

For tri-tip, again a good rub is key.  I use the Susie-Q's tri-tip rub, again letting the meat sit overnight in the fridge before grilling.  High heat sear, then low heat until it passes the 'bounce test', although I also use an meat thermometer to check the internal temp.  And - very important - bring the meat in from the grill, wrap it in foil, and let it sit for 5 - 10 minutes before slicing.  That's when I do the rest of the side-dish prep (garlic toast, and a veg). 

Hope that helps!

 

Thanks.  I'm thinking of trying a PitBarrel and ditching the smoker.

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aggieengineer

Remember, Aaron Franklin said his early attempts were not very good. "Disgusting" is the word I believe he used.

 

I bought my first pellet smoker in March. It's a MAK. My first brisket was nothing to brag about, but I'm getting better. I backed off Franklin's 275 recommended temperature and have settled on 250. I do use his seasoning method, wrap at the stall, remove at about 200 or when tender, and then let it rest for a couple of hours, still wrapped, in a warm oven (160F). 

I have found that practice and patience have really improved my skill. We did beef ribs last week for the first time and they were wonderful.

 

IMG_1222.jpeg.d1aeea1867a77fe51f62fff6c453ba46.jpeg

 

French cooking is one of my hobbies. I remember the first time I deboned a chicken. Looked like it had been run over by a lawnmower. After a few times I got better, and now I can knock one out in no time without really thinking about it. 

 

Give it some time. Use quality meat, not something from the neighborhood grocery store. Sam's, Costco, and Central Market in Texas carry prime. 

 

As they say, it's the Indian, not the arrow. Best of luck, and remember, it's just for fun. 

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Danny caddyshack Noonan

I've had very good luck with the Traeger.  Follow the process/temp recipe in the T book for the most part.  However, I take it to at least 195.  First one was a good example of Radial T/As when I pulled it at 193 or 4.....whatever the book says. 

Tritip: I only cook Costco dry rubbed now for the most part.  Smoke for at least 1.5 hrs then finish at higher temp or on the gas grill for a bit of char.

 

You can get a bad piece of meat.  For example, we haven't found any good flap meat in Utah.  It was our mainstay in Cali for fajitas.  Don't know why.

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