Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
R65_Steve

Interstate...how fast?

Recommended Posts

R65_Steve

Not a burst to pass a big truck...but how fast do you all ride on the Interstate, sustained?

 

I am new to having a bike that will do OK on the Interstate but I get a little uncomfortable at really fast speed.  Almost unexplainable.  

 

I went to the MOA Rally last week and the test ride went on I40.  I dropped back because I wasn't willing to do more than 75 on the test bike.

 

On my own, not much better...I was doing about 75 (in a 70) and two GS riders blew past me.  

 

I can't decide if it's the wind that bothers me or the speed "number". The bike feels ok and I can drive my car fast, just not keen on two wheel travel this way.  

 

Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marty Hill

Ride at a speed you are comfortable with.    

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
9 minutes ago, R65_Steve said:

Not a burst to pass a big truck...but how fast do you all ride on the Interstate, sustained?

 

I am new to having a bike that will do OK on the Interstate but I get a little uncomfortable at really fast speed.  Almost unexplainable.  

 

I went to the MOA Rally last week and the test ride went on I40.  I dropped back because I wasn't willing to do more than 75 on the test bike.

 

On my own, not much better...I was doing about 75 (in a 70) and two GS riders blew past me.  

 

I can't decide if it's the wind that bothers me or the speed "number". The bike feels ok and I can drive my car fast, just not keen on two wheel travel this way.  

 

Thoughts?

 

Evening R65_Steve

 

It depends on the situation & on the bike but I'm usually in the upper 5% of the fastest. I can usually count the number of vehicles that pass me on one hand.

 

But the bike does make a difference as a faired bike with a good windscreen makes it easy to run triple digits & a bike with a no plastic & a short windscreen makes it an effort to ride comfortably at much above 70.

 

I see that  you have an R bike (not an RT) so that makes high speeds a bit more effort to feel comfortable with.  

 

Don't exceed your comfort zone, you will eventually gain the confidence in your bike & in your ability to get a darn good speeding ticket.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul De

I general I tend to ride about 5 to 10 MPH faster than the average flow for a few reasons.  Keeps most of the risk management of 4 wheel vehicles in front of me and minimizes natural born close followers and those who would tailgate.  Also, helps to make sure you aren't too long in a blind spot.  On the open highway 70 -80 is easy cruising, and a bit slower with the wife.  Merging from an on ramp to the road, I need to slow down from 100 once in a while :grin:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
041100S

Agree with Marty Hill on this, but normally ride +5 over the speed limit as I don't care to pay "THE MAN" in any state.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Selden

I remember a quote from a state trooper in North Carolina: "Nine is fine; ten you're mine." Interstates are probably more forgiving than small towns on back roads. About 15 years ago I got a ticket in Ludowici, GA, once known as the speed trap capital of the USA.

 

69065b8f9338d3fd290b724b1cb3a05c.jpg

 

I came back for "trial" at the local court, which was the rec room of the town fire station. Several hundred people were waiting in line when "court" opened. The arresting officer and court clerk had the same last name. I got off light at $450, unlike the guy who had been arrested for DUI with a loaded AK-47 in the back seat of his car.

 

Fast forward to 2016, when I got a ticket outside Cleveland, GA. I met with the judge, and pleaded nolo. I asked if he had ever driven through Ludiwici. "Oh, yes." He had been driving on a 4-lane highway, and shortly after the speed limit suddenly dropped to 45 mph he saw blue lights in his rearview mirror. The officer who stopped him saw a holster and badge in the back seat of his car, and asked if he was with law enforcement. "Yes, I am a judge." "Won't do you no good." $450.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywagon

As others said...ride where you feel good and in control regardless of what others do.  As DR said, depends on the bike.  In Texas we have some speed limits of 80 and 85MPH.  A buddy of mine who has a pretty naked HD wide glide with just a tiny bit of a windshield (looks more like a number plate to me) and I swap bikes occasionally while we are out.  Not too long ago I was on his bike and he on mine.  We hit one of those 80 MPH roads and he was shoot and gone on my RT and I thought 75 on that wide glide was like going 150 MPH.  I actually slowed down to a more comfortable 65.  We met at the next destination and he remarked my bike rides nice at 10 over....i.e. 95 while I remarked this thing is a piece of !$%!$^.  Get off my bike and you ride yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Living the Dream

So the other day I was donating blood in my building where I work.  We also have a sheriff's office detachment and I've conversed with the Captain quite a few times on building matters.  A couple of deputy's were in with needles in their arms getting blood sucked out when the Captain comes in.  I holler, "Randy, you still haven't caught me yet", ......he smiled, I said "c'mon, you know interstate travel is 85-90", that's when a deputy chimed in "ya, or you'll get run over".

 

Anyway, on the RT, I'm 80-95 until I feel the spidey-sense tingling thus slowing down to 80-75.  With the HP4, I have the speed light pop at 100 to remind me to slow it back down.  For the Honda, meh, anything over 75 and it's rolling vibrator.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ltljohn
2 hours ago, Marty Hill said:

Ride at a speed you are comfortable with.    

Like Marty said, ride your own ride.  I regularly ride with faster riders, they know I will catch up at the next stop. I learned long ago after a few close calls to ride in my skill/comfort zone.  On the highways that is generally a bit faster than traffic

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Johnny Jetson

 

Dirt Rider and Paul De both have good observations. 

 

Most of my riding is in AZ, NV, NM, & TX, so a lot of open space and much of it posted 80 with enforcement at 85 and sometimes more. There are patches of congestion, but nothing like a lot of guys see constantly. 

 

I might add -- 

  • Move with the traffic in whatever lane you choose -- slower traffic creates bottlenecks that cause other drivers to do unsafe things. 
  • If you don't have a good windshield and fairing, consider upgrading your windshield at least. Buffeting is tiring and exposes you to a lot of weather and even flying objects.
  • Know your state and its enforcement habits. In AZ, I-8 toward San Diego is often moving north of 90 with no enforcement evident. Don't ride it unless you are willing to move with it.
  • It seems to me that motorcycles are often given some leeway in speed.  In 100K miles, I think I've been stopped once (94 in a 75), and only got a warning at that. Perhaps the Lidar or Radar doesn't see us well. 
  • Consider a Motorcycle Safety course.  I took a couple and learned a huge amount in only a few days of class and supervised practice.  Made me a much better rider. 

Practice where you have space, get used to it where you don't have to worry about trucks and somnambulant cagers.  

 

And always:  ATGATT!!

 

Blessings

JJ

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve

Thanks folks.   Yes I'm sure a part of it is the wind.  My old airhead was a bother to run fast.  This bike (R1150R) has no issues with it, but even with a little windshield (it's a rockstar) I get some turbulence.  I just got some earplugs so that should cut down on the volume at least.

 

I always ride in my comfort zone on the backroads and Twisties but it seems that the Interstate is my nemesis.    Almost that I have a mental block that I will get blown off the bike or it will suddenly throw me for some strange reason.  

 

Like I said, I see other guys just blast on by and I'm not talking about nutty sportsbikes...guys hauling tents and baggage so I know the physics aren't different for me. 

 

I guess I need more seat time.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twisties
Posted (edited)

When I had a cruiser 80 was outrageously fast and by 90 the back end was loose to the point of danger.  On an RT the faster you go, the more stable the bike gets.  DAMHIK!  In any event, the bike and it's condition do matter.

I agree with others, stay in your comfort zone, and personally I almost never go more than 8 mph over on freeways (slow curvy sections excepted).  But like someone said, we are seeing more and more of freeways that are posted 80 or 85, so sometimes I am cruising 90ish.  I can also say, under the category of DAMHIK, that the faster you go there is a huge hit to fuel economy.  Above a buck sustained this becomes very considerable.  Now where would I have found that out?  :-)

 

In any event, work some on techniques.  Staying loose on the bars and maintaining proper posture will help a lot.  There are some posts in the ride well section of the board to look at.  My guess is that you will be used to it soon.  

Edited by Twisties
omitted word

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twisties

What tires and tire pressures are you running?  How many miles on the shocks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve
7 hours ago, Twisties said:

What tires and tire pressures are you running?  How many miles on the shocks?

 Tires are due to be replaced in a couple weeks.  They are Bridgestone Battle-ax.

 

I can only assume shocks are stock and would have 30K if so.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
8 hours ago, R65_Steve said:

Thanks folks.   Yes I'm sure a part of it is the wind.  My old airhead was a bother to run fast.  This bike (R1150R) has no issues with it, but even with a little windshield (it's a rockstar) I get some turbulence.  I just got some earplugs so that should cut down on the volume at least.

 

I always ride in my comfort zone on the backroads and Twisties but it seems that the Interstate is my nemesis.    Almost that I have a mental block that I will get blown off the bike or it will suddenly throw me for some strange reason.  

 

Like I said, I see other guys just blast on by and I'm not talking about nutty sportsbikes...guys hauling tents and baggage so I know the physics aren't different for me. 

 

I guess I need more seat time.  

 

Morning  R65_Steve

 

That little windshield might be some of your problem. Short windshields usually have very poor air flow characteristics & can be a lot worse if mounted to the steering part of the bike (ie turn with the forks).

 

If you have that uneasy feeling at high speed, like the bike feels unstable at high speeds, (especially around other vehicles) then try riding without the windshield. 

 

Or try a GOOD FUNCTIONING adjustable steering damper  as those can help the high speed tracking & confidence feel (especially when riding in the air flow eddies of other vehicles)  

 

The other thing that some riders fight with is grip on the handlebars. If the bike has that uneasy feeling at high speed then most riders tighten their grip on the handlebars. THAT is the wrong thing to do as it adds the riders mass to the steering system as well as adversely influences the motorcycles natural tracking. (light on the bars = better high speed stability & confidence feel).

 

On the 1150 bikes the rear wheel is seldom directly in line with the front wheel (BMW spec gives a pretty big rear wheel off-set & still be within specs). While it doesn't make a night & day difference reducing the rear tracking off-set can make the bike feel & ride better at very high speeds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve

Thanks.  Yes it has a little windshield (stock they have none).  I saw its twin at the rally with a bigger sheild6980.jpg.f7974cba4b30e2edeedb9b8c682846d5.jpg but those photos are on my old phone.  Are the dampers you speak of the knobs I used to see on the old airheads?  Not clear how that works (I did see a "shock" on one of the GS bikes ...same thing?)

 

Yes, I made the mistake of gripping tighter, I know I did.  Especially on the F850 I rode on the test ride.  On my own bike I bought a set of beemer buddies and installed them immediately.   I love them and it makes it harder to squeeze the heck out of the bars.  Good tip, thanks. 

FB_IMG_1560733784728.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Living the Dream
7 hours ago, Twisties said:

 How many miles on the shocks?

 

hehe for mine, 130000 on the stock rear shock,....don't know on the front shock 'cause it was a replaced used one from ebay a couple of years ago,.....to me, rides just fine.  Air pressure, 36R and 32F  on Roadsmart IIIs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
19 minutes ago, R65_Steve said:

Thanks.  Yes it has a little windshield (stock they have none).  I saw its twin at the rally with a bigger sheild but those photos are on my old phone.  Are the dampers you speak of the knobs I used to see on the old airheads?  Not clear how that works (I did see a "shock" on one of the GS bikes ...same thing?)

 

Yes, I made the mistake of gripping tighter, I know I did.  Especially on the F850 I rode on the test ride.  On my own bike I bought a set of beemer buddies and installed them immediately.   I love them and it makes it harder to squeeze the heck out of the bars.  Good tip, thanks. 

 

 

 

Morning  R65_Steve

 

The newer BMW  boxer bikes don't use the knob type steering damper. On the bikes that use them (a steering damper) they use a friction shock type usually mounted between the lower fork bridge & the frame.

 

Next time you are around the BMW 1100R (not RT) bike look for that friction shock as most 1100R bikes came with a steering damper from the factory.  Not a very effective one but they had one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve

Dirtrider...just making sure I knew what you were taking about.

 

I've been a motorcycle Owner for a long time.  I'm trying to become a better Rider.  

 

Now I'm kicking myself for not taking out one of the big touring bikes at the demo for a comparison.  Next time.  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
14 minutes ago, R65_Steve said:

Dirtrider...just making sure I knew what you were taking about.

 

I've been a motorcycle Owner for a long time.  I'm trying to become a better Rider.  

 

Now I'm kicking myself for not taking out one of the big touring bikes at the demo for a comparison.  Next time.  ;)

 

Morning  R65_Steve

 

If you have a valid motorcycle endorsement then most BMW dealers will put you on a demo bike if they have what you are looking for in their demo fleet.

 

Getting on a  BMW demo bike is easy, getting that demo bike on a high speed freeway might be a bit more difficult.

 

You will find a night & day difference between the newer BMW 1200/1250 RT's & your older R bike (BIG! difference)/

 

I can set  the cruise control on my 1200RT at 100mph+ then take both hands off the bars for miles at a time using just a little body lean (or even minor arm movement) input to keep it tracking straight (even in normal freeway curves or making lane changes)

 

Your older 1150 might (probably does) have a little PTTR (Pull-To-The-Right) built in due to powertrain weighting offset so riding with no-hands is sometimes more of a challenge as with no-hands-on-bars usually allows the bike to lead off to the right all by itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve

Ha.  This 15 year old bike is new to me compared to the 1980 version I moved up from.  My new bike is old!  :(

 

I still like it though.  Thanks for all the tips!

 

:)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
3 minutes ago, R65_Steve said:

Ha.  This 15 year old bike is new to me compared to the 1980 version I moved up from.  My new bike is old!  :(

 

I still like it though.  Thanks for all the tips!

 

:)

 

 

 

Morning  R65_Steve

 

I didn't call it old, I called it older (slight difference).

 

Nothing wrong with an 1150R bike as they were darn good motorcycles. Wouldn't be my first choice for ultra high speeds in freeway traffic but just perfect for 65-70 mph secondary road cruising.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twisties
3 hours ago, R65_Steve said:

 Tires are due to be replaced in a couple weeks.  They are Bridgestone Battle-ax.

 

I can only assume shocks are stock and would have 30K if so.  

My guess is that the new tires will help.  IDK the shocks in that bike, but my OEM shocks on the RT were changed out at a little over 20k miles with noticeable degradation in their performance.  Most of us go to a rebuildable shock such as Ohlins, Wilburs, or similar.  A good shop will help will you choose and get them set up for you.  Then about every 20k miles or so you send them for a refresh.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
realshelby

I used to be one of those guys that passed Dirtrider.....

 

The bike is 98% of the confidence past 70. Honestly, the RT feels rock solid at 100+ mph. I have cruised at that speed for miles upon miles.

 

But I have also found that the extra concentration involved with looking for cops/speed traps/likely hiding spots and the extra vigilance really doesn't make my trips better. In fact I am now probably one that would be passed by Dirtrider under many conditions. Yes, I tend to pass a high percentage of the traffic. Even get behind a rabbit for a while ( old habits are hard to break!). But you make time not by going fast but by average speed. I limit my stops and probably get where I am going faster now. 

 

I don't even take a radar/laser detector on trips now. Definitely less than 10 over posted speeds....usually. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twisties
13 hours ago, realshelby said:

But I have also found that the extra concentration involved with looking for cops/speed traps/likely hiding spots and the extra vigilance really doesn't make my trips better. In fact I am now probably one that would be passed by Dirtrider under many conditions. Yes, I tend to pass a high percentage of the traffic. Even get behind a rabbit for a while ( old habits are hard to break!). But you make time not by going fast but by average speed. I limit my stops and probably get where I am going faster now.

I agree, fast riding is tiring and not the best way to make a long day.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill_Walker
20 hours ago, Twisties said:

I agree, fast riding is tiring and not the best way to make a long day.

 

But it's the best way to make a long day short!

 

But seriously, I find that, while really fast riding can be tiring, riding somewhat fast, such that I have to look for cops, etc., helps me stay alert.  At strictly legal speeds, I find my mind sometimes wanders and my riding deteriorates accordingly.  YMMV, of course.

Also: if you're going across Nevada on 6 or 50 on a BMW at less than 90 indicated, you're doing it wrong.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
On ‎6‎/‎20‎/‎2019 at 12:08 PM, realshelby said:

I used to be one of those guys that passed Dirtrider.....

 

The bike is 98% of the confidence past 70. Honestly, the RT feels rock solid at 100+ mph. I have cruised at that speed for miles upon miles.

 

But I have also found that the extra concentration involved with looking for cops/speed traps/likely hiding spots and the extra vigilance really doesn't make my trips better. In fact I am now probably one that would be passed by Dirtrider under many conditions. Yes, I tend to pass a high percentage of the traffic. Even get behind a rabbit for a while ( old habits are hard to break!). But you make time not by going fast but by average speed. I limit my stops and probably get where I am going faster now. 

 

I don't even take a radar/laser detector on trips now. Definitely less than 10 over posted speeds....usually. 

 

 

Morning Terry

 

In most cases riding fast is not about getting there quicker, it's about having way more fun on the trip (basically putting the 'sport' into Sport Touring).

 

For me it also a lot safer motorcycling as putting along at 5 or 10 over leads to daydreaming, mind wandering, caveman mentality.     If something happens in traffic it is all over before the riders mind re-engages & deals with it.  

 

Staying on the top edge keeps the rider alert, always engaged in the moment, almost always a place to go in an emergency as you usually have the choice of where you are moving to in traffic, or where you just came from in traffic, or that 'OUT' that you always have front & foremost in your ever active mind.

 

The big thing in riding substantially  faster than the traffic flow is stopping distance, but that is usually more than  offset by having an out (or 2) always in your riding mind at all times. 

 

Some traffic situations just aren't  flowing right to go faster than traffic flow so for those a rider just needs to just suck it up & putt along like a sheep.    

 

I'm definitely not saying for a rider to ride out of their comfort zone or above their inherent ability but if a rider is up to the task it can make a trip feel shorter even if the overall ride takes longer.

 

Above all don't be that idiot rider that stands out, looks dangerous, or looks out of control. Be that smooth flowing  rider that can make going 20 over look like a part of normal traffic flow.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve

As a practical matter...radar will pick up a bike, right?

 

I'm from VA and over 80 is reckless.  That cost me a pretty penny* in my sedan.

 

 

*It was like 100,000 pennies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wbw6cos

Radar can pick up a baseball, it is up to the LEO to decide which vehicle is speeding.  Motorcycle all alone, well.................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
15 minutes ago, R65_Steve said:

As a practical matter...radar will pick up a bike, right?

 

I'm from VA and over 80 is reckless.  That cost me a pretty penny* in my sedan.

 

 

*It was like 100,000 pennies. 

 

Afternoon R65_Steve  

 

Yes, radar will  pick up a bike  but it has a very difficult time telling an automobile from a bike so if around cars & trucks those usually stand out first.

 

It's the more modern laser that usually gets the bikes, thought a motorcycle is more difficult to keep the laser sight on if it does get a laser lock on the motorcycle then there is no doubt that 'THAT' is the speeding vehicle.    

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill_Walker
3 hours ago, R65_Steve said:

I'm from VA

Where radar detectors are illegal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
R65_Steve
1 hour ago, Bill_Walker said:

Where radar detectors are illegal.

Yes.  So is speeding.  ;)

 

The SPECTRE system picked up my V1 in my sedan years after the incident I mentioned above.  Got a ticket for that.

 

Maybe I need to fit it to my bike for trips out of state. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Green RT

One thing that I don't see mentioned yet, is the effect of time into the ride. If I pull onto a freeway first thing into a ride, 100-110 kph (60-68 mph) will seem like a good speed. An hour later, I notice that 130-140 kph (80-87 mph) feels slow.

 

I like the feeling of powering up to pass people, but for steady cruising 110-120 (68-75) feels comfortable to me. But as others have mentioned, I usually ride just a little faster than the other traffic. It keeps most of the action in front of you. You just have to keep track of the mirrors for the odd driver going much faster than everyone else and coming up behind you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, R65_Steve said:

Yes.  So is speeding.  ;)

 

The SPECTRE system picked up my V1 in my sedan years after the incident I mentioned above.  Got a ticket for that.

 

Maybe I need to fit it to my bike for trips out of state. 

 

 

Evening  R65_Steve

 

The V1 sure wouldn't hurt but once you get to states that allow radar detector's they become fairly ineffective as those state's usually use laser based systems or non detectable  VASCAR.

 

The V1 can be an asset in smaller back woods towns but to me the constant false alarms kind of defeat the useful warning ability.

 

I won't go into it on this site but if serious you might look into laser or radar jammers (illegal but effective).

 

I usually go to speedtrap.org   before venturing out on a trip (not fool proof but every little bit of added info helps). It's pretty darn accurate in my local area that's for sure.

 

I'm a big believer in riding heads-up w-a-y out in front as distant traffic actions/re-actions can really telegraph LEO enforcement working the area. Once you figure this one out it can REALLY make a difference in avoidance.

 

One of the most effective things that I have found is to ride with a retired LEO then keep my yapper shut when stopped.  

Edited by dirtrider
Correct .com to .org per Charles
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wbw6cos
16 minutes ago, Green RT said:

........................I like the feeling of powering up to pass people, but for steady cruising 110-120 (68-75) feels comfortable to me. But as others have mentioned, I usually ride just a little faster than the other traffic. It keeps most of the action in front of you. You just have to keep track of the mirrors for the odd driver going much faster than everyone else and coming up behind you.

 

Try it with a 1250 RT.  With all that power, every speed feels slow.

 

With my wife riding pillion, 5-10 mph over the limit is the norm, however when solo,  the speeds are quite higher.  :bike:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Charles Elms
2 hours ago, dirtrider said:

 

 

Evening  R65_Steve

 

The V1 sure wouldn't hurt but once you get to states that allow radar detector's they become fairly ineffective as those state's usually use laser based systems or non detectable  VASCAR.

 

The V1 can be an asset in smaller back woods towns but to me the constant false alarms kind of defeat the useful warning ability.

 

I won't go into it on this site but if serious you might look into laser or radar jammers (illegal but effective).

 

I usually go to speedtrap.com  before venturing out on a trip (not fool proof but every little bit of added info helps). It's pretty darn accurate in my local area that's for sure.

 

I'm a big believer in riding heads up w-a-y out in front as distant traffic actions/re-actions can really telegraph LEO enforcement working the area. Once you figure this one out it can REALLY make a difference in avoidance.

 

One of the most effective things that I have found is to ride with a retired LEO then keep my yapper shut when stopped.  

 

The site is speedtrap.org not speedtrap.com

looks like a good site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dirtrider
9 hours ago, Charles Elms said:

 

The site is speedtrap.org not speedtrap.com

looks like a good site.

 

 

Morning Charles

 

Good catch, I guess I should have actually looked at my speedtrap bookmarks & not assumed it was a .com/ I have had that sight bookmarked on all my devices for a long time so  just click on it therefore don't actually type it in.  

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill_Walker
On 6/22/2019 at 4:06 PM, dirtrider said:

The V1 sure wouldn't hurt but once you get to states that allow radar detector's they become fairly ineffective as those state's usually use laser based systems or non detectable  VASCAR.

I suspect there's a huge amount of regional variation in this.  Laser can't be used from a moving patrol car, while radar can.  I generally avoid speeding in towns, where laser is most likely.  Away from towns, I still see plenty of radar, mostly in moving cars.  Note that this applies to riding mostly in CA, NV, and UT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill_Walker
On 6/22/2019 at 4:06 PM, dirtrider said:

One of the most effective things that I have found is to ride with a retired LEO then keep my yapper shut when stopped.

BTDT.  That "get out of jail free" ID card came in handy a couple of times with my old riding buddy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LittleBriar
On 6/22/2019 at 7:06 PM, dirtrider said:

One of the most effective things that I have found is to ride with a retired LEO then keep my yapper shut when stopped.  

My brother in law is a LEO and we ride together often. He's on a big Harley but likes to ride a brisk pace. I let him lead and I never worry about tickets.

He also gave me a great tip. He gave me a wallet size picture of himself in full dress uniform. He told me to put it in my wallet just in front of my drivers license. When an officer asks for your license, registration and proof of insurance, pull out your wallet and make a special effort to make sure the officer sees the picture as you pull out the license. He will invariably ask, "Who's that?". I was then instructed to say, "That's my brother, he's an officer with the Middletown Police department." And then, this is important, pause briefly, then simply say, "and I love cops." They will chuckle and let you off the hook. Trust me, this has worked at least a half dozen times in the past 10 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LittleBriar

Not recommended.

gay cops.jpg

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marty Hill
On 6/21/2019 at 9:36 PM, Bill_Walker said:

 


Also: if you're going across Nevada on 6 or 50 on a BMW at less than 90 indicated, you're doing it wrong.

I was caught doing 98 on 6 a few years ago.  When I told the young cop I was 79 he told me to slow down and let me go.  I did slow down as I was sure he called ahead to have them look for me.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joe Frickin' Friday
On 6/19/2019 at 5:45 PM, R65_Steve said:

Not a burst to pass a big truck...but how fast do you all ride on the Interstate, sustained?

 

Generally less than 10 over the speed limit.  This is mostly because I want to avoid getting a ticket, but my personal safety limit isn't much higher.   AIUI, interstate highways in certain parts of Texas have an 85MPH speed limit.  I'm not sure I'd want to sustain 94 MPH for long.  Ever tried an emergency stop from that kind of speed?  It takes a loooong time.  

 

I say this despite having fond memories of running at 95MPH, and considerably more, on two-lane roads in rural Utah years ago.  What can I say?  I was a different person then.  It was fun at the time, but I'm more conservative these days; if I were to be on a bike in that area again, I'm sure I wouldn't be riding as fast as I used to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rinkydink

I usually run 6-8 over the speed limit on the interstate.

 

My late brother (diehard HD fan) and I rode to mile dirt track and Moto GP races all over the US. We would trade bikes for a change of pace and give the butt a different perspective. I couldn’t wait to get back to the RT. It felt like a piston might suddenly blow up thru the gas tank on the Road King. The engine was shall I say really singing at 80/85mph!!

 

I got a warning ticket in CO on I-70 one year when riding with a group, I was bringing up the rear and the LEO said he pulled me over because I didn’t have the guts to lead. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...