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John Ranalletta

If I had lost interest in the Olympics before, this doesn't help revive it

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After living in SLC during the 2002 Winter Games I concluded that the Olympics are completely and utterly corrupt.  Haven't watched or followed since.  Since, I've concluded pretty much all professional sports and much of college level sports are also utterly corrupt...  I just stay away.  

 

You wonder what I speak of:  1st of all Utah voted "no" on trying to seek the games.  A private consortium went after them anyway.  Based on our referendum the Government was forbidden to support the bid, but it did.

 

Then scandal after scandal came out in the bidding process:  providing prostitutes, college admissions, and other bribes were defended as, "the way it works," "expected" and "necessary."  It went on and on.   There were squabbles over venues:  The University of Utah was announced as the opening and closing ceremonies site and the dorms would be the athlete's village.  The "U" replied that they hadn't been contacted and that their facilities were fully committed and school would be in session.  They said no way.  There were similar problems elsewhere. 

 

Finally, with the games approaching, organization in shambles, complaints of ticket sales fraud rampant, complaints about downtown being cordoned off and shut down, etc, Mitt Romney was hired to straighten it all out.  He did an amazing job, although there were still major problems.  Thousands of people did not get to see the events for which they were ticketed due to mismanagement and squabbles.  There was the French and Russian Judge's Colllusion in the Figure Skating that resulted in two Golds being awarded.  The Feds nearly pulled out from security cooperation because the Utah Legislature would not prohibit firearms in the venues... this went on until a few weeks before the games began.

 

Meanwhile, TV coverage was a farce.  SLC was blanketed in one of the worst inversions on record.  Local coverage showed the horrible air quality and reported on the athlete's issues with it, and the impact it had on performance.  CBS shot over the top and showed sunny skies, never reported on the thousands of people who missed their events, and generally mis-represented the whole affair.    

 

Ask me an I might even tell you how I really feel...  :-)

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John Ranalletta

Yikes.  Now, add bearded ladies to the mix.

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LBump

SLC has nothing on Barstow... and, there are no INVERSIONS (that I know) to deal with, plus you can enjoy "Skipping n Prancing"  :)

This will be 5 minutes and 32 seconds you'll never get back.

LINK

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eddd
5 hours ago, LBump said:

SLC has nothing on Barstow... and, there are no INVERSIONS (that I know) to deal with, plus you can enjoy "Skipping n Prancing"  :)

This will be 5 minutes and 32 seconds you'll never get back.

LINK

They got my vote!

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Norm  83

Go Barstow!! :grin:

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Bud

Boy, was I disappointed  by the title. Sex Testing in Elite Sport.

 

I thought there was going to be a new Olympic event. Not at all. Seems like the author doesn't know the difference between sex and gender.

 

When asked to complete medical forms that have Sex _______  I always fill it in with YES!:classic_biggrin:

 

 

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Red

I'm with you John.  This is a world gone mad.

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longjohn

Meh.  There have been some memorable performances that I just can’t forget:  Phelps’ come from behind victory (in the last 10m to win his 7th gold, by .01sec),  or the team of Diggins/Randall squeaking by to win only the second medal for USA in cross country skiing history. I may not see historic finishes like these again, but if I don’t watch I’ll never have the chance. 

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lawnchairboy

Like games where it is individuals against an objective measure: usually time/distance/power.    

 

Rhythmic gymnastics?  Figure skating?  Events subjectively judged?  Not so much. 

 

Team sports with objective measures are good, but I’m not much of a basketball fan.  

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Joe Frickin' Friday

I saw the title and immediately thought of the case of Castor Semenyaa South African woman who was subjected to sex testing after turning in performance improvements which, at the time, seemed implausible without artificial enhancement.  

 

The first line in the article John linked to says it all:

 

Quote

If we’re going to define the women’s category in elite sport on the basis of sex, we have to be prepared to sort athletes in and out on those grounds.

 

This task is easy and stress-free for 99.9% of cases; it's that last tiny fraction of cases that causes many of us to squirm a bit.   But if we're going to enforce notions of fairness in competition, he's right: we have to figure out how to handle those rare cases.  And while this thread may have started with the Olympics in mind, it really is about all elite-level sporting groups.  

 

It's worth noting that sex verification isn't a new thing; in the modern era, it came up as an issue as far back as 1936.    

 

To the extent that people are uncomfortable with bearded ladies, there are two points here:

 

#1: bearded ladies are nothing new.  There are plenty of women out there who were born with ovaries but still find themselves dealing with body hair in places and quantities that violate societal norms.   We're not talking about a few wisps of dark hair on the upper that can be eliminated with occasional waxing or bleaching; these are coarse, full beards that would make Julian Edelman proud.  

 

#2: To the extent that people's discomfort with sex verification is about having to acknowledge the existence of transgendered women, it's worth noting that one of the goals is to prevent transgendered women who aren't "feminine" enough from competing against cis-gendered women.  Too much testosterone?  Sorry, you'll have to compete against cis-gendered men, or wait for your testosterone levels to decline and then try again.  It's also likely that the bearded ladies mentioned above (cis-gendered women who are typically afflicted with polycystic ovary syndrome) would not be able to pass sex verification either, due to abnormally high testosterone levels.  (not that you're likely to see them in the Olympics anyway, as PCOS causes an array of symptoms that tend to preclude elite athletic performance.)

 

So if you're uncomfortable with women who don't fit your preconceived notions of what a woman ought to be, then sex verification testing ought to be a welcome thing.  

 

Since we're talking about fairness in athletic competition, if you want something to get irritated about, I'll offer the case of Oscar Pistorius, a double amputee runner who was allowed to use prosthetic feet when he competed in the 2012 Summer Olympics.  There was much debate over whether his prosthetic feet conferred an advantage or not, and whether clear advantages in one phase of the competition (e.g. the straight, steady-speed portion) were adequately offset by disadvantages in other phases (e.g. the initial launch/acceleration).  Ultimately, it seems to me that it's impossible to separate the performance of the athlete from the performance of the prosthetic devices, especially if he knew when he was being tested (and could choose to turn in a lackluster performance).  In the end, I felt that permitting him to use prosthetics to compete in non-disabled Olympics was unfair to the other athletes.  

 

Quote

Rhythmic gymnastics?  Figure skating?  Events subjectively judged?  Not so much. 

 

I'm not generally a fan of figure skating either.  The one exception I'll offer is the team of Meryl Davis and Charlie Whitesomething about they way they moved and worked together on the ice set them apart from their competition.  They gave the appearance of being very natural and easy-going, rather than rigidly rehearsed, and it made it a pleasure to watch them perform. 

 

Traditional gymnastics events can also be impressive displays of strength, skill, and execution.  But I'm with you when it comes to events like rhythmic gymnastics and synchronized swimming.

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John Ranalletta

IMO, in most contact and all strength sports XY's should not compete against XX's regardless of how they "identify".   

 

 

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Red

 

"IMO, in most contact and all strength sports XY's should not compete against XX's regardless of how they "identify".   

 

That'd be too simple to administer and logical.  I like it.  Another option is to have categories of xx, xy, and an 'open' class for those of the first two categories but hormonally don't fit those categories.  Of course having a third category would extend the competition from 7 days to 10.  Maybe you could deal with that by having the open class compete before or after the xx & yy's so those who want to stay and watch or view via media can.  Those who don't, don't have to.

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RPG

I'm probably nuts but if the genders are supposed to be equal, then why is there Mens and Womens basketball? Mens and Women's track and field?, and so on and so on?????

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