Jump to content
bimmers

Fuel Tank Quick Connect Replacement/ Clamp handling

Recommended Posts

bimmers

Riding 600 miles and at end of ride I smelled fuel/gas when stopping. Prior to ride I had the fuel gauge strip replaced for the 3rd time on the bike.

Called dealer and asked about their procedure when doing the strip. Nothing that would affect the quick connect that I had found to be leaking. 

Went to local dealer ordered the male piece and got a few hose clamps as well. 

My question became how to release the old and then tighten the new clamp, DIrt Rider advised me quickly and I ended up using wirecutters to cut the top of the clamp and a hoof/nail plier to tighten it by squeezing it to same shape as the remaining old clamp had, easy match when next to each other.

 

After releasing the clamp I had some hard time getting the male piece off the hose, it twisted around but was hard to pull off, had to manhandle it and a little worried about damaging the hose, at the end all ok and tested for no leaks also after short ride.

 

It was clear that the culprit was the O ring which really would have been enough to replace. Now I have old plastic set up still while I will order the metal version to have at hand and replace when time is ripe, for both my bikes. 

 

A shout out to Dirt Rider for his timely advice, in spite of "hijack of other topic, that is why this is its own now. 

 

thanks again

 

Hans 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
8 hours ago, bimmers said:

Riding 600 miles and at end of ride I smelled fuel/gas when stopping. Prior to ride I had the fuel gauge strip replaced for the 3rd time on the bike.

Called dealer and asked about their procedure when doing the strip. Nothing that would affect the quick connect that I had found to be leaking. 

Went to local dealer ordered the male piece and got a few hose clamps as well. 

My question became how to release the old and then tighten the new clamp, DIrt Rider advised me quickly and I ended up using wirecutters to cut the top of the clamp and a hoof/nail plier to tighten it by squeezing it to same shape as the remaining old clamp had, easy match when next to each other.

 

After releasing the clamp I had some hard time getting the male piece off the hose, it twisted around but was hard to pull off, had to manhandle it and a little worried about damaging the hose, at the end all ok and tested for no leaks also after short ride.

 

It was clear that the culprit was the O ring which really would have been enough to replace. Now I have old plastic set up still while I will order the metal version to have at hand and replace when time is ripe, for both my bikes. 

 

A shout out to Dirt Rider for his timely advice, in spite of "hijack of other topic, that is why this is its own now. 

 

thanks again

 

Hans 

 

Morning Hans

 

Thanks of the follow up in a new thread & thanks for the follow up.

 

There was a BMW recall on a fuel leak at the high pressure fitting boss on the top of the fuel pump assembly.

 

The plastic boss was cracking allowing a fuel leak at the crack, if the crack was small (or no crack) BMW would install a clamp ring around the plastic boss. If the crack was large, or  leak appeared, BMW would install a new fuel pump assembly.

 

I have seen a few that had the ring added for the recall start to leak at a later time due to the clamp ring not doing it's job so the crack enlarged even with the ring installed.

 

The other place for a leak is right in the quick disconnect, if the  quick disconnect is not properly removed with the release trigger staying in then it is possible to nick the "O" ring  inside  & cause a fuel leak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ponch
17 hours ago, dirtrider said:

 

Morning Hans

 

Thanks of the follow up in a new thread & thanks for the follow up.

 

There was a BMW recall on a fuel leak at the high pressure fitting boss on the top of the fuel pump assembly.

 

The plastic boss was cracking allowing a fuel leak at the crack, if the crack was small (or no crack) BMW would install a clamp ring around the plastic boss. If the crack was large, or  leak appeared, BMW would install a new fuel pump assembly.

 

I have seen a few that had the ring added for the recall start to leak at a later time due to the clamp ring not doing it's job so the crack enlarged even with the ring installed.

 

The other place for a leak is right in the quick disconnect, if the  quick disconnect is not properly removed with the release trigger staying in then it is possible to nick the "O" ring  inside  & cause a fuel leak.

 

Mine started to leak a couple years after the fix due to the dope not holding up. I replaced the female QD with a metal one. Funny thing is, when I called and emailed the dealer for help, they never called or contacted me back, so I fixed it myself as it was leaking and I didn't want to ride it. Anyway, it seems that the plastic BMW uses is substandard. I've heard they have similar issues with their cars. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
7 hours ago, Ponch said:

 

Mine started to leak a couple years after the fix due to the dope not holding up. I replaced the female QD with a metal one. Funny thing is, when I called and emailed the dealer for help, they never called or contacted me back, so I fixed it myself as it was leaking and I didn't want to ride it. Anyway, it seems that the plastic BMW uses is substandard. I've heard they have similar issues with their cars. 

 

 

Morning Ponch

 

It's not so much the plastic type used, it's the basic design of that area.

 

I don't know who designed that QD/ plastic boss area but they most likely didn't have any common sense (and definitely no fuel system design background). 

 

Who in their ever lovin right mind would design a high pressure fuel connection using a tapered pipe thread screwed into a small diameter raised unsupported plastic  boss with no means of a secondary sealing area??????

 

That tapered thread is like a splitting wedge when it is screwed in as it forces the plastic boss to expand & crack (it was definitely a guaranteed designed-to-fail situation)

 

Most (good)  similar designs in the automotive world would use a straight thread on the fitting with an "O" ring  in a groove between the top of the plastic boss & the fuel fitting. 

 

The straight threads won't  easily split the plastic & crack it when screwed in,  & the use of  an  "O" ring for sealing means the fitting doesn't have to be tightened very tightly to get a leak proof seal.   

 

This is one of those things that you look at & think, what the heck were they thinking (or smoking) when they designed the darn thing. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ponch
1 hour ago, dirtrider said:

 

 

Morning Ponch

 

It's not so much the plastic type used, it's the basic design of that area.

 

I don't know who designed that QD/ plastic boss area but they most likely didn't have any common sense (and definitely no fuel system design background). 

 

Who in their ever lovin right mind would design a high pressure fuel connection using a tapered pipe thread screwed into a small diameter raised unsupported plastic  boss with no means of a secondary sealing area??????

 

That tapered thread is like a splitting wedge when it is screwed in as it forces the plastic boss to expand & crack (it was definitely a guaranteed designed-to-fail situation)

 

Most (good)  similar designs in the automotive world would use a straight thread on the fitting with an "O" ring  in a groove between the top of the plastic boss & the fuel fitting. 

 

The straight threads won't  easily split the plastic & crack it when screwed in,  & the use of  an  "O" ring for sealing means the fitting doesn't have to be tightened very tightly to get a leak proof seal.   

 

This is one of those things that you look at & think, what the heck were they thinking (or smoking) when they designed the darn thing. 

 

 

Right, like the throttle body pulleys and then I've read about coolant pipes on their cars. IMO, they use too much in the wrong places and probably poor quality. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dann

Mine started leaking a couple of years after the recall fix.

I went back to the dealer and BMW replaced the whole pump assembly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...