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Can't-Bus and LED taillights


Pat_Da_Geeeze_Donahue

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Pat_Da_Geeeze_Donahue

My two friends and I took delivery of our new bikes last night. I bought an Adventure non-ABS and they bought standard GSes with ABS.

 

All three of us immediately upgraded our taillights before even rolling the bikes off the showroom floor. They moved the jumpers for the ABS and I didn't. Made sense at the time. Theirs worked perfectly but mine didn't light the taillight though the brake portion worked. This morning I moved the jumpers to ABS and tried again. Works perfectly now.

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Pat, what's going on here is the LED's draw much less current than the standard bulbs do. To compensate for this, the LED's lights include a resistor which simulates the load of a standard bulb, that is selectable by this jumper.

 

The bike monitors the current being used at the tail light to determine if a bulb is out. Since yours was originaly not enabled, your system assumed that the bulb was burned out and it used the remaining bulb to act as both. Once you set the jumper, the bike now "knows" that the bulb is good and it is operating like normal.

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Pat_Da_Geeeze_Donahue

Ken, the jumpers are on the LED taillight I bought. They just jump in the resistors that RightSpin mentions.

 

RightSpin, the GS Adv only has a single bulb for a taillight. It surprised me that when it senses no resistance it turns off the voltage to it. What's the point?

 

Pat

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Single bulb but two elements.

 

If it senses no load on the normal taillight, it will hold the brake light element on at 50% as a replacement.

 

As far as why it stays off...um, because it's German?

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Ken, the jumpers are on the LED taillight I bought. They just jump in the resistors that RightSpin mentions.

 

RightSpin, the GS Adv only has a single bulb for a taillight. It surprised me that when it senses no resistance it turns off the voltage to it. What's the point?

 

Pat

 

The can-bus logic is basic: No Faults = apply power, any Fault = remove power. In other words, it treats open circuit and short circuit the same way, it is not working to spec therefore fail-safe applies and power is removed.

 

Andy

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